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Letters replying to invitations to Trinity College feasts

146 letters, most of them replies to invitations to dinner, with a few concerning arrangements to stay in rooms in College for the night, sent to the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, or specifically to Henry Montagu Butler, John Walton Capstick, Hugh McLeod Innes, or William Aldis Wright. An original letter of invitation may be found as part of item 65.

Thirteen of the letters concern other matters related to Trinity College business, as described below.
Items 9-11: Blomfield, Sir Arthur William. Asks to use the College Hall for lunch for the Royal Academy Club annual excursion, June 1899
Item 19: Dalzell, Robert Harris Carnwath, 11th Earl of Carnwath. 7 Jan. 1899. Remittance for fees, deducting a fine incurred by his son which should be paid for by the culprit
Item 40: Devonshire, Duke of. Undated. Contribution to the Trinity College, Cambridge Mission Appeal.
Items 61-62: Jebb, Sir Richard Claverhouse. 1896, 1898. Encloses payment for his subscription to the Trinity College Mission and the Cambridge House
Item 84: Parry, Sir Charles Hubert Hastings, 1st Baronet. 1898. Encloses payment for dues
Items 100-101: Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred. 25 Mar. and 1 May 1899, encloses lists of students and other women from Newnham who would like to attend the Rayleigh lecture
Item 108: Stanton, Vincent Henry. 3 Sept. n.y. Concerning the opening times of the Trinity College Library
Item 123: Webster, Richard Everard, 1st Viscount Alverstone. 19 July 1897. Encloses cheque for subscription.
Item 126: Whitehead, Alfred North. 21 Oct. n.y. To Capstick, asks for questions for the General Question paper

One letter appears to be personal, not Trinity College business: item 90, sent to John William Capstick by Georg Hermann Quincke 15 July 1896, who writes about electric currents, citing articles, and describing his overcrowded laboratory (in German).

Correspondence of Ramanujan and miscellaneous correspondence relating to his life and works

Correspondents include Ramanujan himself, J E Littlewood, G N Watson, G H Hardy, A S Ramalingam, F Dewsbury, J J Hensman, S Lakshmi Narasimhan, K Ramunni Menon, K Ananda Rao, P V Seshu Ayyar and H Heilbronn.

Also includes minutes of the congratulatory meeting held in honour of Ramanujan and K Ananda Rao.

Drawing of John Wordsworth at a lectern with three students at a desk in front of him

Pen-and-ink sketch, with caption at top, "John Wordsworth, Greek lecturer on Thorpes' [Thomas Thorp's] side, Trinity College -- HSB pinxit". HSB is possibly Henry Stapylton Bree, who died 14 May 1836 at Trinity. Three figures in front of Wordsworth are drawn from the back and identified by surname: Howes, Maurice, Maitland [Thomas Chubb Howes, possibly Mowbray Morris and John Gorham Maitland]. With three more lines of names below: Bree, Bowes, Byles, Macgregor, Ritchie, Sugden, Busk, ? , Neat, Waldegrave, Joy, Adcock, and Grant. These students were all admitted in 1834 and 1835 and are possibly Bree himself, Edmund Elford Bowes, James Byles, Walter Grant James Macgrigor, William Ritchie, Frank Sugden, Hans Busk, Richard Henry Neate, William Frederick Waldegrave, William Joy, Halford Henry Adcock, and Alexander Grant.

Bree, Henry Stapylton (1817-1836), student

Letter from Robert Erskine Childers to Ivor Lloyd-Jones, with provenance letter

A farewell letter written immediately before his death: 'Dearest Ivor, It doesn't matter what you think of me. I know you love me -- the first friendship in my life & indestructable. So in lieu of goodbye & from my heart & soul God bless you & Gwladys & her daughter & give you great happiness. Erskine'.

Accompanied by a letter from Ivor Lloyd-Jones to Norman de Bruyne dated 27 June 1935 donating this letter and [his copy of 'The Riddle of the Sands'] to Trinity College Library, Cambridge.

Childers, Robert Erskine (1870-1922), author and politician

Two illuminations done when Hardy was a child

Two drawings, "Ye crowning of ye Jarl Harold" showing Harold's coronation as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry, and an illuminated manuscript page of the beginning of the Ten Commandments. Accompanied by an envelope which identifies these as illuminations done in childhood.

Letter from Isaac Barrow to the Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge

Pera, Constant[ino]politanae - After an apology for the long delay in writing to the Fellowship, Barrow gives an account of his travels from Paris, with a description of his stay in Florence, prolonged because of the plague in Naples, which was predicted to spread to Rome whither he had planned to go next; heeding the warning that if caught by the plague he would not be able to leave, and it proving too difficult to reach Venice, he embarks on a ship to Constantinople. He describes the present state of affairs under the Grand Vizier, Koprulu Mehmed Pasha, who had come to power two years earlier: his work to restore the Ottoman name at home and abroad, recovering the islands of Tenedos and Lemnos, repelling an attack by the Venetian fleet, suppressing a revolt in Moldavia and Wallachia by removing their princes, repressing the infighting threatening the prestige of the empire, most recently undertaking an expedition to Transylvania on the pretext that Prince Ragotzy, a Turkish subject, had invaded Poland hoping to take the kingdom for himself. Barrow predicts that Christendom will find in the Grand Vizier its worst enemy and describes his punishment of Parthenius, the Patriarch of the Greek Church, who was accused of intrigue with the Duke of Muscovy despite the commonly held view that the accusations were false, and who was hanged and left on display in his Pontifical robes as a deterrent to plotters. Barrow closes with a promise to return to Cambridge within the year.

Docketed by William Derham, "Paper. 1. Dr Barrows Lr ...to the Fellows of Trin. Col. Cambridge from Constantinople. Caland August 1658. Publ. Lr 1. W.Ds.'

Barrow, Isaac (1630-1677), mathematician and theologian

Letter from Lady Pethick-Lawrence to Lord Pethick-Lawrence

Fourways (Gomshall, Surrey).—May has gone to stay with Dorothy. Discusses the food shortage, the weather, and the garden. Is pleased that Lady Cripps is going to join Sir Stafford, and hopes that Pethick-Lawrence will be able to return with them.

(Letter-head of 11 Old Square.)

(Letter-head of 11 Old Square.)

Pethick-Lawrence Papers

  • PETH
  • Arquivo
  • 1825-1970

This collection contains, firstly, the surviving contents of the Pethick-Lawrences’ correspondence files, including letters from, and copies of letters to, a wide range of politicians and public figures. It also contains papers relating to the Lawrence family and the early life of F. W. Lawrence; articles and scripts of talks by Lord Pethick-Lawrence; correspondence between the Pethick-Lawrences themselves; papers of Lady Constance Lytton; papers relating to the separation of the Pethick-Lawrences from the Women’s Social and Political Union; and papers relating to prison conditions. The collection includes particularly notable material on the subjects of Indian independence, the suffrage movement, and other aspects of social reform.

Lawrence, Frederick William Pethick- (1871-1961), 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence, politician

Letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Emmeline Pankhurst

The Waldorf-Astoria, New York.—She and her husband have long been aware that the Government might attack them financially, and remain willing to sacrifice everything for the movement and to continue to be jointly responsible, with Mrs Pankhurst and others, for its future. As for militancy, they have never allowed their individual interests to stand in the way of the WSPU, and never will.

—————

Transcript

The Waldorf-Astoria, New York
Sept 22 1912.

Dear Mrs Pankhurst

We found your letter awaiting us on our arrival here. We have read it carefully & thoughtfully. We quite understand that it is a purely business letter, endorsing the views of our responsible colleagues with regard to the present situation & its effect upon us—& we reply in the same spirit of deliberation.

Perhaps you are not aware that the present position does not take my husband or me by surprise. Before putting our hand to the plough we were bound of course to consider every aspect of the matter & the Government’s policy of attacking us financially was discussed between us. We have therefore faced the situation already. But we appreciate the fact that you have faced it on our behalf during the past weeks, & that you are anxious to find a way out for us in order to spare us further sacrifice.

Our answer today is the same as it has been since we entered the struggle. You will realize directly we state it that there is only one answer possible. It is the answer which you yourself would give if asked to choose between the Movement (which you & we have in so large a measure jointly built up) and any other possession in life however dear & precious. You would not hesitate for a moment. Neither do we. Our answer is that we shall continue to be jointly responsible with you in the future as we have been in the past, and that the more we are menaced the harder we will fight until victory is won.

So far as the Union is concerned, the difficulty you allude to can be met. We can refuse if we choose to allow any members of the Union to share personally incurred liability.

With regard to Militancy—we have never for a single instance allowed our individual interests to stand in the way of any necessary action or policy to be pursued by the Union, and we never shall. At the present moment, hard fighting & harder than ever is essential. The harder the battle, the more need for every one of the generals & soldiers.

Yours very sincerely
Emmeline Pethick Lawrence

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{1} PETH 9/31.

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