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Trevelyan, Paul (1906-1909), son of Elizabeth and Robert Calverley Trevelyan
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to have the news of the birth of Elizabeth and Robert's son; wants to know how much he weighs and so on; hopes the labour was not too hard. Wonders if Robert 'has ventured to hold the baby'; he must start when it is small. The hounds [the local hunt] have been here this morning and she and Sir George went out to them; looked 'very pretty'. Asks whether they have decided the baby's name is to be Paul; Sir George likes it. Amusing to think of the 'three boy cousins' [with Theodore and George Lowthian Trevelyan] so close in age.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has received Paul's present of 'muisjes' [sugared aniseeds given in the Netherlands after the birth of a baby] from Elizabeth and Robert; Caroline has told him about them; Booa [Mary Prestwich] was 'immensely pleased with hers'. They are now settled down; thinks he and Booa want some 'rest and quiet'. The hounds came yesterday, which is very different in Warwickshire from in Northumberland as it is 'one of the famous "Shires"'; the hunt 'made a gallant show in the amphitheatre of the home park'. Would be 'bad hunting' at the Shiffolds, but he would still enjoy it.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Elizabeth has a good Christmas day with her baby; she should 'feel it a duty to be quite idle'. Sir George is recovering; will take him for a walk this morning; was 'a feverish cold... like something caught in a London fog'. They have had many congratulations on the birth of Paul. Sure Gussie [Enticknap] 'would be astonished to see another baby quite suddenly appear'. She and Sir George are having lunch early, so the servants will be able 'to sit over their dinners' and 'have dessert & crackers &c' and have fun. Thanks Robert for writing twice, though his letters arrived together; the post is 'most erratic' and the postman needs a cart and horse as there are so many parcels. Has started the year's accounts. Sir George was amused by the muisjes [see 10/69]. Asks whether Jan [Hubrecht?] has been to see Paul yet.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sure Elizabeth is glad to be in bed in this cold weather, though since there was sunshine yesterday and today she and Sir George have taken some walks. The nurse has kindly written a long letter with much she wanted to know about Elizabeth and Paul. Is very glad to hear the nursing [breastfeeding] has begun so well; Mary and Pauline were both 'troublesome' though the boys [Theodore and George Lowthian] were not. Longs to see Elizabeth and Paul but must wait, as both she and Sir George are going to be careful not to catch chills. Has been busy with the accounts, and has 'embarked on another large Vol. of Sorel'. Asks if Elizabeth has had visitors yet; sure Miss Noel will be delighted. Janet is coming on 7 January, and her mother the next day; 'rather alarmed' at the thought of having Mrs Ward for 'two whole days'. Asks if Paul has been out yet; likes the idea of him 'being carried up and down the Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst?] Terrace which is so sheltered & sunny'. Long holiday at Stratford, with Christmas, bank holiday and local holiday; there has been tobogganing on the hill behind the house, and the pond will soon be frozen enough for skating.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear Julian has gained so much weight, and that Elizabeth has recovered her strength so quickly. Interesting that Elizabeth's sister and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen are coming. She and Sir George are leaving this morning 'in truly patriarchal fashion' since the 'Chelsea nursery' [George and Janet's children: Mary, Theodore and Humphry] join them at the station. Is thinking of Paul today: believes they will 'see him in Julian', who will therefore be 'doubly precious'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad that Elizabeth has got to Broadstairs and is in a hotel, which is much more restful; the weather is also improving, after being very bad. G[eorge] and J[anet] came from Leamington in a snow storm on the 15th; they are enjoying themselves and resting here, though Janet has been to London for the day; she seems to have many 'irons in the fire' and never gets tired. Sir George got a bad cold at the end of last week, perhaps because they are 'of course economising fuel'; the doctor came and he is nearly recovered. Wonders whether Elizabeth 'would think him much older'; she does sometimes and then he is 'quite himself again'. Supposes Julian will got back to school early in May; Hopes Elizabeth will come and visit before they go north; they will stay here through May. Asks if Bob shows 'any sign of coming home'. Keeps thinking of 'that sad time at Broadstairs' [the death of Paul Trevelyan?] and is very glad Elizabeth has Julian with her; sends him 5 shillings to spend, as 'seaside shops are always rather fascinating to children'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Will send back some of Robert's books: the Chaucer; Conrad's "Lord Jim", which Sir George has read before; and Belloc's book, which Caroline 'can manage better' than Sir George. Arthur Sidgwick, who is 'very well and cheerful', and his wife are here; there has been much toboganning down the hills behind the house by 'all the very large pleasure society of Stratford', though now snow and Stratfordians are gone. Delighted to have news of Elizabeth and the baby [Paul]; Aunt Annie [Philips] is very pleased at the news; she is at Palermo and has been to Segesta, which was a hard journey of eleven hours.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Grateful for the detailed information about Bessy and Paul. Has been reading about 'little Paul in Dombey' [Dickens's "Dombey and Son"]; thinks it the 'best account of a child' in literature which he knows, even better than "David Copperfield"; contrasts it with 'a clever, self-conscious woman or man writing about a child' like George Elliot on the Tullivers [in "Mill on the Floss"]. Thanks God that Paul Trevelyan will have a 'better constitution' than Paul Dombey. Sends an 'amusing letter' from [William?] Everett, which Robert need not return; Everett lacks 'front' and is 'at once the youngest and the oldest of human beings'. Is reading [Plautus's] "Trinummus" slowly, as he is getting tired over the end of his book ["The American Revolution"].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - The hard weather has 'carried off quite a group of [Sir George's] old London friends', leaving the same sort of gap as was left in his college circle by the deaths of Bowen, [Henry] Sidgwick and Edward Young. Goschen, Davey, Godfrey Lushington, and Allendale ([Wentworth] Beaumont) have all died within about a fortnight. Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] much enjoyed their visit to the Shiffolds and meeting Paul. Was very lucky not to break his hip; is still lame. The Lords have 'a reform bill of their own House'; the "Times" seems not to think this is the business of the Commons, which is 'all very well if the same theory is adopted reciprocally' but they threw out the Plural Voting bill last year.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to have good news of Bessie and Paul; they look forward to seeing them all soon. Caroline has sent for [E. M. Forster's] "The Longest Journey", and Sir George will read it after his current novel. What Robert says about the Apostles inspires him to send some 'scraps... unearthed' when sifting old letters; Cowell was an 'ideal personage... a man who carried camaraderie to the highest point in [their] set and generation'. [Henry] Jackson persuaded Sir George to 'take over my MA' since the University may someday want a Liberal representative. Has nothing to do, and is very tired after sixteen consecutive months of work, including two of illness; the proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"] will be a pleasure. Sends best wishes to Bertie Russell.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - The Leith Hill hotel is a 'very ideal caravansary' and must bring Robert and Elizabeth good company; glad Sidney Colvin admired Paul; is very keen to see him again. Met Jan [Hubrecht] in the street in London and 'mistook him for Hilton Young... no ill compliment'. Jan said it happened to him 'constantly' at Cambridge. Is halfway through his proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"]; glad they will be alone until it is finished. Staying with them have been: Welby; Tom Brassey and his wife; 'the beautiful Lady Carew'; Lady Reay; Bernard and Mrs Mallet; Alfred Lyall. Is halfway through "Dombey" [Charles Dickens's "Dombey and Son"] and is reading other things such as Beugnot's "Memoirs", placed first in interest by Ferdinand de Rothschild 'the great authority on French memoirs'; Beugnot knew '"at home" the Diamond Necklace gang'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have news of Paul; the photograph of him touching Theodore's foot is 'delicious'. The new MP for Hexham, [Richard Durning] Holt and his wife, are staying at Wallington, as are: Aunt Annie [Philips]; Josephine Lawson; the younger Hugh Bell, in whom Sir George has 'discovered a great likeness to [Edward] Bowen' and thinks it 'extends to character'; and Sir Francis Blake. He and Caroline are 'much interested about [Laurence] Binyon'; wonders if [Sidney?] Colvin thinks he is 'breaching on Stephen Phillips's domain'. Glad Robert liked what he saw of [Macaulay's] "Marginal Notes", which Sir George has now typed up; Longmans are going to publish it.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Robert is reading his book [Volume III of "The American Revolution"]; asks him to tell him about mistakes or misprints; the book seems 'well subscribed for'. Sorry to hear about Paul and glad he is better. Sends love to Elizabeth; he and Caroline are interested in the marriage between [Arthur] Richmond and [Theodora] van Riemsdijk. Caroline is in London for a few days; he has his 'very old, and tall, friend Sir Steuart Bailey' to keep him company. Sir Walter and Lady Trevelyan 'turned up on a motor journey yesterday' so he gave them tea; Sir Walter is 'immensely improved in manner and bearing' and she is a 'bright little lady'. Is interested by the 'Wattses [paintings by G. F. Watts?] at Compton'; does not know 'who has Compton [Watts's house there?]'

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Agrees that Robert should not be in a hurry to act about Taormina [the legacy in Florence Trevelyan's will]. Would like to hear his ideas about anything in the book [Sir George's third volume of "The American Revolution"]; agrees with him in liking the last two chapters best and is prepared to write another volume 'in that style, and on those topics' if he lives another five years. Sends love to Paul and Bessie; very glad they are well.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Grand Hôtel Continental, Siena. - Rather 'arctic' in Siena; Hilda Trevelyan has been staying here a while and will come to tea tonight; she is leaving tomorrow. He and Caroline enjoyed Florence very much; all the new building is in the suburbs so the 'essential part of the city' is not at all spoiled. They had a good visit to the Berensons, whose house must be good to stay in. Supposes Robert is at Cambridge today. Sends love to Elizabeth, with assurances of their interest in Paul and his 'troubles'; made friends with a 'lovely little Italian baby' in a street near the Duomo yesterday. Has read about the Sicilian property [left to Robert by Florence Trevelyan, but only after her husband's death]; does not feel great confidence and dislikes the way the will was arranged in Sicily rather than by the Trustees' lawyer, which benefits Dr Cacciola; however, Robert 'is in good hands,' and his financial prospects mean he need not 'undertake certain worry for an uncertain prospective gain'. Is very interested in the third volume of [Guglielmo] Ferrero's ["The Greatness and Decline of Rome": "The Fall of An Aristocracy"] and has Cicero's "Philippics" with him. Currently reading the "Heauton Timorumenos" [Terence's "The Self-Tormentor"], which is a 'rattling comedy'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Palace Hotel, Rome. - Sorry to hear about the fall of the cedar and the little dog's death; Elizabeth must be sad. Glad about Paul; had never noticed how much 'gymnastics' a year old child does pulling itself onto its feet until Geordie was around them this autumn. They have been out to the Appian Way to lunch, and spent a morning going over the grounds of the Villa Mills on the Palatine which is to be pulled down for excavations. Always thinks of Robert at the Farnese casino on the Clivus Victoriae, where he had the 'altercation with the friend of the custode'. Has read [Cicero's] Philippics, inspired by Ferrero, and has 'rarely enjoyed a book more'; also delighting in reading Terence. Glad to hear what [James Stoddart?] Bain told Robert; there are beginning to be signs that the book [Volume III of "The American Revolution"] is a success and is doing well in America, though it came out in the midst of an unprecedented 'financial tornado'. Their hotel is quite full of 'very quiet, respectable Americans', most of whom are ladies.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is watching the developments [surrounding Florence Trevelyan's legacy to Robert] 'with a friendly, but not a critical eye'. He and Caroline have also had 'vile weather' but have suffered no physical harm; glad the same is true of Elizabeth and Paul. Agrees with [Benjamin] Rogers about [Racine's] "Plaideurs"; thought it 'very poor stuff' when he read it as a boy 'to illustrate [Aristophanes's] the "Wasps"'. They have just finished the Queen's letters ["The Letters of Queen Victoria", edited by A C Benson]; there is much that is interesting 'embedded in a vast mass of twaddle': too much is included by 'so many royalties... not above the average of their class', and though the Queen's letters are often 'very human and spicy' the book should have been half the length. Agrees with Robert that the Mid-Devon [Ashburton] election should shake the [Liberal] party up. Hilda and Audrey Trevelyan have been staying.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear they are all well; Caroline sends love; a 'cuckoo for ever calling here' makes him think of 'the dear little boy' [Paul] and of 'Will Shakespeare'. They have just finished Hogg [his life of Shelley], and thinks more of Hogg 'in his queer way' than ever; has been reading a Macmillan edition of Shelley: 'What a poet!'. Has read [Roger] Fry's article in the Burlington Magazine, and paid a second visit to the illuminated manuscripts [exhibition at the Burlington Fine Arts Club] yesterday before leaving London; has also looked through the British Museum facsimiles here and at Grosvenor Crescent. Hopes Fry's wife will 'go on satisfactorily'. The 'Doctorate business' [his forthcoming honorary degree at Cambridge] is 'very plain sailing': Lord Halsbury, Lord Rayleigh, and Sir James Ramsey will also be staying at [Trinity College] Lodge; they lunch at [Gonville &] Caius, whose Master [Ernest Roberts] is Vice Chancellor. Others receiving honorary degrees are: the Duke of Northumberland; Admiral Sir John Fisher; Charles Parsons; Sir James Ramsay; Sir W[illiam] Crookes; Professor Lamb; Professor Marshall; Asquith; Lord Halsbury; Sir Hubert Herkomer; Sir Andrew Noble; Rudyard Kipling; Professor Living; they will 'advance on the Senate House...like the English at Trafalgar'. in two columns. Is looking forward to dinner in the hall at Trinity. Went to Harrow on Tuesday and will tell Robert about it and about the 'Cacciola affair'.

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