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Sidgwick, William Carr (1834-1919) fellow and tutor at Merton College, Oxford
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Informs her that they have posts there [in Keswick] occasionally, if she wishes to write. Writes a list of 'pros and cons' in relation to their accommodation. Concludes that on the whole 'it is the best situation in Borrowdale: and therefore in the English Lakes: and therefore, for short mountain walks, in the World'. Admits to not liking the scenery as much as he did three years previously, and thinks that neither does William, but concedes that the scenery is beautiful.

Reports that they have met Edmund Fisher and his wife, 'who is nice and prettyish'. Announces that he reviewed a poem called Ludibria Lunae in the Spectator. It is a satire on the efforts to emancipate women from their subjection, and he claims to have tried to be as stinging as he could, without showing that he had lost his temper. Announces that they expect [G. O.] Trevelyan soon, and that he is to be married on 24 September. Reports that William 'does not seem unwell particularly', but his sleeping has not improved as much as they had hoped. Sends his love to Edward and the children. Asks if she heard that F[rederic] Fisher was engaged to his Bishop's daughter [Agnes, daughter of the Bishop of London, John Jackson].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks Myers for his letter regarding 'very satisfactory arrangements'. Reports that the musical box has been forwarded. Announces that they will arrive on 2 January at C[ ]. Regrets that they 'cannot interpolate Chelt. between Cam. and Clifton' because they expect his brother William and his wife rather late, and therefore must stay in Cambridge rather late.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Wishes that he could drop in on her, 'like William can, and see the [ ] lodge' for himself. Reports that their mother, 'after an ominous silence', sent him 'a laudatory but vague sentence about her.' Claims that he is 'a Galley Slave' that term, with a lecture at nine o'clock on Monday morning. Reports that he saw [Henry Weston] Eve the other day, 'but he looked more like Cambridge than Wellington College.' Reports that he has nearly got through the Old Testament, and shall have done all but Ezekiel by the time he goes down. Claims that the finest passages of the translation [from Hebrew to English] 'are destroyed by the barbarous fidelity of a ruthless German commentator.'

Reports that they have been having 'a violent university contest', and refers to Joe Mayor, who has lost his professorship [of political economy] by ten votes. Claims that the 'Bald-headed People in the university are confounded to find that the young men have elected a blind Radical [Henry Fawcett]'. States that he voted against Joe, 'purely on public grounds'. Announces that he is to dine with the Master on Monday, and is sure that he shall meet Miss Grote [Mayor's fiancée?] there.

Reports that Arthur is not well, and is 'plagued with the grandfather of all boils' on his finger. Reports that he saw Henry Bramley that day, and wonders whether he himself 'shall ever have so big a beard.' States that Oriental Studies 'are at a standstill [in Cambridge University] as [their] Hebrew Professor [Thomas Jarrett] is temporarily insane, and there is no one who can teach Hebrew or Sanscrit', and that besides him they have 'an Arabic Reader who never lectures except to at least two undergraduates...'

Asks her if she has seen any literature. Reports that there is 'a poetess who calls herself "Jean Ingelow" who is estimable', and that the 'Reviews have discovered that Woolners Poem [My Beautful Lady] is a swan', and does not think it 'a goose' himself. Asks how the house is getting on, and asks after Edward. Inquires as to whether the boys say the beer is bitter.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that his brother William is not coming to them, and states that he 'could probably pursue Truth before Christmas 23rd or 24th if those days were fixed - and equally any days after Xmas.' Asks him to let him know when anything is settled. Announces that he shall see Butcher in Oxford 'on Saturday 14th or Monday 16th and shall urge him to come to [them] on 18th or 19th'. Undertakes to telegraph to Myers when he knows what Butcher is to do.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Explains that he has 'just emerged from the mass of business and correspondence that the recommencement of [his] ladies' lectures has entailed', and now wishes to hear from her. Desires to know how she likes the town, 'and the J[ ], and the Germans', and whether she has read much German, and if she is keeping a large journal. States that 'it seems almost like a dream' that he was ever at Wiesbaden, 'and stood at the Roulette tables and saw the view from the Platte.'

Reports that he has been in Cambridge ever since he got to England, apart from a Sunday at Rugby, where he found that there is still a crisis. Believes that 'H[enry] H[ayman] will come badly out of it', and judges the latter to be 'an odd being', whose acts constitute 'a singular mixture of craft and stupidity.' Relates that, having been forced to reinstate [E. A.] Scott, 'he has done it with explanations and qualifications, which practically make the reinstatement incomplete.' Predicts that the matter will come before the board again. Reports that he wrote all she asked him, and hopes that everything turned out well. Praises the Museum W[ ] at Brussels, which he visited, and refers to 'the worst of seapassages.'

Reports that he missed William, but that Arthur 'seemed to think he was all right.' Relates that he saw no old Catholics as he passed through Cologne, but that he had much conversations about them 'with an intelligent German, who suspended them, as Horace says, on his upturned nose.' Reports that he has just heard from Ada [Benson], who says that she has just had 'a most successful tour and wants to know about Italian Hotels.' Expresses his wish to visit Venice, Florence, Rome and Naples, and states that when they have Bessemer Steamers [meant to reduce seasickness] on the Mediterranean he intends to go. Sends greetings to 'Chris [Benson] and his wife'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he and Nora cannot go to Cheltenham as his brother William and his wife are due to visit them, and then they are to go to the Symonds'. States that they must put off their arrival at Newcastle 'till the 2d: in order to s[ ] a day at Lincoln'. Reports that Edward White Benson is to be the new bishop of Truro. Asks Myers how he has got on with D[ ] 'in the intervals...of reading Mahaffy's reply!' Asks him to tell him 'how Jebb takes it'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

States that since he first got her letter he has been thinking over the question of 'C.B.'. Suggests that she split the question into two; firstly asks whether there is any prospect offered of C's finding occupation as a land agent after he has gone through the course, and if it is likely that there is a better opening for him in this line thatn in that for which he has already been trained, and secondly asks what abilities are required for even moderate success in the line. Is very glad to hear about William, and mentions that he is thinking of giving him a teapot as a wedding present, unless he hears that he has got teapots from elsewhere.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Offers to send her a book called A Lost Love by Ashford Owen [Anne Charlotte Ogle], which reminds him of 'Romance of a Dull Life etc [by Anne Judith Penny], only it is written with less intellect and perhaps more passionateness'.

Reports that he hears excellent accounts of her, and hopes that they are all true. Assumes that she is still at Hastings, Mentions that she may possibly be seeing William in a few days. Reports that he saw the latter at Oxford, and that he has given up his work for the term, and is going away, probably to Rugby first 'and then perhaps to Hastings.' Asks her how she finds Hastings. Declares that he knows it well, and looks forward to seeing much more of it in years to come, if his ' poor friend Cowell's life is preserved'; does not expect that Cowell will leave Hastings again now.

Hopes that she is not experiencing any fogs. Declares that they have been having a splendid autumn [in Cambridge]. Reports that he is involved in a project for improving female education, by providing examination for governesses. States that there is an attempt being made to form a joint board, consisting of members of the two universities, for the purpose. Mentions that there are also other projects. Remarks that it appears that there is particular activity in the North of England, where schoolmistresses 'and other enlightened people have associated themselves in several great towns, and out of these associations a general council has been formed with lofty aspirations'.

Refers to Matthew Arnold, whose 'unfortunate lecture on culture has been attacked again in the Fortnightly Review by Frederic Harrison'. Advises her that 'the Guardian Angel by O.W. Holmes is worth reading, though he thinks 'not good as a novel'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Sympathises with Myers in relation to his anxieties, and confesses to feeling guilty about his own happiness, while those around him are unhappy. Reports that his mother is 'ill and depressed', partly due to loneliness; refers to his brother William's prospects; while he himself 'cannot but feel [himself] in the Garden of Eden every week from Wednesday to Saturday' [visiting his fiancée, staying with her sister Lady Rayleigh at nearby Terling Place]; begs Myers not to 'tell anyone' Sidgwick gets 'away [from Cambridge]] for so long'. States that he shall be glad to see Myers 'on 14th'. Hopes that A[rthur] will be able to come 'on the 1st.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Informs her that he cannot come to her speeches, because of his hayfever. Announces that he would like to pay her a visit in July, if it is convenient. Explains that he has been very busy of late, and claims that his 'Destiny for the next few years' is being settled, and when it is, he shall write to her. Reports, with regret, that he hears poor accounts of William. Reports that George Ramsay is in Cambridge, and that he says he is going to call on Minnie. Suggests some reading material for her : Foul Play by Charles Reade, 'a sensation novel by a man of genius who has thrown himself a way; a 'book of travel' entitled Last Winter in the United States by [F. B.] Zincke; and 'entertaining Blank Verse (a rarity)' entitled Lady Grace by Miss Smedley. Refers also to her 'brother's attempt to instruct the gentlemen of the press in simple arithmetic (a complete failure)': his letter in the last Spectator, signed 'A Wrangler'. Advises her to read 'an accompanying book' [not included] dealing with infantile education, which Miss Clough gave him to show her. Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

[Written after their mother's death on 17 Jan 1879]:- Apologises for having misunderstood, and explains that it was 'William's mention of the "armchairs" ' that misled him. States that he is very glad to see the letters, which he sends back [not included]. Announces that he has informed William that he [and Nora] 'will come from Feb[ruary] 10th to 12th...to meet Edward'. In relation to the furniture, mentions that 'W[illiam] still proposes "lots" ', but he himself thinks that they can arrange about the things among themselves, and states that it is the memorial furniture that interests them most.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Explains that he had been expecting to hear her 'final views about the Greek', and says that he asked Mrs Peile to send her a circular. Still thinks that she would find it a mistake to learn Greek regularly, but offers his assistance nonetheless. Reports that their mother seems 'pretty well and in pretty good spirits', and that 'her absorbing interest is in Nevil, who has just left her.' Reports that they have seen Isabel, 'who seems to be going on well', and states that William 'is certainly not in a satisfactory state' according to their mother. Remarks that it is not surprising that he has no pupils yet, and thinks that he does not feel well enough to take them.

Discusses his thoughts on settling 'the exact amount of one's conscious need of dogmatic religion'. Claims that 'the consciousness of the comparatively low moral level on which [his] own nature seems to keep [him]' has often driven him to the verge of trying to alter his intellectual convictions, but that he has been prevented by the fear of moral deterioration. States that this dilemma 'belongs to some time ago', and that life has been made very smooth to him of late. Sends on his mother's love, and hopes that Minnie's children are all well again. Also sends Nora's love, and states that the latter is looking forward to seeing Minnie sometime in the following vacation. Sends their love to Edward, and looks forward to having them both in Cambridge in the following term.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

[Sent from Terling Place]:- Announces that he and Nora are not going to Rome as they had planned, partly due to his academic work, and partly due to the fact that he has 'been drawn more and more into some [local] quasi-philanthropic work at Cambridge' which involves the reconstructing of the old Mendicity Society on the principles of the London Charity Organisation Society, and which requires his presence there at Christmas time. Discusses the difficulties of the task; in his view, the 'people who ought to be helped 'are 'so often just trembling morally on the verge of helpless pauperism', and it is hard to say whether help 'will cheer and stimulate a man to help himself, or 'push him gently into the passive condition of letting society take him in hand and do what it will with him'.

Discusses Rayleigh's possible transfer to Cambridge, and refers to all the mathematical professors having signed a memorial to urge him to come and succeed Maxwell as Professor of Experimental Physics. Remarks that it is unusual to give up leisure and the comforts of a country house 'unless one is quite sure that one's duty to society requires it.' Asks her for her opinion of Ada [Benson, engaged to be married], and asks her to send him Ada's address. States that they were 'very much delighted to hear of it' and that [Henry Weston?] Eve has told them 'good things of him [Andrew McDowall, Ada's fiancé].' Reports that they have seen Arthur, but not William, who is not very well. Sends his and Nora's love to Edward and the children, and asks how much came from the 'Personal Appeal' after all.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Asks whether Arthur [Benson] is coming up to Cambridge for the Trinity Scholarship Exam, and states that he and Nora shall be delighted to take him in at Newnham College. Announces that they shall be staying up until the end of Easter week 'and can offer him a selection among about 35 eligible apartments.'

Says that she should write and congratulate him 'on the distinctions which the Learned World is conferring' on him: the University of Glasgow is to make him an L.L.D. 'about April 29th', and that Trinity College has just decided to make him an Honorary Fellow. He and Nora are well; the North Hall [at Newnham] 'is apparently prosperous'; Nora 'is rather overworked but cheerful'; and he is 'putting through the press a book on the Theory of Political Economy.'

Refers to 'the triumph of the 24th of February', and claims that he 'shall never forget the astonishment with which [he] realised that the Senate House was full of about 400 M.A.s and that...they were all going to vote on the right side [in favour of the education of women at Cambridge]' with 'the Enemy' only about thirty in number States that he does not feel elated by the proceedings, as he claims 'a natural aversion to responsibility', and does 'not underestimate the difficulties and perils of the future'.

Reports that Arthur and Charlotte [Sidgwick] have both been over that term, but separately, the latter having come with Margaret Arnold, 'who has been performing at a concert with Joachim.' Mentions that 'her young man [Hugh Frank Newall] wants a post as scientific-mathematical master in some school', and tells Minnie to suggest him if she hears of such a post. States that all was well at Oxford when they last heard news from there; that William is fairly well, and that the alarm about Nevil is over. Asks for news from Minnie, including 'the last particular of Church work. Sends his love to all. Adds that [Thomas Edward] Brown's poems Fo'c's'le Yarns are out. Suggests that she buys them, or persuades her friends to buy them.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Asks her to forward the enclosed [not included] to Hugh. States that the story he sends 'is certainly one worth keeping, 'if the boys are sure of the detail[s] of the coincidence.' Reports that their evidence 'is growing very bulky: but the quality is...very various.' Hopes that she and her family are all well, and states that he and Nora had a good account of them on Tuesday from Miss Temple. Reports that Arthur and Charlotte were in Cambridge on Sunday 'in a prosperous condition', and that William and Isobel are expected 'in a few hours'. Hears that William is well and is in good spirits. Reports that he [Henry] went on a Psychical Research tour in the west a fortnight previously, 'and squeezed out a day at Clifton and walked about Durdham Down with Graham Dakyns.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that on the following Tuesday he goes to Germany, and states that he hopes that he shall not return until he can speak German fluently. Undertakes not to read any English, apart from her letters and the Times, and to speak it as little as possible. Asks her to tell Edward that he shall be in London from Friday until Tuesday morning, staying with J. J. Cowell in Hyde Park, and that he expects a visit from him. Explains that he wishes to see some friends who are going up for the Eton and Harrow match at Lords. Reports that he heard on Monday from their mother, who 'is with William at Beddgelert without Books', and states that he sent Whewell's Plato to her. Remarks that she seems to be enjoying herself. Regrets that he could not have gone down to visit his aunt Henrietta before he went abroad. Reports that he read through 'the famous Leiden [des jungen] Werthers [by Goethe]' the other day, which, he claims, he could not put down until he finished it. States that he has begun on Jean Paul, but finds him very hard. Undertakes to write from abroad. Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Gives reasons for his failure to write up and send his diary, including his efforts to finish his book [The Elements of Politics], and a bad cold. Undertakes to begin it once his book has been brought out. Asks if she has seen William, and reports that he has received at least one letter and a postcard from him. Remarks that he 'seems to be thinking again of some employment beyond his examining.' Reports that Hugh left them on Thursday, 'apparently in complete convalescence.' Refers to the latter's doctor, [Edward Henry?] Douty. Asks whether she thinks if Edward would be disposed to join the society mentioned in the enclosed note [not included]. Explains that the writer 'is a [country] solicitor, who is in his leisure hours an original and active-minded archaeologist.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he and Nora have to begin their journey to England [from Switzerland] the following day, as they have engagements all the following week. Regrets that there is no chance of meeting up with Minnie. Is sorry to hear about Hugh's health. Reports that Nora wrote to Isobel from Italy, giving their favourable view of William's condition; thinks that any advice as to how to deal with the situation 'would be dangerous' as it might make Isobel feel that they had gone over to William's side. Reports that he has had another letter from William, 'who has achieved the ascent of the "Grand Paradis" in which he has failed twice before in previous years.' Hopes that things 'will go all right when he gets home', but fears that if there is a spell of bad weather immediately after his arrival in England, they may go badly.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

States that he has just received her note. Reports that they found William at Zermatt when they returned from an expedition the previous afternoon, and have been with him all day, 'walking up to and down from the Gower Goat' Reports that William seems to them 'in a very satisfactory condition'. Refers to [Edward or James?] Rhoades, who has been with the latter for a fortnight, and states that that both he and William consider it to have been 'a most successful expedition'. Reports that William had intended to stay in the region and tackle some of the high passes there, but a decree of the Federal Government prohibiting the employment of French guides has forced him to change his plans, and he has decided to accompany Henry out of Switzerland into Italy to do the '[Tour] of Monte Rosa', and then go back to Chamonix. Informs her that he gave William her address. Hopes that she will have a good time. Reports that they are at present 'depressed by corporal ailments of various kinds', but they are otherwise cheerful.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Edward White Benson

Blames his failure to write sooner on his 'vexed and unsatisfied feelings...about Ada's M.S.S.'. Does not think that the two stories she translated are particularly interesting, and judges their translation to be no better than average. Does not know what to do on account of being informed by [Alexander?] 'McMillan' that 'the translation from the German, even of first rate quality is enormously at a discount...', and has decided to do nothing until he has discussed the matter with Benson. Undertakes to attempt to find 'a more cheerful bookseller than Macmillan' if Benson finds Henry's opinion of the stories 'exaggeratedly unfavorable'.

Refers to his mother having given up all hopes of all the family coinciding at Christmas, as the Bensons plan to go to the seaside. Is glad that his mother proposed going to Bristol; both he and Arthur were eager to go there again. Is anxious to go to Wellington College to see his sister and Benson, and asks the latter to tell him when they leave. Explains that he cannot get away 'before the 17th' because William is coming to Cambridge for a few days at the end of term. Announces that, according to his plan, they are all to be together at Rugby for a few days. Explains that he is very busy with 'plans and pupils, friends and fellowship dinners...' Asks him to tell Minnie to write, and to give her his love.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the receipt of his book the previously night. Claims that she will not understand its subject, but that if she could send it forth to the world 'with a mother's loving dedication, it would be that all the philosophical world would be the better for reading it.' Hopes that 'they' have written to him from Rugby to tell him that they are meeting on 4 January, and informs him that 'A[rthur] S[idgwick] and Charlotte have their visit at N[ ] and the Chancery first, and don't get home again until Sat: 2[nd] Jan[uary].' States that William's work was to end the previous day, but that he has had a bad cold, and Isabel and his [son] have also been ill. Invites him to go to Oxford, and suggests that they all go to Rugby together. Mentions Henry's friends, and declares that she doesn't know what the Greens' plans are. Reports that she has seen a good deal of them, and that 'they are most kind.' Reports that Mrs Symonds was with them a short time ago, and 'just as [she] was going to have a nice [ ] [ ] with her, a telegram came to say that one of her children was in scarlet fever and she must go home.' Adds that it turned out that the fever 'was of a mild kind'. Presumes that he is 'still engaged with work for the Ladies', and insists that he take a holiday. Reports that Arthur Benson has had a rheumatic attack 'just as he was going in for the Term's Examination at Eton - and so missed it - which grieves him.' States that he was expected at home on Thursday or Friday, and that Martin comes home from Winchester the following Wednesday. Adds that Minnie and Edward are both well, but that the family could not join the 'Rugby party'.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie kept her well-informed about Henry when at Lincoln, and that his own letter told her more. Refers to his activities with regard to his lectures and book. Asks him to go to Rugby around Christmas, 'when A[rthur] S[idgwick] wishes to assemble [them] for his house warming.' Adds that Minnie and Edward cannot go because their boys will just have arrived home from school. Expresses a strong wish that he should come to Oxford. Adds that Mr Green has been asking her when Henry is coming. Reports that William and Isabel are recovering from colds. Asks if he had told her that Captain and Mrs Go[ ] lived at Cambridge, and asks him to send her the address of Mrs Go[ ]'s sister Be[ ]. Informs him that his godson Willy [Longsden] 'has been doing better lately + is promoted to a "Top hat" ' at Merchant Taylors' school.

Reports that the Committee of the Association for the Education of Women at Manchester have asked Miss Cannan to be Secretary 'for that [work] where she lives - [ ] Prestwick.' Suggests that Miss Clough might like to be informed of this. Claims that she is 'still in rather a mess with carpenter + masons + painters to follow.' Adds that she has two comfortable beds to offer to friends, and tells him to bear it in mind if he wishes to go to Oxford. States that William and Isabel would be pleased to see him [and Nora] and that Mr Green and his wife always have a welcome for him. Reports tha the Symondses have come home from Switzerland. Reports that Edward Sidgwick wrote to her to tell her another daughter of his was born some weeks previously. States that he was much interested in what Henry had to say about spriritualism, and that their friends the Cooksons told them that Henry was at the Lakes and talking on the subject.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at receiving word from Henry, and at knowing that he is not ill. Explains that she came to Budleigh Salterton to be with Miss Temple 'who has been poorly for many weeks'. The latter was disappointed that she could not go to Rugby for the Speech Day with her brother and nieces. Reports that William wrote to say that he was glad she was coming and thought 'that it was imprudent not to compress the business of moving into as short a space of time as possible'. States that she reached Exeter on 27 June with Katie and Agnes Temple, and came to Budleigh Salterton having spent two nights at the Palace, to which she returns on Saturday. Hopes to be at Rugby again the following week. Describes the scenery and the beneficial effects of the sea air.

Reports that she left Arthur and Charlotte well, and that Mr Whitel[ ]d 'is so poorly in a sort of low fever, as to be quite unequal to his work'. Adds that Mr J. Wilson's brother Charles 'is come to do what he can to help'. Reports that Mr Phillpotts has been away 'owing to the illnes of his eldest boy who is away from Rugby', suffering from some kind of fever also. States that Miss Temple read her 'part of a letter to the Bishop [her brother Frederick] from a clergyman of the name of Hawkins', who asked the Bishop's opinion on the subject of spiritualism, and promising to send him some 'Photographs of "Incarnate Spirits"' Adds that she has not seen the Bishop since, but hopes to ask him about the matter when she returns to Exeter. States that she talked to Mr George Woodhouse on the subject, and expresses her own interest in it.

Reports that Isabel's brother Reginald Thompson 'is lately married to a Miss de Morgan a daughter of the Mrs de Morgan who is a great spiritualist. Refers to Professor Clifton, who told Isabel and her 'some wonderful stories told him by the elder [Mr] de Morgan now dead.'

Relates that Minnie has been suffering from toothache, and that Edward is in full residence, and that they will not move away from Lincoln until the end of September or beginning of October. Adds that their boys, Martin and Arthur, are going for scholarship at Winchester and Eton respectively, about 21 July. Remarks that she thinks that 'C[harlotte] S[ophia] S[idgwick] is a great favourite with all who know her', and doesn't believe that Arthur 'will find any great defects of which he was not aware - such as want of higher culture etc.' Adds that she has 'a sweet gentle temper', which is 'very winning.' Is anxious to hear from Henry, and is glad that he wrote to Mrs [ ]well, from whom she has not heard since.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the note that she wrote to him at the end of William's letter, and explains that she did not write since for fear of a letter not reaching him in Lucerne. Relates that she has been staying at Stone Gappe since, and has enjoyed her visit, despite the monotony of life and lack of amusement, and that 'all are so kind'. Describes the mountain air as refreshing, and claims that 'it seems to revive old feelings, and to bring vividly before one the days when life had never been a burden....' Claims to be grateful for the long holiday, but that much work remains to be done.

Fears that she has mislaid Henry's Exhibition Certificate, and undertakes to look for it when she goes home. States that her return home is delayed somewhat owing to her being unable to arrange her visits as she had wished. Believes that she will find solitude 'less irksome' than Henry imagines. Announces that she will go to Wellington College some time after her return home. Remarks that it seems a long time since she saw Minnie. Adds that she does not want either Minnie or Edward to feel that she 'should ever be the least restraint upon dear M.' States that she leaves Stone Gappe that day for Biddlesdon, where she shall be for about a fortnight, after which she intends to go to Leeds for ten days, and then home. Asks Henry to send her 'a Telegraphic message' if he is elected 'on the 29th', and wishes him success.

Remarks on Minnie going to Marlborough with Edward, who is to preach there, and on Mr Bradley having to entertain his company, 'Mrs. B. being upstairs!!' Reports that Arthur is at Wellington College, and will go to Marlborough with them. Adds that all send their love to Henry, and that Elizabeth [Cooper] is still there, but goes home on Monday.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'on the move' since Henry's letter reached her. Reports that William joined her at Aylesford on Thursday 28 June, and then they went to Rugby, where they spent a day with Mr and Mrs Dakyns. They then went to Llangollen. Describes their journey by coach to Capel Curig. Reports that William almost reached the top of Snowdon. Intends to write to Henry's aunt at Wellington College to see if she could receive him, and suggests that if she cannot, that he might come to her in Wales. Informs him of her plans to return to Wellington College, and states that Elizabeth [Cooper?] will be there the following week.

States that she was sorry to find that Mr and Mrs [Charles and Susanna?] Arnold had left Rugby, and that she did not whom else he 'could ask about Heidelbergh'. Suggests that C[hristopher?] Benson might know whether it is damp or not. Asks Henry to send her a book that 'will take a good deal of reading', and yet which she can understand. Suggest the 'Dialogues of Plato'. Relates a story which she heard from Captain [Cheese] at Aylesford about Mrs [Mary?] Pollard Urq[uhart] - 'a connexion of the [Thomas Hill?] Greens - who reported hearing 'distinct footsteps near her without her seeing any one', and also hearing 'a shrill scream equally unaccountable'. Offers to send 'names + places' if he is interested. Asks him to send her some poetry also. Inquires as to whether he has heard from Arthur, and if Mr [J. B.?] Lightfoot is gone.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that she is back in Wellington College, having left William at Chester on his way to the Raikes [Robert Hodgson Sidgwick's house at Skipton]. States that he goes to Oxford, and then abroad, his final destination being Florence. Refers to the enclosed [letter; not included]. Reports that after leaving Beddgelert they went to Carnarvon, then to Bangor, and on to Llandudno. Adds that at Llandudno they met a group of relations - her brothers William and John, with their respective families, 'the M[ ]s - B[ ] - and Miss M[ ] and Miss [Wraith].' Reports that Minnie is very well. Announces that the [Grand] Speech day is on the following Tuesday. Remarks that Edward needs rest and a holiday. Adds that Elizabeth is there also. Also refers to Rugby. Asks him to tell her about spirit-rapping. Reports that she heard good news from Arthur, and that he is enjoying his sojourn immensely. Includes his address in Ambleside. States that '[t]hey are all charmed with Mr. Lightfoot', and describes his and Arthur's activities throughout the day. Asks Henry to tell her how he likes Berlin, and adds that there were no letters from Mrs [Susanna?] Arnold.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie gave birth to 'a very nice plump little boy' that morning', and is well. States that Edward was away for the birth. Adds that Elizabeth claims that the baby is like William. Refers to Henry's letter, and states that they are all astonished at his 'cheap board and lodging with instruction', but expresses concern about 'those dreadful scourges' which afflict him by night. Is grateful for his description of 'the strange ceremony at Aix.' Hopes that he will find a companion to travel with. Announces that Edward 'is emancipated now and in a few days, all being well with Minnie and his babe'. Adds that he intends to go to Marlborough for a few days and the following week to join the party at Nab Cottage for a week. States that Mr Lightfoot has induced him to do so, and she is sure that it will do him good. Complains that the weather is very gloomy. Reports that Edward was not very well when his boys went away, and she does not think he has fully recovered yet. Remarks on Minnie's selflessness with regard to Edward. Reports that she has heard from William, and is now writing to him at Innsbruck, where she supposes he and Mr [Francis?] Otter will be in a week's time. Adds that he wrote from Munich, and had seen Henry's friends Cowell and Browning on their way to him. Sends Edward's and Minnie's love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports again on the birth of a son to Minnie and Edward. Explains that the latter had gone to preach to Mr C[ ]'s at [Denbies] to preach at his church that day. Reports that Minnie is well, and that the baby is in good health. In relation to his name states that 'Martin', 'Edward White' and 'Arthur' have been suggested. Reports that the previous Saturday Edward went to spend some time with Mr Bradley at Marlborough, and then went to Tong, where he intended to spend the night with Emmeline [Woodhouse, his sister], and then on to Nab Cottage. Is of the opinion that Edward needed a break from Wellington College and all its attendant problems.

States that the following week Arthur, Trevelyan, Lee [Warner?], St[ ] and others accompany Mr Lightfoot and Edward to W[ast ]water 'en knapsack, weather permitting...' Adds that he must be home before 14 September when the College opens. Reports that Arthur has not been well, and has been suffering from his circulation. Announces that a trip to the Tyrol is not to go ahead, and that Trevelyan is going with him to Scarborough when their 'Lake Expedition' is over. Reports that she has not heard from William since she received a letter dated 16 August from Vienna, after which they were going to Innsbruck, and then on to Florence. Reports that she received a letter from Ada [Benson], who 'seems to be making progress'. She had been dining with Mr and Mrs Sergent, and the former's sister. Had hoped that Henry would come to Dresden.

Hears from Mrs S[ ] that a new master is soon to be appointed at Rugby. Relates that some days ago Edward received a letter 'from the author of [Other]Footsteps on the boundaries [of another world etc etc. - enclosing an account of the dreams connected with the Italian boy', which she believes Mr Eagles told them some years previously. States that 'Mr Owen has heard these dreams as connected with the family of a Mr. Benson - formerly a "Teacher at Rugby" and so writes to ascertain the truth'. Asks if Henry can help. Informs him that a bill came for him from Warwick's some days previously, and asks him what she should do about it. Reports that his uncle Christopher [Sidgwick?] was at Wellington College a fortnight previously, that the Raikes [party?: ie Robert Sidgwick and family] have been at Whitby, and also that the Riddlesden [home of John Sidgwick] ladies are going there.

Relates that Henry Longsdon and his family 'have been living for some weeks at a clerical hotel in London', and are travelling in Derbyshire, and that Fanny [Henry Sidgwick's cousin] goes home soon and will stay at Seacroft until Henry decides whether he will take the [ ] Secretaryship. Reports that William Lace [another cousin] and his family are at Stone Gappe, and that 'he is soon going to attend a social science meeting in Scotland'. States that her friends at Rugby keep looking for a house for her. Asks about Henry's progress with German.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

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