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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866–1934), art historian, critic, and painter
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Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Was glad to get Bob's two letters and hear he had arrived safely at Milan. Forwarded some letters to Ravello on Sunday which Bob's mother had sent her, with 'a very kind note' [originally enclosed]; Bob is a 'naughty son' not to give her his Ravello address in time, and she will send it to her tomorrow. Thinks she would like Bob's mother to call her Elizabeth, as she asks; her English friends do, and then she will reserve 'Bessie' for 'more intimate purposes'. Also encloses a letter from [Alphonse] Grandmont which might entertain him, as might 'the bad poem in the beginning'. Is glad Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is being so helpful; shows he 'has regained his common sense' after quarrelling with Mademoiselle Thomley and getting 'away from under her influence', now he is 'much with the Dahlerups'. Hopes this letter will greet Bob on his arrival at Ravello, and that he enjoys 'all the good, beautiful things of life' there and gets some good work done. Asks if he remembered to give his letter to Mrs [Helen] Fry, and to buy himself some 'foreign paper' and a razor strop. If not she will have to think of him as 'a shaggy Robinson Crusoe-like poet' writing 'poems and love-letters on odd ends of paper... used by the peasants to wrap up their fruit'; has been enjoying seeing her own paper sent back 'bedabbled' with Bob's dear but 'very untidy and cook-like writing'. Had her photograph taken this morning; it happened so quickly that she did not have time to think 'what kind of simpering smile' would suit her best; will send Bob one. People keep asking to see Bob's photograph and are surprised when she does not have one.

Jeanne Salomonson stayed till Sunday morning. On Friday night Bessie's aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven]'s two sisters [Alida and Agatha] came to visit with a girl who is living with them for a while, 'a most horribly uninteresting dull & unartistic kind of being' who yet had the 'pretence of being very musical'. playing the piano abominably but trying 'the most difficult & beautiful things'; felt 'rubbed up the wrong way' when she went to bed, 'horribly sarcastic & terribly sour'. Mr Kattendijke came on Saturday to accompany Jeanne and they did some 'wonderful Brahms songs'; on Sunday they went to a piano recital by Harold Bauer which was partly quite good, but at the end he played 'such horrid firework things' that it nearly spoilt everything else and made him think less of him. Has had a nice letter from Madame Goriany, the Austrian lady Bob met at Roccabella [Taormina, Sicily]. Is working hard on the translation for Ambro [Hubrecht] about 'the absorption of fatty matter into the intestine'. Their cousins, the van Deldens, and their daughter are coming tonight; soon they are going south and then perhaps to the Dutch colonies. Has written to Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s mother about the violin, and is curious to know the answer.

Continues the letter next day: is going to spend the day in Leiden, first calling on a 'dear cousin' [Louise Hubrecht] who has known her since childhood and lunching with Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] at her mother's. Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht] appeared suddenly at dinner; an enormous whale was stranded on the coast two days ago, and he has secured it for his university [Utrecht]; she has been able to give back her translation as the usual man is well again; he says he has sent his 'American speech' to Ravello. A pity the Frys cannot visit [on the way back from Italy]; hopes to see them soon.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for sending "The Speaker" with her letter; likes his poem though does not feel she entirely understands it. Her uncle has taken her aunt out in a carriage for some fresh air and she feels much better for it. Spent Sunday in Amsterdam with the Röntgens who were all well and cheerful; called on [Bram] Eldering in the afternoon and arranged to have lessons once a fortnight; he seems to be 'full of fun & humour'. Yesterday went to see Louise [Hubrecht] and had a very good conversation with her; Louise thinks Maria van Hoeven should go to Ems or Wiesbaden for a few weeks for her health with a nurse, while her husband stayed at home with Bessie to look after him; afraid that her uncle and aunt will take a lot of persuading. Is writing to Bramine today to tell her their plan to marry at Whitsuntide and see if she can come. Mien [Abrahamina Röntgen] is working some beautiful sheets and pillowcases, with embroidery and her own lace, to give them as a wedding present. Bessie is also practising the viola which they brought from Leiden so she can accompany the Brahms songs with Mr Kattendijke; today he sent an etching of a Dutch landscape as a wedding present. Hopes to be able to go to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture tomorrow, then on Monday there is a Röntgen and Messchaert concert, though since Messchaert is at Wiesbaden and not yet well this might be cancelled. There is a Vondel exhibition at Amsterdam; wishes that they could go together. Asks how the Frys are. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother, also a note from Dorothy Fletcher saying they were sorry to have missed Bob and Bessie's call.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking - Begins the letter on his first night at the Mill House, an 'event of some importance'; describes the 'confusion' in the house, with most of his books still packed in their cases; has just undone two parcels of books from the Bohn library, a recent bargain purchase: sixty Bohns for seven pounds; puns on Ezekiel 37 and the 'valley of dry bones', though the books are not really too dry, and there are translations of Pushkin's tales and Hoffmann's "Serapion" which are quite new to him. Is going for a long walk of exploration this afternoon; hopes to reach the top of Leith Hill; must go and call on the [Paget?] Bowmans some day. Had an excellent game at Harrow last Thursday, just beating the School; [rugby] football is his 'chief... vanity'; they then forgot their injuries 'over the Headmaster's champagne', and he saw many old friends. A couple of days later, saw his greatest school-friend, just back from three years in India as a civil servant, 'a bit fat, but otherwise... not changed much'; does not believe 'nice people' do change much, at least until they 'begin to get senile'. George Moore believes most people 'soon begin to deteriorate', but he is a pessimist. Promises to send her some of his poetry next time. A pity the house at Doorn came to nothing; sympathises with Grandmont's exasperation at a wasted trip around the country. Has written to thank Paul [Hubrecht], who need not have returned his umbrella. Thinks he will get on well with his German when he begins in earnest. Thanks for the information from Grandmont about "Eulenspiegel", which he will share with Langley when they next meet. McTaggart is certainly 'a very interesting and original being, and perhaps the wittiest in Cambridge", though Bob does not think his philosophy sound; has not yet seen his Daisy. Understands her difficulty in talking with the Frys about their 'common friend, that wretched poet', but Fry said nice things about them all and Bessie in particular. Sorry to think of her 'wandering sadly round the country, like Jephthah's daughter' saying goodbye to all the places she knew; will try and write again soon since she is unhappy. Had no chance to show Bramine's sketches to his mother but will do this later; the war is a 'beastly business' but he is glad that 'more sensible people' than he at first though consider that it could have been avoided.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is glad that Bessie thinks their plan [to meet] so easy and that he 'overrated the difficulties' on her side; still thinks it may be better for him to go on to Italy after seeing her, saving the expense and 'beastliness' of two crossings and making him more likely to catch the Frys at Siena. Has always been able to work at Ravello, and doubts he will do much until he goes abroad. She must decide when he should come, and for how long; would like not to start before 11 November as he has promised to play [rugby] football then, but 'even the Sacred Olympian Games must give way , if necessary'. Says that he hates 'romance, at least in real life', and would not like her to be a 'Juliett, even if it were possible'; discusses Rostand's play "Les Romanesques", in which two lovers are not satisfied until their fathers fake a Romeo and Juliet style quarrel; thinks it more perfect than "Cyrano [de Bergerac]". Has not read "La Samaritaine"; thinks he would not care for it, as "[w]hen a Frenchman gets hold of J[esus] C[hrist] he usually makes him ridiculous", though it is 'bound to be clever and amusing'; Sanger saw 'Sally B [Sarah Bernhardt]' in it. Of Rostand's tragedies, has only read "La Princesse Lontaine"; thinks it a better play than "Cyrano". General thoughts about Rostand's plays and characters; he is 'a very charming person, and though dreadfully French [not] offensively so'. Glad Bessie liked his poem 'about Nothing at all' [see 9/80]; questions her objection to his translation of a line in the Ronsard poem, since she knows French much better than he does. The 'Indian poem' is part of a long one of which he has written the beginning and the fragment he sent; is not satisfied with it at all. Explains the correct English use of "shall" and "will". Has just seen an evening paper with an account of the disaster at Ladysmith [during the Second Boer War]; thinks it is the worst reverse the British army have had this century; resembles 'certain events in the War of American Independence' and this war is 'nearly as foolish and unnecessary'. Discusses possible results. Bessie is right that his father has fine eyes; thinks she would like him; he is very like Bob, 'only with more virtues and common sense, and fewer absurdities'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel Biscione, Piazza Fontana, Milano. - Arrived at Milan yesterday afternoon; found the Frys at this hotel so also changed, but his letters will be sent on from the Suisse. Apologises for not writing that evening. The Frys are very well, and are going out with him now to see pictures and churches; he will write properly this evening. Hopes she does not miss him too much; agrees that they have had 'a wonderful time together' and that it is harder for her than for him since at least he is travelling; promises not to forget her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Asks if someone could book him a room at the Twee Steden, or the Angleterre if that is not possible; she need not come to meet him at the station since he will arrive so late. Berenson has given him a list of Russian books in translation to read. His mother says they should decide themselves whether he should accompany to England, and do as her uncle and aunt think right. Does hope she will be able to come on the 14th and spend some time at Welcombe. The Frys have got them a ring. Hopes her aunt is still better, as he could not bear not to see Bessie, will shave away the bristles from the journey so that they can pay each other some of their 'debt of K[isses]'.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Bri[tish] Mus[eum] Lib[rary]. - Is staying at Hare Court till Wednesday, when [Charles] Sanger starts for Greece; he is no better yet. Wrote to Aunt M[eg Price] about the piano suggesting 'delicately' that they might make an exchange [of an upright for a grand] one day; thinks it will be all right. Went on his bicycle to Dorking to see the Frys, and saw Laurence Binyon and another friend, with whom he went up Leith Hill. Has got on quite well with his play recently. Would like to see Bessie in her 'new spectacles, like a professor'; Curry & Paxton say Ambro [Hubrecht]'s spectacles are ready, asks whether he is to send them or bring them over. Thinks "Wuthering Heights" 'altogether more wonderful' than anything Charlotte [Bronte] wrote, though he does not 'depreciate Villette etc'. Forgot to take the measurements of the table but will as soon as he returns. Teases Bessie about her old fondness for 'the Sweedish [sic] Inst. doctor' [see 9/37]

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Sorry to hear about Bessie's cold; hopes it has now gone. Has discovered some 'wonderful woodland places in the valley... the woods here are quite endless'. Impatiently waiting for spring; is usually in Italy in February and March. She should read Flaubert's letters; he expresses several things Bob feels but is 'too lazy' or lacks the power to explain. Is having difficulty getting into the right frame of mind to work, but thinks he has made his play better by his alterations. Has been reading some Heine and [Goethe's] "Faust" in German, but cannot really spare enough time for it. Much interested in the 'domestic politics' Bessie mentions, and would like to meet some more of her half-sisters; expects he will when he comes to the Netherlands soon. Asks her to thank her uncle for his kind letter; would like to leave the question of the post-marriage celebrations to her and her father; is always 'rather afraid of formal speeches and ceremonies' but would not object if they wanted it. Wonders how she likes "Wuthering Heights"; for him 'crude as it is in some ways... it beats almost all English novels'. Is pleased that [Alfred] Enticknap has got a permanent place at a nearby house, though he will still be able to do some work for him and even the Frys, who say he is a 'firstclass gardener'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is soon starting for Paddington to catch the train to Cornwall. Yesterday, heard [Roger] Fry's last lecture and saw the Sickerts, then went to Holman Hunt's. They were 'very nice, and so was their beautiful daughter, Gladys'; though Hunt is sometimes a little tedious. Mrs Holman Hunt would like to meet Bessie. Draws an eye to look at her and lips to kiss her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very pleased that Elizabeth and Robert will come to Glasgow [for the International Exhibition]; hopes it will be cooler by the 29th; has written to book rooms at the Windsor Hotel. Suggests returning to Wallington on Wednesday; [Roger] Fry will come on the 1st or 2nd August. Asks if Elizabeth would like her Dutch papers to be forwarded.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth finds her 'new quarters' comfortable. Has reserved rooms at the Windsor Hotel in Glasgow, and thinks she will come on the early train arriving between 2 and 3 in the afternoon; thought of going to the E[xhibition] that afternoon for a first sight, and wonders when Elizabeth and Robert can be there. Hopes it will not get too hot again until they have left Glasgow. Does not think Elizabeth's [Dutch news]paper is coming now.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] came out just after everyone had left Cambridge, but George will do 'all [he] can for it next term'. Likes it 'so very much', and has ordered six copies to give as presents. Thinks Roger [Fry's] illustrations 'very romantic and beautiful', and that they 'illustrated and explained & enlarged the idea of the poems a great deal'. Discusses the poems; thinks "The [Lady's] Bat" 'much the best thing' Bob has done, and 'in the way the most serious'. Lord Rosebery's speech 'a funny business': he 'said things that any Pro Boer would have been lynched for saying' after criticising pro-Boers 'more strongly than anyone'; George hopes what he says will 'get into common parlance'. Says that he himself 'went mad for two months last autumn... and saw men as idiots walking'; he wrote 'an exceedingly mad article... in which a lot of truth was buried in a hopeless amount of bunkum'; hopes Bob will not judge him on it if he sees it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Old Hotel, Dungeon Ghyll, Langdale, Nr. Ambleside. - Bob and Roger [Fry] will be pleased that a 'memorial [memorandum] about Finland" which is soon to be sent to the Duma [Russian Parliament] has been much signed by British MPs. Has had a long talk with Cecil Spring Rice, the British minister at Stockholm - not [his relative] Tom - who knows about the affair as the 'Swedes are so deeply interested'. There is some hope that the 'change may be of a more limited character than is threatened'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St. - Bob's 'old woman' [housekeeper] told him when he returned [from Italy?] that a 'young man in a cab with a portmanteau' called when he was away; seems that Edward 'appeared at no 14 [home of Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn Davies] hunting for a lunch'; hopes he found 'a friend or restaurant in time' as he knows his friend needs 'constant supplies... to stave off dissolution', like moles which cannot go without worms for more than twelve hors. Went round to Bruton Street yesterday, but found that Edward had gone back on Sunday; this means he missed meeting 'a rose of Shiraz, the direct descendant of the one which intoxicated Hafiz... You would have had this rose, had you been here' but instead Bob 'took it round to [Roger] Fry, who fell violently in love with it, and fell to painting it' [this appears to refer to the first meeting between Fry and his future wife Helen Coombe]. Supposes Edward is caught up in 'the last act' of his academical careers [final exams]; he should not be 'despondent and doubtful'. Tells Edward to excuse his 'sermons', but not his spelling, as he swears 'never to look at or correct' a letter to him again, 'after the outrageous fables' Edward circulated about his 'beautiful and chaste letters from Italy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava (written on printed notepaper for the Hôtel de Londres, Gênes - crossed out). - Marsh's letter gave Bob much pleasure, since the 'stupid people at Naples' have not yet sent his first on; his address 'hints fascinating suggestions of rustic English scenery, and milk drunk and mild-maids beflirted in dairies'. Asks if Marsh is alone, or whether this letter is '"solus ad solum", as Flaubert used to write to Maxime Ducamp'. Read [William?] Archer's review of the plays produced by the Independent Theatre [Society] in the "Pall Mall Budget", and supposes it was 'in some slight degree inspired by' Marsh's; hopes this 'wonderful pale-faced black-haired [man: Lugné-Poe, see 15/322]' will still be in London when he returns at the end of the month; asks if it was Titian's portrait of Ariosto Marsh was reminded of. Has read Maeterlinck's "Intruse"; did not feel anything strongly for the writer, but would not like to have written the play: did not think the 'poetical or romantic element to which realism was totally sacrificed... was not quite good enough', that Maeterlink was 'not the right man to do it well, but that he could imaging 'a real poet doing something very wonderful in that line'. Glad Oswald [Sickert] 'has seen the last of those Beautiful Englanders' ["Beautiful Britain", published by the Werner Company]; remembers Marsh talking about Sickert's second novel a while ago and thought he had said it was finished, so asks whether this is a third. Asks whether [Stanley] Makower's book is out yet.

Marsh seems 'to have been going the round of our distinguished men pretty thoroughly'; makes Bob 'writhe with envy to read your account; would particularly like to see [Robert] Bridges, and means to make Roger [Fry], Bridges' nephew, take him one day. Has a book of Bridges' verse with him here, which is 'very readable and at times very beautiful'; Fry is 'enthusiastic' about him, and reads Bob passages aloud from "Prometheus [the Firegiver]"; Bob thinks 'a calmness and gentleness of tone and harmony about him... seems to make him a sort of painters poet'; hopes Marsh was 'not badly shown up' for his 'neglect' of Bridges' recent books. A man called [Henry Charles] Beeching lives with Bridges [he in the Rectory at Yattendon, Bridges in the manor house there; Beeching married Bridge's niece] and 'has just published a volume of milky poetry for which Roger has done a frontispiece' ["In a Garden and Other Poems"]; Roger says they quarrel with each other 'off and on in a mild chronic sort of way'. Asks whether Marsh saw Beeching.

Is living an 'ideal sort of life here'; describes his daily routine of exercise, study and meals; he eats omelettes, risotto, 'some wonderful things they call fritelli', for which he gives instructions and states his intention to continue making them in England. His work is 'just as mysterious' to himself as it is to Marsh; does not have the 'faintest idea what it is going to turn out' as; the plot is a 'puzzle' to him, the style is he knows 'vicious and unnatural as a rule' though he hopes it is good sometimes, and the important thing is to get it finished. Has the greatest difficulty finding names for his characters; his hero is called Benedict, 'an awfull name... which mercifully shortens into Bendy'. Badly wants a name for 'a sort of Jim Stephen who has not gone mad' but has achieved nothing due to 'an incorrigible laziness and want of enterprise'; he is in danger of losing his wife to the hero. Bob was just creating a character called Paul who was turning out 'without my intending it, uncommonly like you'; Marsh's letter has made him realise with 'horror' what he was doing and he may have to take Paul out. The character is engaged to a very charming girl who is like someone Bob knows. Hopes to be back in England in about three weeks; intends to 'plunge into an incredible carreer of gluttony [sic] and Pantegruelizing'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürren is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Lake] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looks forward to discussing his book ["The American Revolution", Volume II] with Robert when it is read. The preliminary reviews are good, and the longer reviews in 'the great provincial papers' are 'most satisfactory'. He and Caroline are very distressed about the [Roger] Frys. They have had a 'famous old Harrovian shooting party': [Lord?] Ridley, [Lord?] Belper, Kenelm Digby, Charles and Sir George; good to increase 'old friendships, which had been loosened by politics for so long a time'. Belper is 'great fun, a humourist of a rough and strong sort' and a 'wonderful man of public business'; he took up an old argument about whether Sir George should have left him a gun-bag in Ireland exactly as it was left 41 years ago. Glad the plans for Robert and Elizabeth's new house are 'in fair train'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.

Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to [Jean Marchand]

On headed notepaper of the National Liberal Club, Victoria Street, S.W.1. - On returning to London, he talked to Ruth Fry, Roger's sister, who is the president of the 'Mission des Amis' [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. She said that communication with Russia was very difficult at the moment, but that if Marchand wants to arrange to get his niece [actually Olga Lewitska, daughter of Sonia Lewitska -see 22/56] out of Ukraine, it would be best to write to [Maxim] Litvinoff at the Hotel Cosmopolite, Copenhagen, asking for his help and advice as the one responsible for admitting foreigners to Russia and getting them out. Ruth Fry doubted that Litvinoff would consent to helping with such a case, but it might perhaps still be worth trying, and strongly suspected that it would not be possible to get the girl out. Might be possible to send letters to Kiev through Litvinoff.

Trevelyan will write to [Francis] Birrell to go and see Marchand as soon as he arrives in Paris; Roger Fry will also give his advice when he arrives. If it is better to send a letter as soon as possible, advises him to write to Litvinoff and send that letter to Trevelyan, who will ask Ruth Fry to send it as she is in communication with Litvinoff; this may make him pay more attention to the matter. Necessary to decide before writing whether they want to try and get Marchand's niece out of the Ukraine, or simply to send letters. Wishes he could give more definitive advice, but will do his best to help if he sends a letter. Marchand knows how much Trevelyan is sorry for the pain Madame Marchand [Sonia Lewitska] is experiencing at the moment, and how much he would like to help if he could.

Memorandum by R. C. Trevelyan regarding his friendship with Roger Fry

Brief account of how Fry inspired a love of art in Trevelyan (previously, like "most Cambridge men.. completely ignorant of art') when they shared a house in Chelsea, and of Fry's life and character. Describes Virginia Woolf's biography of Fry as giving 'a very fully account of him, which seems... not only imaginative and sympathetic, but just and true'.

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