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Ward, James (1843-1925) philosopher and psychologist
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Copy letter from J. G. Frazer to R. R. Marett

St Keyne's, Cambridge. Dated 11 May 1911 - [John] Roscoe is giving a series of lectures on the tribes of Central Africa and could repeat the lectures he is giving at Cambridge in Oxford, and gives his postal address to Marett; thanks him for his inaugural lecture ['The Birth of Humility'] and takes issue with Marett's interpretation of Robertson Smith's views of the order in which ritual and dogma appear, stating that he believed that dogma occurred prior to ritual, not the other way around, and adds that R. M. Meyer has ascribed the same belief to Frazer; in a postscript he questions Marett's regard for [William] McDougall as an authority on psychology and says his friend James Ward does not think highly of him.

Copy letter from J. G. Frazer to R. R. Marett

St Keyne's, Cambridge. Dated 17 May 1911 - Confirms that the Church Missionary Society is paying for the lectures that [John] Roscoe will give, and is glad to hear that he will be invited to give them at Oxford; continues their debate over Robertson Smith's views of the order in which ritual and dogma appear and what he meant by dogma, believes he was expressing a novel view of the importance of the study of ritual and that there was some thought in the minds of the first men, even though it may not be as reasoned as dogma; he thinks ritual bears the impress of some thought and purpose quite as much as civilised men, and responds to Marett's statement about psychologists, stating that he doesn't think them better qualified than those who study savage ritual, even such a friend as James Ward; agrees about the importance of criticism; was glad to hear that Marett is coming closer to his views on some points.

Two copy letters from Mary Ward to Sir James Frazer

72 Gordon Mansions, Francis Street, W.C.1. Dated June 25 and 27, 1930 - Thanks him for his kind letter about her son's memoirs [Kenneth Martin Ward]; is visiting her daughter Margery Lawson Dodd and will visit her sister in Cambridge [Anna Martin] and asks them to visit; answers his question about a memoir of her husband James Ward, she replies that her daughter Olwen wrote one as a preface to his papers and addresses on education; she lives the life of an invalid with a damaged heart and bronchial trouble; in the letter dated two days later she corrects herself, and says that the preface was in a volume of her husband's philosophical papers.

Typewritten accounts, and references to accounts, of HS by various friends, acquaintances, pupils, colleagues and admirers.

Includes Professor Maitland's speech at the memorial meeting for Henry Sidgwick; obituary by Miss E.E.C. Jones, which appeared in the Journal of Education for October 1900; 'Dr Keynes in the Economic Journal of Dec 1900', references to Sidgwick made by Professor Sorley, quoted from a letter of 2 September 1900, and from the International Journal of Ethics for January 1901; reference to Sidgwick made by Alice Gardner in a letter of 24 August 1900; 'Mr C.F.G. Masterman in the Commonwealth for November 1900'; 'From the Cambridge Letter of 1900 of the Newnham College Club'; 'A.T. Lyttelton [Bishop of Southampton] in a letter of Sept. 21, 1900'; 'Sir F. Pollock in a letter of Aug.30.1900'; 'Mrs Sanger [A.D. Pease] in a letter of Sept.23.1900'; 'Mr C. Cooper who took his degree in 1874 in a letter to Dr Ward' from October 1900; 'Professor Mandello, Professor of Law and Political Science at Pressbourg in a letter of Oct. 14, 1900'; 'Miss Agnes Mason in a letter of Nov 16. 1900'; 'Mrs McLeod [E. Stevenson] in a letter of Oct.24.1900'; 'Miss A.M. Jackson in a letter of June 9.1900'; 'Miss Alice Woods in a letter of Sept.2 1900'; 'Miss Amy Sharpe in a letter of Sept.3.1900'; 'Miss Emma Brooke in a letter of Sept.29.1900'; 'Miss Susan Cunnington in a letter of March 9.1902'. Some MS explanatory notes, amendments and emendations included.

Letter from Henry Jackson to James Ward

Expresses his gratitude for Ward's having called his attention 'to the dialogue between Henry Sidgwick and John Grote in the C[lassical] R[eview] for March 1889' [“A Discussion Between Professor Henry Sidgwick and the Late Professor John Grote, on the Utilitarian Basis of Plato's Republic.” (1889) 3 Classical Review 97], and hopes that he will see his way to publishing it. Refers to the fact that Sidgwick always had an interest in the subject and 'always comes to this question from the point of view of ancient ethics.' Finds it surprising that he never read that 'curious paper', and reports that he 'read with great care [ ] Wilson's mendacious attack upon Archer Hind.' Explains that at the time, however, he had been very busy, and had completely forgotten that the paper had appeared. Remarks that 'anything of Sidgwick's about ancient ethics ought to be considered', since it always seemed to him that the subject 'had an especial fascination for him, and brought out in full force his critical quality.' Returns with the letter the copy of the Classical Review [not included]. Also expresses his gratitude to Ward for his having given him his paper 'on the [ ] of psychology', which he 'shall read with all the more interest' because he is lecturing on [Aristotle's?] De Anima and believes that the paper will very directly bear upon that subject.

Jackson, Henry (1839–1921), classical scholar

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to James Ward

Claims to have meant to send 'these [articles]' sooner, but has been puzzling over the lectures on sociology, which she had mentioned, intending to send them also. Feels that she had better get 'a clearer picture of them and of their relation to published papers' before sending them.

With regards 'the Classical Review article' returns Dr Jackson's letter to Ward [not included], and sends one from J. B. Mayor to Henry Sidgwick . Asks him to return the latter at his leisure. Thinks that it would be a mistake to print the article in a collection of Henry's papers, as 'his part is so very short'. Adds, however, that Miss Sharpley, to whom she showed it 'is much charmed with it as an imitation of Plato'. States that Henry's part 'only brings out one point and [one has] no means of knowing whether he admitted Grote's answer to it to be sufficient - whether the G[ ] of the latter part of the whole paper can be considered as representing Henry's view or not.' Speculates as to the circumstances under which the discussion took place, and suggests it took place at Trumpington. Thinks that the article should be referred to in any bibliography and that a bibliography 'ought to be given either in the volume of fragments or in the biography....'

Also sends him the 1871 number of the Contemporary Review, 'containing the article on Verification of Beliefs...and one in the Nineteenth Century for 1880 on Historical Psychology'. Remarks that Henry was rather dissatisfied with the second one when it appeared. In relation to 'Miss Jones', states that she believes that Henry 'intended her to judge about publication [or] republication of Ethical matter in the same way that he asked [Ward] to do about philosophical work.' Thinks that she is 'a little too much inclined to publish' and considers trying to argue with her about any particular paper before a final decision is come to.' States that 'of course the question of republishing all the papers in Mind or all the notices of books is not purely a question of Ethics. Adds that 'in deciding about Ethical or Philosophical papers or anything else [they] must have regard to the whole amount to be published and the arrangement of volumes and must therefore talk it over all together to some extent.'

Announces that she envisages the publication of two volumes; one of 'philosophical and ethical etc fragments and essays for students' and one of 'more literary essays suited to the general public, and no more', and that the second would probably be entirely reprints. Lists the works possibly to be included in the first volume, including Kant lectures, Green lectures, Ethical papers, lectures on Sociology, articles on the Sophists in the Journal of Philology, the 'Dialogue in Mind on Time and Common sense', 'the articles in the Contemporary and XIXth Century sent with the letter [not included], Ethical articles in Mind, and 'some lectures on Kant's Ethics'.

States that the 'popular volume edited by A[rthur] S[idgwick] would probably be small', and would probably contain a review of Clough in the Westminster Review of 1869, an article on Bentham in the Fortnightly of 1877, 'Political Prophecy and Sociology for the National Review of 1899', the address on Economics 'to section F. of the British Association 1885', 'The Theory of Clerical Education from the volume on Liberal Education 1867', 'Idle Fellowship[s]' in the Contemporary [Review] of 1876, '[A] Lecture against Lecturing' from the New Review of 1890, an article on [Seeley's] Ecce Homo in the Westminster Review of 1866, 'The Prophet of Luther' in Macmillan's Magazine of 1867, 'The Economic Lessons of Socialism' in the Economic Journal of 1895, 'Economic Socialism' in the Contemporary Review of 1886 (though Nora thinks that the latter 'is probably practically superseded by Elements of Politics), a short appreciation of J.S. Mill's work on his death in 1873 (of which Mrs Marshall gave Nora a copy) in the Academy of 1873, and an article on sociology.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Baron Friedrich von Hügel to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that he is returning home to work, after a few days' stay with his mother. Wishes to write a few words of explanation with regard to 'the accompanying two letters' of Henry Sidgwick [not included]. Hopes that if either of them turns out to be suitable for publication, that he has not sent them too late. Asks her to return the letters to him when she has finished with them. Explains that he has not called 'at the Lodge', feeling sure that she would be away during the New Year vacation. Sends 'cordial New Year's greetings', and hopes that the memoir is advancing. Refers to a conversation he had with Professor James Ward about Henry the previous day.

Hügel, Friedrich Maria Aloys Franz Karl von (1852-1925) religious writer and theologian

Card from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

Returns letters [written about Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir; not included], and states that they are all very gratifying. Reminds Nora that 'of the pleasure and the praise 601/633 (exactly)' is hers. Remarks that those by 'ACB[enson], GOT, [James?] Ward, [Sir George] Young, and Tennyson were all good to read, and of course Cornish.' Says that he knew about William Sidgwick of Skipton having given evidence before the Faculty Committee [see 103/94], but that it was outside his drama. Has some duplicates of hers and a few more, and undertakes to send them to her when they reach 'a batch'. Note added in red ink saying that for real criticism they must wait for 'the unbribed Reviewer', but that 'it is a great thing to please the old friends'.

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Cambridge University Reporter: 'Report of the proceedings at a meeting for promoting a memorial of the late Henry Sidgwick, Litt.D. Knightsbridge Professor'

Meeting held on Monday, 26 November 1900. Lists those present and those who sent their apologies. Includes the speeches made by the Master of Trinity College [H. M. Butler] and the Vice-Chancellor, Mr Chawner; Sir Richard Jebb, the Right Hon. James Bryce, Leslie Stephen, Canon Gore, the Bishop of Bristol, Professor A.V. Dicey, Professor Maitland, Professor Marshall and Professor James Ward, as well as comments made by the Rev. J. Wardale and Professor Sorley. A motion proposed by Jebb that there be a memorial in Cambridge to Sidgwick was unanimously carried.

Letter from Alice Woods to Nora Sidgwick

Asks Nora's forgiveness for intruding on her sorrow. Wishes to add a few words to the sympathy which she is sure must be felt for Nora 'by every single person who ever knew' Henry. Has sometimes doubted the wisdom of working for the Moral Sciences Tripos from a teacher's point of view, but says she can never be too glad that she took it because it brought her in contact with Henry and 'Dr. [James] Ward.' Looks back 'on the hours spent in that delightful little study in the old house, as some of the most helpful in [her] life', and says she used 'greatly to envy the undergraduates who had the charm of discussing with Mr. Sidgwick some of the deepest problems of life'. Declares that 'even as it was, one's life has been the better and [stronger] for having known him'; has 'a dim idea' of what the loss must be to Nora.

Woods, Alice (1849-1941) Principal of Maria Grey College

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 31 January 1896. Apologises for not having written to her sooner with reference to her article in Mind on ' Significs'; explains that he has been very busy. Adds that he has delayed to write partly because he does not have any useful suggestions on the question of 'a Paper for the International Congress of Psychology'. Declares that he believes that the question 'is mainly one for logicians rather than psychologists and that it will not be very easy to find a mode of treatment which will make it an altogether appropriate topic for a Psychological Congress'. Suggests ' Interpretation as a psychological process' or some similar phrase as the title of her paper. Observes that she does not include psychology 'on p.25 - among the list of studies that has a peculiar meaning term correlated with it', and remarks that he thinks that there would be 'some interest in working out the characteristics of Interpretation as a psychological process'.

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

MS notes dictated by Henry Sidgwick with regard to his work and what is to be done with it

In Nora Sidgwick's hand. Refers to his lectures on philosophical subjects, some of which he believes should be published. Suggests that a young man might be employed to work on some of them and that [James] Ward might read the proofs through 'and give advice on any point of difficulty.' Refers also to a number of lectures that he had intended to make into a book on Kant and Kantism in England, and also to works on [T. H. ] Green, agnosticism and relativism and two lectures on [Herbert] Spencer. Does not believe that the lectures on Epistemology 'in connection with [Christoph von] Sigwart' are worth publishing as a continuous whole, but thinks certain parts of them might be published as fragments. Suggests Ward's involvement, so long as he would not undertake too much work.

Refers also to his articles on ethics, printed and unprinted. Expresses his wish that the question of 'the usefulness to mankind' be the '[ ] principle for deciding on publication', and that the volume of the labour required should be taken into account also. Would like lectures that are not published to be handed over to anyone who may be lecturing on that particular subject, and mentions in particular some fragmentary lectures on his book on The Elements of Politics, which he would like to be offered to Th[ ] or Dickinson or divided between them.

Has done a good deal of reading for a book, The Development of European Polity, for which the plan is sketched 'in the first lecture of a pamphlet containing 3 printed lectures.' Has been his view 'more and more of late years that a three fold treatment of Political Science is desirable for [ ]', and lays out his theory. Would like the teachers of Political Science to be consulted on the possibility of working out his plans with the aid of his material. Again suggests that a young man might be paid to work on this matter. Expresses concern over expense, and states that he believes his work to be 'too sketchy and amateurish for it to be desirable to use it otherwise than as material.' Was comtemplating giving up the idea of publication so long as he held his chair 'feeling that the time and labour required to make it an adequately scholarly work would not be given [ ]' with his duty as a Professor of Moral Philosophy.'

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

MS notes in Nora Sidgwick's hand

Includes the words that Henry would like to have said over his grave 'if it is decided not to have the Church of England service': 'Let us commend to the love of God with silent prayer the soul of a sinful man who partly tried to do his duty. It is by his wish that I say over his grave these words and no more'. Note that this was 'written down May 17 1900'.

Verses 'adopted by Henry Sidgwick. from Tennyson's Palace of Art when he left the Church of England in 1869', beginning with the lines: 'Yet pull not down my minster towers that were/So gravely gloriously wrought'. Page headed 'Henry's Texts', including [biblical] quotations.

Page headed 'Re new edition of Ethics'. Henry's desire is that, if he is not able to finish the revision, The Methods of Ethics 'be put through the press by Miss [E..E. C.] Jones without excerpts [he has] clearly indicated in the book itself or [his] MS notes of lectures that an alteration is required'. Suggests also the addition of a brief explanatory preface.

Additional notes relate to his works and the possibility of their publication. Believes that some of his philosophical works in which he attempts to define the scope of philosophy and its relation to, for example, psychology, logic, history and sociology, are most suitable for publication and study. Refers to a course of lectures on Kant, Green and Spencer 'which will be [more] easily brought out'. Refers also to a course of lectures on epistemology, which was delivered with Sigwart's Logic as a text book, and believes that part of it might be worth publishing. Suggests that [James] Ward might recommend someone who would read these works in order to select the portions he thought worth publishing. Insists, however, that Ward should not spend time on the matter that could be more profitably devoted to his own work. Discusses the difficulties that might be encountered in the publishing of his philosophical lectures, and refers to the part concerned with the relation of metaphysics and epistemology. Refers also to 'a discussion of Külpe's use of the terms and another discussion on idealism and realism, 'which will be found in the bundle relating to Külpe. List of some of Henry's works.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

Letter from Baron Friedrich von Hügel to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he writes the letter away from home; is down in Bournemouth with his sick sister. Expresses his sorrow at Sidgwick's illness, and at the news that the doctors fear that his health may preclude his returning to his full literary activity. Reports that he has been anxious all winter about the state of his sister's health. Tries to comfort Sidgwick with the claim that doctors 'are certainly not infallible', and suggests that HS may prove them wrong by producing more work. Claims that he likes to express his 'sense of grateful obligation' and refers to the fact that, as a Catholic, he is a some distance from Sidgwick in religious matters. Refers to Wilfrid Ward, Fr Tyrrell, W.J. Williams, von Hügel's brother and the latter's wife, as those who would express similar convictions and sentiments as von Hügel in relation to Sidgwick. Quotes Basil Champney as having declared, with reference to Sidgwick, that 'there can have been but extraordinarily few men in existence, since the world began, who have had as many friends, and who have been so entirely without enemies.' Reports that he has just had his first exchange of letters with Professor James Ward [a close friend of Sidgwick's], whose book was such a great satisfaction to him.

Hügel, Friedrich Maria Aloys Franz Karl von (1852-1925) religious writer and theologian

Copies of essays by Bertrand Russell written while reading for the Moral Sciences Tripos

Photocopies of six essays by Russell at the Mills Memorial Library, McMaster University: "On Pleasure; its definition, its causes & conditions, & the possibility of making it the end of rational action, written July 1893, with annotations by H. Sidgwick; "The Relation of what ought to be to what is, has been or will be" written Oct. 1893, with annotations by H. Sidgwick; three papers on Epistemology I-III, two undated, the other dated Nov. 1893, with annotations by J. Ward; and "On the Distinction between the Psychological and Metaphysical Points of View" written [1893/4].

Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872-1970) 3rd Earl Russell, philosopher

Letter from J. G. Frazer to 'Master' [Henry Montagu Butler]

Inch-ma-home, Cambridge - Thanks him for his letter giving his permission to use his name on the memorial [to the Australian government on preserving the anthropological record of 'primitive men now left on the globe']; other signatories are Professors [Sir Richard] Jebb, [Frederic?] Maitland, [Charles] Waldstein [later Walston], [James?] Ward, [Henry Francis?] Pelham, Andrew Lang, Henry Jackson, and James Bryce, and of Cambridge science men, [Sir Michael?] Foster, [Alfred?] Newton, [Sir Francis?] Darwin, [John Newport] Langley, [Adam?] Sedgwick.

Letter from W. J. Lewis to Lady Frazer

Trinity College, Cambridge - Is pleased to hear the news; will be away until the 9th; Professor [James?] Ward was run down by a motor the other day but Lewis hopes he has received no serious injury.

Letter from William James to J. G. Frazer

Lamb House, Rye, Sussex - Was in Cambridge to keep a promise to Mrs Myers, but did not have time to visit them; saw James Ward, was pained to find him so ill; the Edinburgh [Gifford] lectures went off well; is going to Nauheim, thence to Liverpool and home; was sorry to hear he cut his Italy trip short.

Accompanied by the envelope with the note, 'W. James on Gifford lectures &c.' in Frazer's hand.

Printed testimonial letter from James Ward

One of a set of four testimonial letters printed in support of Frazer's candidacy for the Librarianship of the Royal Geographical Society: Frazer has a keen interest in modern science, is 'proverbial in Trinity for his continuous industry and enduring "power of work"'. Accompanied by two duplicates.

Diary of a Tour in Spain

85 pp. diary of a train trip made with [James?] Ward from 13 March to 8 April 1883. While in Paris on the way there they attend a performance of "Fedora" starring the 'powerful' Sarah Bernhardt. Travelling via Toulouse, they arrive at the border where Frazer tastes Spanish food for the first time. From there they travel to Barcelona, with a long description of a side trip in which they climb Montserrat, to Tarragona and the monastery of Poblet, to València ('a most uninteresting town'), Córdoba (and a visit to the mosque there ), Granada (the Alhambra, cathedral, and Carthusian monastery), Seville (the Museo [de Bellas Artes de Sevilla], cathedral, and the Alcázar), Madrid (the Prado, a view of the King and Queen ['no cheering whatever'], and a trip to Toledo), Vittoria [Vitoria-Gasteiz], San Sebastián, Irun, thence in short order Biarritz, Bordeaux, Paris, Boulogne, Folkestone, London, and home to Cambridge.