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Hubrecht, Abrahamina Arnolda Louise Grandmont (1855-1913) painter, wife of Alphonse Grandmont
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Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - They have not yet retired to their 'Retraite Edéniencee [ie, at Ede]', as her cousin calls it; does not think they will go before early June. The Grandmonts are still where she left them at Rocca Bella [Taormina, Sicily] at the end of April; they are travelling back with an English friend, stopping only briefly at Florence and Bâle. Was sorry to leave Italy 'like that' but it could not be helped; made her all the more anxious to return another time. Wrote to her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht] and sent her Trevelyan's messages, but does not know whether she will go to England this summer; he does not seem anxious to go and she supposes 'the husband's opinion has great weight in these matters!'. She herself will not be able to; is currently here alone at home with her uncle and aunt [Paul François Hubrecht and his wife Maria] and would not like to leave them when she would have to go 'to fit in with Senior's week at St. Andrews'. Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and the trouble he took with the list of books, though she has not yet got all those he suggested, in part because the library is currently closed. Fortunately the director is a friend of the family and can be persuaded to break the rule forbidding books to be taken or sent into the country, so they sometimes get a good selection sent to Ede; however spring-cleaning is 'a holy business' in this country so she must wait. Asks if Trevelyan could possibly send some of the books he listed: something by Henry James; his father's book; [Robert] Browning's letters; she will get [William?] Morris's "Life" [by J. W. MacKail and his brother's book from the library. Has been reading [Elizabeth Barrett Browning's] "Aurora Leigh" for the first time; asks whether Trevelyan likes it. Will be curious to see Trevelyan's friend [Thomas Sturge Moore]'s poems which he sent to her cousin; wonders whether they will appreciate it; does not think Mrs Grandmont has 'specially classical tastes'. Would be very nice if Trevelyan could come to Ede this summer; unsure still of when exactly would be the best time as she knows nothing of the Grandmonts' plans; thinks probably late August or early September. Is longing to get to fresh air in the country; town seems oppressive after Taormina.

They all feel 'greatly honoured... with all these noble peace delegates' being at the Hague; the Congress was opened yesterday; one of the Dutch members told them 'what a feeble old president Baron de Staal seemed to be' and that 'the first meeting did not promise much'. Is sending some Taormina photographs; the one with Mrs C [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan?] is 'funny but too indistinct'; [Giuseppe] Bruno took the same view which better shows Mrs C. 'like some curious prehistoric Juliet on her balcony'; she has it and will show it to you, or Trevelyan could write to Bruno and ask to see the several pictures he took in her garden of her 'constructions'. Glad Trevelyan has heard some good music in London; she feels out of practice and is looking forward to playing with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] again. Knows her aunt is giving her the biography of Joachim by Moser for her birthday. Will also have to 'make special Vondel studies this summer'; feels she knows very little about him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is very sorry she did not know in time to tell Bob the concert last Monday was cancelled; it was not [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen but [Johannes] Messchaert who was ill; he still cannot sing so the second concert will also be put off. Very sad as they would have had a good audience, and he will have to pay the costs. Has received Bob's poems and enjoyed reading them on the way to Almelo last Monday; likes part of 'the Indian poem' very much, though it is rather vague; the 'fairy poem' is charming and she wishes she had the power to set it to music; questions his choice of interpretation in the line of his Ronsard translation.

Is very glad Bob will come to The Hague; he is right that she would not like him to come without her family knowing; she is not under such 'romantically difficult' circumstances to make that necessary and what she said about their 'suspicions' probably made a stronger impression than she intended. Bramine [Hubrecht] even encouraged her to tell them about it; it would not be 'so unwise', since she is 'in reality quite free and independent', and if she could tell her aunt and be sure she would discuss it with her uncle, she might; however, thinks she would not feel real freedom when Bob was here if they knew what had happened. She will therefore tell her aunt that Bob intends to come over and do some translation work with her, asking her aunt to trust her and help 'conquer any objections' her uncle may have though she thinks he will agree at once. Marie [Hubrecht] and her American friend Maud [Howard] leave either next Monday or Tuesday, Marie for Florence and Maud for America via Paris; all three servants are then leaving in the first week of November so the household will be unsettled, and her aunt is suffering from a bad cold, so she will write as soon as all is well. Asks if he would prefer a first-rate hotel or a moderate one.

On the whole, had a good time at Almelo though it was strange to spend so much time with her friend [Adriana Salomonson Asser] after so long but they struck up quite a friendship again; she and her husband, a Jewish manufacturer [Henrik Salomonson] are very musical; it seems they hear little violin music so she was 'the talk of the town' after playing at their soirée. Is about to read Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" and "La Samaritaine"; asks whether Bob knows and likes them.

Letter from Leonore van Alphen to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Witte Huis. - The mild weather has turned to an 'old fashioned winter' so Arend [her son] has gone skating at Vinkeveen. Jan [her husband] has not yet been skating, but will do so when it turns less cold. He has been for a short stay in Mürren and Lauterbrunnen [Switzerland] as chef d'équipe of the Dutch students skiing group. Julie Graffman [her daughter] is staying here at the moment with her youngest child Sture; Holger [Julie's husband] is coming in about four days and they will all then travel to America. Six architects have also been staying, one of them Lucia [another daughter]'s husband [Van Ginkel]. Two of the architects are English - John Voelcker, and Peter Smithson, who knows Julian and 'thinks highly of him' - they are leaving tomorrow. All the architects love the Paddestoel [Lucia Hubrecht's house] and also think the Witte Huis 'very charming': how her aunt Bramine and Alphonse Grandmont 'knew how to live!', though she herself would like to be in Sicily [where Bramine Hubrecht and Alphonse Hubrecht also had a house] now for the winter. Sends her own love and that of Jan, who is sitting by the fire downstairs reading to Julie, Lucia, and the wife of a friend of Arend who works at the United Nations in America. Tante Liesje [?] is 'the same & well looked after'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

22 Sussex Villas, W. - Has written to Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht] 'about her young Russian'. Tells Bessie to make sure Bob writes the article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore as soon as he gets home. Will be away from the middle of March to the middle of May, so Bob must communicate directly with [Edward] Jenks about the article, unless [Nathaniel] Wedd or [Goldie Lowes] Dickinson return from their Easter holiday in time to take it. Glad they have got 'such a jolly place'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Apologises for not thanking Trevelyan sooner for sending his poems ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"]: would cover his face if he wore a chlamys or toga; discusses them at length. Has tried to translate the poem about the bat in love with a star ["The Lady's Bat"] and "Fairy Song" but failed, in contrast to Trevelyan's success with Catullus' "Phaselus". Finds some merit in the illustrations [by Roger Fry], and they are in harmony with the text, but feels they lack sincerity. Hopes that Trevelyan's stay at Ravello gave him inspiration. He and Bramine have bought a small house by the sea and invite Trevelyan and Bessie to stay there, or at their room at the Fondo [?] or with them at Rocca Bella.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Expects this is the last letter he will write her from Ravello; will start on the 24th, spend some of that day at Pompeii and take the evening express to Florence, arriving next day. Bessie's last account of her 'patient' [her aunt] was better; hopes she may be recovering by the time he reaches the Hague. Has been unlucky with the weather for the last two years but should not complain, as if the weather had not been bad last January he may not have accompanied his brother [George?] to Sicily and met Bessie. In the same way, if the Grandmonts had had a cook at the start of 1896, they would not have dined at the Timeo so he would never have met them and heard of her; he ought to 'like all cooks for that henceforth'. Bessie's quotation from Dante was 'very charming'; asks if she copied it out at Ede before 2 September or after. Encloses a 'little relic' he found in his waistcoat pocket, which he has kissed; she too should 'put the bits [of the railway ticket] together and kiss them' since they brought her and Bob together and made them kiss each other, though she did not kiss him till November, and he kissed her wrist 'a whole month and more before'. Did not sleep well last night as '"that horrible little dog" Gyp (as Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] would say' was barking; Madame [von Wartburg] has the dog safe in her room tonight.

Finishes the letter next day; the weather is lovely, and he almost regrets leaving, but will enjoy a few days in Florence and seeing [Bernard] Berenson; wants to see what he thinks of his last year's poems, and what he has done on this play. He usually likes Bob's work, but not always. Discussion of how no one person can be relied on to say whether something is good or bad. Hopes to see a few pictures at Florence, though does not mean to do much sightseeing. Sorry that Bessie had to miss Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; thinks she is right that she should not come to England before her aunt is nearly well. Glad that her cousin [Louise Hubrecht] and the Röntgens liked his poems; Bessie is indeed a 'fine advertising agent'. Describes his breakfast here and in England.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Is delighted that Wolfram [von Eschenbach's] Perceval is appreciated by Trevelyan and his friends: he thinks it one of the best medieval chivalric poems, admiring its depiction of character and unity of action, as well as its philosophical and moral scope; encourages Trevelyan to compare the beginning of the first song with the Epistle of St James. He had thought his translation [published 1892] would be read by the French, but thanks to Trevelyan it is the English who buy it. The heavy rains in Sicily, reported in the newspapers, have damaged his houses and spoiled his vegetable, tomato and olive crops, while his grapes have been carried off by rats, lizards and insects since all the neighbouring vineyards have been destroyed by phylloxera. Attempted murder of a young man from Taormina, Ciccia Fallone, by his deserted lover Saredda Bugra: Trevelyan and Bessie will remember them both. Rumour that the end of the world will come tomorrow, so he and Bramine jokingly send all their love.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Expresses gratitude for Trevelyan's generosity towards the Grandmonts' pensioners and the Society, especially since they have learned they must support both the local beggars and the nuns who care for them. Miss Hill had said the Franciscans had their own property [reference to the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of Mary, who ran the lace and needlework school started by Mabel Hill]. Peppe, the old man who is 'the ornament of [the] hospice' has been seized by a religious mania and has gone on a pilgrimage on foot to Saint Alfio. Thanks Trevelyan for his "Cecilia Gonzaga".

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Received Bob's letter this morning, and nerved herself to tell her uncle and aunt about his intended arrival; her aunt 'understood at once' and made no difficulties, though said her uncle may make some; she then found her uncle writing to Bramine [Hubrecht] in his study and told him, he was amazed but wanted to 'grasp at once the whole situation' and told her he saw quite through her pretext and understood everything but she begged him not to speak further about it. So they are both quite cheerful about the subject, and are probably discussing it now she has gone to bed.

Writing on the next day, she says that things were not so cheerful that morning, and her uncle took up the subject of Bob's visit again after breakfast; will not go into detail, but he does tend to 'attach enormous importance to convention' and it is hard for him to take everything in. But he does not want to make things difficult, and will leave her 'quite free' when Bob is here; he would like Bob to pay a formal visit on his first afternoon in the Hague, when the pretext for Bob's stay, 'poor old Vondel', must be mentioned; Bob will then be able to come the following morning and probably regularly to do some work. In the afternoon when the weather is fine she has to walk with her aunt, who she thinks would like Bob to join them. Thought he might stay a fortnight; if it suits him to go on early to Italy of course he must, though asks if he is sure about meeting the Frys in Siena, as she thought they were going there before Florence, which is why the G[randmont]s did not meet them and why her cousin Marie [Hubrecht] has gone first to Lugano and Milan. Is sorry to hear Bob finds it hard to settle to work. Discusses further her objection to Bob's translation of a French phrase [from Ronsard]; thanks him for his 'little grammar lesson about "shall" and "will"'.

The latest news of the [Second Boer] war must be 'very distressing' to the English; asks if Bob still feels it would be good if the English were 'well beaten'. Of course thought of the war itself is 'an intense horror'. Asks if Bob knows anyone fighting; they have heard of some 'striking losses', such as the death of a 'very beloved nephew' of their friend Dr Koster [Tuimen Hendrik Blom Coster?]. The feeling against Britain is very strong in the Netherlands; 'flags were put up in many streets when the news of Ladysmith reached' them; wonders if Bob will mind that when he comes. Suggested the 12th as the day he should come since he had mentioned a [rugby?] football game the day before; would not deprive him the chance of 'displaying [his] chief if not only vanity' and hopes he will enjoy himself. and not come over 'with a blue eye & some fractured bones'.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Regarding the will of Madame Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]: according to Bramine, Trevelyan's brother had some qualms about the duty payable, but Grandmont explains Italian inheritance law; thinks Trevelyan would be able to sell part or all of the estate. Does not believe the widower [Salvatore Cacciola] could create difficulties. Grandmont however does not know the situation in detail, so Trevelyan should not be swayed by his advice to either accept or reject the legacy; he should consult a Sicilian lawyer before making a final decision. Recommends Calogero Galio at Catane and Adolfo Carducci at Messina. The legacy to Mariannina has no validity if the uncle does not execute the clause written by the dead woman.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that the snow in Italy has melted. Spent one night and '2 busy days' in London; Sir George went up for the day yesterday. Spent that evening with Janet, since George was at a 'review meeting' [for the "Independent Review"?], who is very well and 'enjoys the situation to the full'; approves of her preparations [for the forthcoming birth]. Thinks Charles and Mary are staying at Cambo till the end of the month. Mary has 'thoroughly got up the subject of Taxation of Land Values' and has given several short speeches on it; she has also written a leaflet which Caroline hopes to get printed for the W.L.F. [Women's Liberal Federation]. Good that she can help Charles politically. Wants Elizabeth's advice about pianos: there ought to be one at Welcombe, and she would 'like to change the monster in London!'. Has a room at Welcombe to write in now, so Elizabeth can now have the drawing room to herself to practice in. Expects Meg Booth will arrive [in Italy] soon. Asks if Elizabeth is thinking of going to Taormina this year; hopes the Grandmonts are well. "The Times" is 'so hard up for an argument for the sugar tax that they say it is unhealthy and that people should not eat so much'. A party of neighbours came for lunch recently, and more will come. Has had a 'nice letter' from Mrs Enticknap.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very sorry to hear of Charles Booth's illness; fears Amalfi is 'rather a comfortless place to be ill in', and he will be better at the Palumbo [in Ravello]. Sir George is better, though rather low and his leg still troubles him. They go to London on 15 February. Has lunched at Cheyne Gardens on a day's visit to London; Janet was well and 'declared that the 10th was the day of arrival [of her baby]'; they will see. Has seen nothing of Robert's play ["The Birth of Parsifal"] yet, but expects it will be published before long; hopes his work now goes well. Knows 'the sort of politician Mr [Thomas] Omond is: the 'wave of reaction has been too much for him'. Glad this now seems over; the political future is 'very uncertain' but she thinks things will be better now, though 'the difficulties are great'. Finds the current religious revival in many places including Stratford 'very curious' and 'evidently a reaction against the materialism of the last years'; such things never last long, but she thinks it will ;turn the attention of large classes to serious matters, & so do good'. Glad the Grandmonts are well; asks if Miss Reid is better; sends love to Meg [Booth] and hopes she and Elizabeth are happy.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Tells her about a discussion with Bargman, the man who did the house for him, about damp, the possibility of putting in a baize door as Gussie [Enticknap] can be 'a little obstreperous' after tea; and burglars. Thinks perhaps he should have the library, as first decided. [His aunt Meg Price] says she will pay the extra when they want a grand piano if she is still alive, which is 'very generous'; he has suggested she gets them a Broadwood £40 upright, but her 'professional friend' will know best what will suit a small room. They must go and visit as soon as they can; she rather reproached Bob for not visiting. Gives the measurements for the table. Sends her a curl from his head; is wearing hers next to his heart. Thinks he will send "The [Lady's] Bat" and "Dryope", and perhaps some others, to the "Speaker"; Hammond, an editor he knows, thinks they may put them in. Can break off his tenancy of the Temple rooms whenever he likes, but should like to keep them for the summer; Sanger will probably find another tenant in the summer, though he may still marry, which Bob and Fry think would probably be best although his friend [Dora Pease] has treated him badly. Sanger is in financial difficulty, which Bob does not want to worsen. Thinks he will probably go to the Lizard for a few days at Easter. Has not yet written to the Borrowdale people [the Peppers] about the honeymoon, nor to her uncle, which he should do this evening. Does not anticipate that there will be any difficulties regarding the wedding, but he should check; will leave the precise date of the ceremony for her and her relations to choose. Asks if she has heard from the Grandmonts. Had a scare yesterday when his Shakespeare, two Greek books, and the manuscript of his play, which he had hidden in the woods then 'wandered off meditating' were taken home by a passing labourer; was in despair but the gamekeeper suggested where they might be. The [Second Boer] war is 'getting to a very unpleasant state': the 'war party are very brutal, breaking up meetings, rioting etc'. Thinks the Government has behaved 'shockingly' for not suppressing them, there has been much indignation against them which may do good in the end.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Chillingham Castle, Belford, Northumberland. - Has come here for a night's stay; arrived in time for a 'beautiful walk' yesterday. Wonders whether the Grandmonts are with Elizabeth and hopes they are having this good weather if so; sends regards, and hopes they like the [new] house. Thinks she must come to London at the end of October; asks if she can come to visit on 31 October or 1 November; discusses travel arrangements. Audrey Trevelyan has been to stay; she played 'some queer music by a man called Debussy which she said was very much thought of in Paris'. Agrees with Elizabeth that music here is not very good, but thought Audrey played well. Everyone envies Elizabeth and Robert having [Donald] Tovey to stay with them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Returned last night and found her letter with the patterns. [Desmond] MacCarthy is here, as they went to see Sudermann's "Magda" ["Heimat"]; they are now going out to 'buy straw hats and see pictures and Sturges [Moore]'. Goes back [to Westcott] tomorrow. Had a good time at the Lizard; [George] Moore liked his play better than expected, though thinks its subject is 'not very congenial' to Bob and he does better with 'lighter and more comedy subjects'; Bob thinks he agrees, but will try to finish this one.

Continues the letter next day after returning to Westcott. He and MacCarthy went with a literary friend of Bob's called Horne to a music hall to see Dan Leno, 'a quite Shakespearian genius' whom Bessie must see one day. Will write to [Henry] Turing tomorrow and send it through Sir Henry [Howard]. Ready to admit her uncle is right and also does not want Sir Henry to be at the wedding; thinks his parents will understand if he talks to them. The Gr[andmonts]'s feelings 'make it necessary Sir H. should not be there', though he does not think they should carry them to such lengths. Encloses two new trouser patterns with the one she chose before. Hopes she enjoys her visits and concert, and sees something of J[oachim].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth enjoyed her visit from A. [Annie Philips?], whom she will see tomorrow, and that she is getting better; hopes she will keep Mrs Fry on to look after her. Asks if Mrs Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht] is expected. Mary went to Cambo to conduct her concert on Saturday, and had a car accident on Sunday; she suffered only slight cuts to the face but it 'brought out the neuralgia in her arm most violently' so she had to spend all Monday with Dr Ethel Williams; hopes she is better and at Harrogate again. Seems to have done [Mary and Charles] 'more harm than good'; she would like to go to look after them but 'dare not travel'; is taking great care of herself and Sir George. The three children arrive from Harrogate tomorrow. There has been a heavy frost, and 'all Stratford was skating yesterday'; one man broke his collar-bone on their pool.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved to have good news of Elizabeth; asks if she 'fret[s]' much about the 'disappointment [her miscarriage]'; she and Robert 'have been sorely tried'. They were fortunate to be able to get Nurse Godwin; when she has to leave they must get Mrs Fry or someone else efficient; expects Elizabeth will take a long time to recover. She and Sir George have managed to escape colds. C[harles] and M[ary] are going to London tomorrow. Very sad that Julian is 'still alone in his nursery', but at least he is well and strong. Hopes Madame Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht] will visit. Is sending a letter for Elizabeth to be given to her when Robert thinks best [10/139].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Unsure how he should address Robert; to continue to use his last name seems 'very long and ceremonious', given the good fortune that will unite them, but to treat him as a cousin would be a sort of 'anticipatory anachronism' not allowed by custom, 'though Canon Law proclaims engagements the equal of marriage'; 'Bob' however seems reserved for old friends and family, so he has settled on his 'name of baptism' - Robert. All of this ran through his head when he decided to write to Robert after the landslides at Amalfi. Bramine was very worried about Robert, and he had to show her that Ravello was at a distance, and in the opposite direction, from the place where the accident took place. Robert has made them 'taste the wine from those hills on which [his] poetic inspirations also grow' [a reference to his book, "Mallow and Asphodel"?] Is late acknowledging Robert's present as the sender sent it to Messina, and Grandmont had to 'complete formalities' to get it; also, he wanted to taste 'Bacchic liquor' before expressing the thanks it deserved. Drank a glass to the 'joyous entrée of Bessie into her new family', and they had a very happy evening; hopes this is a good omen for Robert and Bessie's happy future.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Madame Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht] will arrive safely today. Mary writes that she thinks Elizabeth is getting on well; hopes she will be 'quite convalescent' by the time Caroline sees her. Approves of the changes to the household planned for the Shiffolds: the E[nticknaps] have 'been most useful & devoted' but the strain on all sides is now too great; wishes they had 'sent the young man [Gussie] to be a sailor' and fears they will not be able to 'control him'. Sir George enjoys the publication of his book, and 'the letters & reviews are a continual amusement'. Will send a toy for Julian's birthday.

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence. - She and her husband have often thought and talked about Trevelyan since he left them, wondering what the future will hold; they 'must leave that to dear Bessie'. Things will be hard for them both now: Bessie will be in 'isolation' at home, as she will not be able to discuss this matter with Bramine's parents or sister unless she is 'absolutely clear in her own mind - it would be mental torture'. The 'terrible business of the [Second Boer] war' will also make an impression on her, feeling as she already does so strongly 'the wrench which marriage with a foreigner would be'. The worst thing about the war is 'the hypocracy [sic] with which all the English statesmen seem to be saturated', preparing for six months while giving the Boers the 'illusion' that an agreement could be made; and then there are speeches like that of Balfour and 'other so called honourable and religious gentleman'. Meanwhile, Harcourt 'protests, but will vote for the money [further military funding]! Is there then no generous mind left?' Are the English so much come down since Lord Chatham?'. In Chatham's day, however, the war was 'against men of the same race' rather than 'those stupid Boers, who live according to their antiquated notions derived from the old testament'; is 'bitter, very bitter, against the wicked Government', however much she likes Trevelyan, whom she calls 'my dear fellow'. As for Queen Victoria, 'one sees how, by being a sort of machine all one's life, one becomes one really at last'; wonders why she did not appeal to the nation; also criticises the other rules who sent ambassadors to the peace conference and 'do not move an inch to help against war', it is a sign of how low the 'moral standard' everywhere seems to be. In time the world will be 'one big Exchange' with no poetry, and nothing mattering but money and greed.

Returns to the letter after several days, now in Rome; meanwhile the British Parliament, apart for a few Irish representatives, have voted funds for the war; cannot understand the Whigs. She cannot sleep at night, and having 'loved the English so', nearly hates them now; cannot write to Bessie about Trevelyan, and in her place 'could never consent to give up my birthright of Dutchwoman, to become a subject of that wicked mecreant [sic] the prince of Wales', who 'sells his soul and that of his subjects for the gold of Africa' and will not even go out to fight himself. Has just received a letter from Bessie, which says Trevelyan is going to see her; prays that if he wins her love his influence may 'widen and deepen her love for all beings and things'. Feels 'very responsible in this matter', since it was she who brought them together, and Bessie is 'half sister, half child, exceedingly dear'. Would be 'dreadful if she became tainted by what seems... the national vice of the English = selfdeceiving egotism, overbearingness, hypocrisy' which they call 'commonsense'. Begs his pardon for speaking so openly, which she does as she knows he has 'width of mind enough to shake off all chauvinistic feeling'; perhaps he does not think the opposition should have refused the funds or resigned.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is sending a toy train for Julian's birthday. [Edward] Keith has had a bad accident on his bicycle and has concussion, which she is afraid is serious; will ask Nixon to pay G[ussie] Enticknap and give him his ticket; hopes he will go straight home. Good that this was decided before Keith's accident. Sir George is so alarmed about the strike that they might not go to London on Saturday but wait a while; was going to suggest visiting Elizabeth towards the end of the month but will let her know. Hopes she is doing well; sends regards to Madame Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht].

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Rocca Bella. -Thinks Bessie 'will be quite safe in [Bob's] hands'; congratulates him again, and thanks him for her letter. When she wrote hers [17/142?] she was upset; though she still feels 'just as wretched and indignant at the [Second Boer] war and the Jingos', she regrets giving her 'feelings the full sway so'. Bob's letter was 'most good and kind', giving her the 'best proof that any fears for Bessie were vain'. Hopes they will both be very happy; has no fears he will 'pull B. away from her people' and hopes he will 'continue to feel ever more at home with us' and that Bessie will be 'a loving daughter' to his parents. She never knew her father, and knew her mother only a little, so it will be 'sweet to her to get another father and mother' through Bob. Wishes she were in the Hague to do a portrait of Bessie now; expects her expression is just what she would like to paint. Hopes she did not 'make mischief' by writing to Mien [Bessie's sister]: could not make out from Bob's telegram that the engagement should be kept quiet for a few days. Only told Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup here.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to see Elizabeth's handwriting again; sorry that her convalescence is so long but it is to be expected. Pleased to hear good things of Nurse Shepherd; very glad that Mrs Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht] is there. Very sorry that the 'Enticknap crisis' has come about now, but it was impossible to prevent, and if action had not been taken 'there might have been a public scandal'. Hopes [Edward] Keith will recover but his injuries are serious, including a cracked skull and concussion. Mrs Keith has 'come out well'; writes to Caroline to say Davidson will see Gussie [Enticknap] off on Saturday. Will not go to London before Tuesday next week as Sir George is very alarmed by the strikes and 'pictures London starving & without warmth or light'; she feels more optimistic, but perhaps is 'too sanguine'. If they do not make the move to London for a while, she will definitely go up for a few days, including a visit to Elizabeth; she may bring Booa [Mary Prestwich], who would love to see Julian, and will 'have the motor, as Annie [Philips] had'. Sir George thanks Elizabeth for her message; he has been 'truly unhappy' about her.

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