Showing 13 results

Archival description
Bryce, Elizabeth Marion (1854-1939) wife of James Bryce, Viscount Bryce
Print preview View:

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Apologises for having neglected Patterson's letter, 'especially the business at the end for [Patterson's] pedagogical friend [Frigyes Medveczky]'. Declares that as he knows nothing about fortnight programmes, he had decided to wait till his brother Arthur came to see him, as the latter 'is in intimate relations with many schoolmasters.' Explains that Arthur was prevented from coming by a [feverish] cold, and states that he is endeavouring to obtain what Patterson's friend wants 'by the next best channel.' Regrets not being able to do more for Medveczky. Believes that he would have got much information 'from D.B.' States that he has lost sight of [William?] Ralston for many years, but would be glad to meet him.

Regrets to hear Patterson complain about the burden of work, and declares that his experience 'is all in favour of writing out lectures', which not only saves trouble, but also tends to make the lectures better. Asks after Patterson's politics. Refers towards their drift towards Dualism or Federalism. Believes that, 'owing to the fiasco of the "Times" the drift will be apparently very decided for a few months.' Declares that 'the chief hope of the Unionist cause seems...to lie in the chapter of accidents.' Observes that they in England are so engrossed in their own affairs that they only spare a mild interest for [Servia], and the apparently growing success of Russia. Believes that the latter will win in South-Eastern Europe. Declares that they are all delighted with Bryce's book, and asks Patterson whether he had heard of Bryce's engagement to Miss Ashton of Manchester. .

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her and Henry for their gift of a book stand, which Bryce's sister [Mary or Catherine?] informs him arrived at B[ ] Square since he left the previous Monday. Explains that he and his wife are in Cumberland for four or five days [on their honeymoon?], 'before going to the further parts of Tyrol.'

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Would give him the greatest pleasure to come to her 'on the 19th', but fears that he will not be able to come to the Ad Eundem, 'as it falls in the Whitsuntide vacation', during which he hopes to go on holiday. Is unsure when they [he and his wife?] shall get away from London, but thinks that the chances of his being in Cambridge on the 19th are small. Suggests that they invite some other friend; is very disappointed to miss the opportunity of seeing her and Henry.

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

Typewritten copy. Thanks Bryce for his criticisms [of Sidgwick's Elements of Politics?]: will think over his advice in relation to the last chapter. If he does not take Bryce's advice, will introduce his '"questiuncules" with an apology'; he will also add a statement on his view of the question of sovereignty. Confesses that he despairs of the general reader, but undertakes to think over Bryce's suggestions. Says he has little to say of concrete interest, and that to conceal his 'barrenness of practical wisdom', he takes refuge in analysis. Sends the spare proof of chapter thirty-one [not included]. States that he is inclined to agree with him that the legal and practical questions have been confused in the discussion. Adds that he and Nora were sorry to miss the Bryces on the previous Sunday.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Elizabeth Bryce

Typewritten copy of letter. Her letter has just reached him at Var on their return from the island [the Île Roubaud]. Regrets that he and Nora will not be able to join her, as they have two necessary visits in Switzerland, and he must be in England again on 17 September. He and Nora are to attend two more 'experimental evenings' [involving Italian medium Eusapia Palladino and some prominent members of the Society for Psychical Research]. Wrote a letter to her husband, James Bryce, the previous morning, but fears that it will have just missed him. Their stay has been longer than had been previously anticipated, but believes that the prolongation has been of use. Refers to the Mediterranean island on which they have been staying, which is a delightful place to live, apart from the presence of mosquitoes. Wishes her and her husband a successful tour, and expresses his regret that he and Nora cannot join in it. Sends Nora's kindest remembrances.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

MS copy letter. Since he last wrote to Bryce he has been 'going pretty steadily the wrong way, as regards convalescence'. Is writing now before Bryce goes to the Alps; hopes he will have good weather 'and a favourable selection of fellow-countrymen' in his hotel. Hopes to see him and his wife when they return: does not wish to think of Hindleap Lodge, as he has had to do with the Alps, as a place he will never see again. Had a conversation with Arthur Balfour about 'the "New Academy" - i.e. the question that will present itself in case the Royal Society will have none of [them].' Discusses the selection of members, and remarks that there were probably always rejected candidate supported by cliques, but that the number in their age 'is likely to be indefinitely larger, and the cliques indefinitely more noisy.' Balfour suggested that it might be worth while to get the Prince of Wales to interest himself in the subject. Wishes Bryce a bon voyage.

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Has now read nearly all the proofs of [Henry Sidgwick's] The Development of European Polity sent to him by Nora; calls the book very interesting, and says it reads 'quite connectedly'. Observes that each lecture 'has its topic', and that the sequence of treatment is clear. Remarks also that there is a sort of a lecture character about the book, but believes this does not injure it. Suggests, however, that 'here and there expressions more natural to oral discourse than to writing might be modified' and that the summaries at the beginning of some lectures of what had been said in the preceding lecture might be shortened or dispensed with. Has made a few suggestions in the margin in pencil, and has corrected a few clerical or printer's errors; his suggestions relate to points of detail, as he generally did not find fault with statements of fact. The lectures on Rome present 'with singular p[ ] and conciseness the broad features of a very complicated subject'; also praises the account of feudal Europe. Would be glad to be of any further use. Offers to return the proof to Nora at Newnham or at any other address. Announces that he is returning to London the following day. Sends his wife's love to Nora. They shall be in Sussex after Saturday.

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Sends Nora some of Henry's' letters to him [see 105/31-39]. Two or three of them relate to the University Tests Repeal movement, in which Henry took an active part. One letter, relating to F.W.H. Myers' poem St Paul when it first appeared', is interesting. Another about history in Cambridge was a reply to Bryce for advice on whom he should ask to join in starting the English Historical Review. Remarks on Henry's modesty in disclaiming historical knowledge for himself; comments on how admirably he handled it in The Development of European Polity. May find more letters, as he is certain that he has had many more. He and his wife are going down to Sussex for a little before they go abroad. Refers to proof sheets of a notice to appear in the Transactions of the British Academy [not included].

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for the letters, which he claims remind him of 'some of the steps connected with the establishment of the British Academy' that he had forgotten. Confirms that the statement Nora sent to him is quite correct, and states that he has added a few words, 'which explain the thing a little more fully to those who may not know the facts.' Believes that it is very possible that he has some of Henry Sidgwick's letters about the [British] Academy, but had not found them before leaving London. States that Henry and Lord Acton were the two who had most faith in the idea, but that his [Bryce']s correspondence was chiefly with Henry. Adds that the other letters reached him safely, and thanks her for them. States that he [and his wife] will be in Sussex until about 25 August, and then they plan to go abroad for five or six weeks. Asks her to let them know if she should be at T[remans]. Adds that they hope to be back [in Sussex] in October.

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Explains that he found her letter of 25 September on his return to his home that night. States that there is nothing in the diary entries that she sent him in the proof [of the memoir to Henry Sidgwick] to which he objects. Remarks that what Henry wrote in the diary is very interesting, and expresses the hope that there is a good deal of it that she can publish. States that he will recommence his search for letters from Henry now that he is in London again for a few days. Believes that he could find some a later date, i.e., between 1870 and 1895. Reports that he [and his wife] have had an instructive, but rather tiring tour in Macedonia and Bulgaria, and sends on his wife's love to Nora. Adds that he has found the last letter Henry wrote to him, and sends a copy of it [not included], and remarks on the 'serenity and cheerfulness' in it and 'the interest in things which still remained with him.' Confirms that the ' "New Academy" ' is the British Academy, 'for whose establishment he [Henry] had taken some pains'.

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Apologises for not writing sooner; knows Elizabeth will be busy with Julian 'on her hands''; hopes Miss Boucher [?] will return soon and be more content. The Bryces were here last Sunday; she is 'so much nicer for having seen more of the world', and he and Sir George had 'no end of talk'. The meadows are 'flooded up to the road' but it is not cold. The cook has gone for a holiday, while Hearn [the butler] is not well; fortunately they have no company at the moment. Maria [Springett] came from Gros[venor] Cr[escent] yesterday; the vans have been unloaded here and at Wallington, so the 'house is really given up'. The rest of the contents will be sold on Tuesday; she has brought away all they care for and is curious to know what the rest will fetch. Has never been without a house in London, so it is a strange feeling. Sir George is fairly well, though 'up & down in spirits with the news'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] was very tired, but not over-done by her hard week in London. Wishes she would not work so hard, but has 'no influence over her'. Sends love to Julian, and asks if he is strong yet.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Likes Julian's poems: he 'evidently has a good ear, & can Rhyme very prettily'. Had a 'great party to tea yesterday from Cambo' which 'looked like a school treat'; does not know how they all fit in the house. Glad Elizabeth has had friends; is very interested about Mrs Tovey; thinks [Donald Tovey's] decision to 'have a sensible person to look after him' was very wise. Glad that Miss B[arthorp, the new governess] and Julian are getting on. Mrs Sidgwick and the Bryces are coming next week, then Dr Hadow. They can only have two or three people staying as they have 'few servants & one sitting room', and Sir George gets too tired when 'there is anyone to talk to'. Sorry Elizabeth has had to change her 'girl'; they have trouble getting them. Sir George is reading her "These Twain", the last of Arnold Bennet's "Clayhanger" series.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Mrs [Eleanor?] Sidgwick and Lord and Lady Bryce are staying; Dr and Mrs Hadow [sic: (Miss) Grace Hadow?] are coming 'for a quiet Sunday'. The garden and woods are attractive in their 'untamed luxuriousness' as they are 'very short-handed everywhere'. Caroline is very anxious for George - he is too, but takes care not to worsen her anxiety - who is inside Gorizia with ten motors while the town is under heavy shell-fire.