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Howard, Sir Henry (1843-1921) Knight, diplomat
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Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Her uncle received Bob's letter with 'all the legal papers, settlement etc.' last night. Asks if Bob read through the settlement; she tried to last night but did not understand everything, nor did her uncle, so he has sent it to his lawyer to have it explained and they will return it as soon as possible. Her uncle was surprised not to find the marriage contract enclosed; thinks he expects Bob to write saying he approves and sending the contract back. Does not now feel 'bitter' about the earlier tensions as she loves and understands her uncle too much. [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife called yesterday and left cards, so the 'bridge' is formed. Is busy with packing and clearing; tonight she will look through an interesting old collection of papers relating to her mother's life and marriage with her uncle; she will certainly want to keep her mother's own letters. Tomorrow she is lunching with her 'only Dutch co-senior of St. Andrews, a girl from Rotterdam whose mother was an old friend of Bramine [Hubrecht]'s. Likes the clavichord present all the more as she thinks of it; thinks it very nice of Bob's friends; asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry [who decorated it] is pleased, and what 'poor Dolmetsch' will do without it. Teases Bob for having 'wedding presents from nice young lady friends [Lily Hodgkin] sent over from Dresden' and keeping it secret from her; she found out from Alice Jones. Tells him not to forget the parcel Booa will give him, nor the gold spectacles; he should also bring his play and any other poems he likes.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Things are looking 'a little brighter': if Bob is at Grosvenor Crescent he will have heard from his father about her letter to him and his response; asks whether his father or he thinks it was wrong of her to write. Sir George said she ought to tell her uncle at once about his wife's letter; was glad he seemed not to have entirely made up his mind not to come. Has had a long talk with her uncle, which resulted in him writing a draft letter to Bob's father that she thinks 'will entirely clear up the matter'; he was 'very distressed' when he realised the possible consequences. Her uncle writes that if Bob's father writes a few lines saying he would like to see [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife at the wedding, this will serve as an introduction and he will go and call on them; he also writes that in his son Ambro's view, the presence of the Howards means that the wedding should be celebrated in the English church, and Bessie was 'so astounded' she forgot to tell him the Howards are Roman Catholic so she does not think they 'care a hang'; she told him this morning. Her uncle has sent Ambro the draft letter to see what he thinks. She has felt very lonely and distressed, but now everything is all right and she is looking forward very much to Bob's arrival; feels 'incompleteness' without him, as if her '"moitié", as Grandmont always says' had been taken away. Hopes he has had a good time with [Desmond] MacCarthy and [Oswald] Sickert. Thinks the idea of going to stay near Roundhurst for a few days at the beginning of the honeymoon is 'delightful'. He seems to have had nice [wedding] presents; she is keeping a list of them. Mentions again that Alice Jones wanted to give her a book; her aunt at Hilversum has sent an antique silver clothes-brush. Tried on her wedding-dress the other day and felt 'enormously grand with a train'. Is doing her accounts for the year.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Received the letter Bob wrote on Friday this morning, which did her 'a great deal of good': she needs to be told that it is not worth getting depressed over little things on the 'frontier of [their] promised land'; will try to stay calm and wait to hear from his parents in response to her letter to his father. Last night she talked the matter [whether to invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] over with her uncle again; he still has objections but did not come to any firm conclusion, and they agreed it would be best to wait until Bob's arrival. Sir George's letter, though, may 'upset all', as she would have to explain to her uncle and aunt about his decision [not to come to the wedding] if he does not change his mind. Does not think Bob realises that it would then look as if his father was 'mortally offended & angry', and her uncle would be sure to take it that way, which might lead to a 'brouille [quarrel]' between them. She has seen the misery of quarrels often in her life and would be very sorry if anything of the kind took place. Tells Bob he ought not to miss the [Cambridge] Apostles' dinner on 13 June; they could perhaps go to Blackdown for a while so he could go to Cambridge for it; will be 'a great thing' for him to be there 'so soon after [he has] obtained the dignity of a married man'. Is glad about [Charles] Sanger but wants to hear more.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Returned from Amsterdam to find Bob and his mother's letters; is very sorry that he has spoken to his parents about her 'unfortunate letter', which caused his father to decide not to come over for the wedding, when she had emphasised that she was writing about her conversations with her uncle privately as she 'knew & hoped' he would reconsider; was writing in despondent mood after hearing her uncle's first objection to [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife being asked, but he always makes difficulties and then thinks differently, and had never decided in any case that he would not invite them. He was disturbed that day as he had misunderstood what she was saying about the Grandmonts, and thought she planned to write and tell them 'point blank' that the Howards were to be invited, without persuading them to come all the same. Bob seems to think it would be simpler for his father not to come, but she tells him it would be 'simply terrible': she would be very unhappy, and her uncle and aunt would be very disappointed, and probably very angry with her for writing so openly to Bob about what they say. She has written this afternoon in her 'despair' to Bob's father explaining the matter frankly, trying to make him see her point of view and begging him to reconsider his decision. Know this was 'very bold' and hopes Sir George will forgive her; asks Bob to try and persuade him to come as well. Bob's mother's letter was very kind, but she is 'horribly frightened' to think what she has done; should never have written to Bob as she did but did think he would keep it private. Very sweet of Bob to think of coming over sooner, but it is not necessary.

Letter concludes on a separate sheet [9/67]. Told Bob's father she would not tell her uncle about his decision until she heard again from him, so is 'walking about with the awful weight' upon her and nobody to share it

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Hague. - Talked to her uncle this evening, but he did not respond as well as she thought he would to the suggestion that [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife should be invited to the wedding; these days he cannot grasp a new idea 'without making a difficulty, an obstacle out of it'; this time he said the character of the occasion would be changed and it would become a 'state party', and she assured him she did not mind. Since he has never met the Howards he felt he could not invite them; she told him to think about the idea until Bob came over, when he may get to know them and ask them. Thinks it will all come right; his habit of making difficulties is 'infectious' and she asks Bob to help her resist this tendency in herself.

Returns to the letter on Tuesday morning [1 May]: wishes Bob were there to ''help & comfort her' since her uncle has been 'raging' at her for suggesting writing to the Grandmonts to tell them about perhaps inviting Sir Henry. Her aunt has just talked to her about it: they are 'very much against ' being obliged to ask someone they do not know and do not really care to ask; tells Bob this privately and thinks it best to wait now until he comes over and can talk to her uncle himself. It might be even better, if Bob's father strongly wishes the Howards to be invited, that he write and say so himself to her uncle, and give him an introduction to them. She only wanted to be totally frank, and thought telling her uncle how strongly Bob's father felt would persuade him; instead she has made him 'feel offended' at the idea of Bob's father 'wishing to govern' his invitations and 'threatening' that he would not come over if the Howards were not invited. Feels very helpless; hates to 'make a "stand" against people'; her uncle is very hard to deal with and her aunt just supports him. Poor Alice Jones must know something is going on, but she cannot discuss this with her.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Has just received Bob's letter with the long explanation about his father's request; she understands, and had already said she would withdraw any objection [to inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] if his parents wished it. She had made an objection 'long before the Grandmonts thought of it', but did not realize the Howards were 'so much & friendly related' to Bob's father. Has resolved not to be as worried about these things; it is not possible to insist on 'an ideal day'. Will talk to her uncle and ask him to send the invitation; hopes the Grandmonts will not decide to stay away, and agrees they should be told at once; Bramine knows how much it would hurt her if they did not come. Hopes they have forwarded the letter with her photograph to him. Originally enclosing the pattern she prefers for Bob's trousers. Tomorrow, she and Alice [Jones] are going sight-seeing in Amsterdam; they have talked a great deal about their school days; went to the English church with her this morning and did not enjoy yourself. Would be nice if Bob wrote a letter to thank the servants; thinks it would be best to send it to Booa [Mary Prestwich], but he should ask his mother who 'knows her people better'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o Mrs Salomonson, 49 Wierdensche Straat, Almelo; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Has been a week since Bob last wrote; hopes he is all right, and that he is in the country enjoying the sun. Went for a long drive yesterday to a place with an old castle and 'lovely wood' where they sat outside and had lunch; Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] seems well and happy and is very kind; gave Bessie a 'wonderful piece' of imitation Venice lace which she had worked herself, as well as an antique copper basket for flowers or fruit; Jeanne's husband went away yesterday, and Bessie is not sorry that she will see little of him again since she does not like him much, though he and Jeanne are happy and seem well suited. Jeanne has confided some little worries about her marriage which Bessie will tell Bob about later; does not think Jeanne ought to reproach herself as her husband does not seem to completely understand her. Received a telegram from Alice Jones this morning asking if she could come two weeks later; this will not be possible as they are repainting the rooms then and Bessie will be too busy; hopes Alice will still come. Writes later after receiving Bob's two letters. Discusses the material for Bob's wedding clothes again. Is glad he has written the letters to Sir Henry [Howard] and the consul [Henry Turing]. Would love to go to see Dan Leno with Bob some time. No reason why Bob should not go on sending letters to Irene Locco and writing letters to her, as long as Bessie and Bob love each other 'in the right way'. Tomorrow it is 'Venus day', as well as birthday and death day of Shakespeare. Is reading Turgenieff's "Väter und Söhne" [Fathers and Sons], which she thinks Bob has talked about, having read it in English translation as "Generations"; thinks it wonderful.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - He and his wife wish to leave the question of whether there should be a religious ceremony for Robert and Elizabeth's marriage to Hubrecht and his wife. They 'quite sympathise' with the desire for the marriage party to be 'quiet and familar', as their own wedding was the same; will not ask Hubrecht to invite any of their relations from England but will come alone with Robert's two brothers and ask if an apartment could be reserved at the hotel for them; will arrange about rooms for the servants themselves. They have no relations in the Netherlands but Sir Henry Howard; the connection between his family and theirs has been 'so old and honourable', and he has shown such marked recent kindness, that Sir George wishes him and his wife to invited to the luncheon. Has written a separate note [13/48] about the papers he is sending for Hubrecht's inspection; will have them immediately engrossed for Robert to sign once they come back from the Netherlands.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E. C. and forwarded to him at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Her uncle has gone to his meeting, so she has not been able yet to ask him about Bob's letter to [Henry] Turing; should be able to do so before dinner and send off this letter then; would like it to reach Bob tomorrow in London if possible. Now feels they ought to invite Turing to the wedding breakfast; they need not ask him to be a witness, since Louise [Hubrecht?]'s brother or [Abraham?] Bredius could do that, but Ambro [Hubrecht] and Marie, whom she visited at Utrecht last Sunday, both thought he should be invited to the meal; recommends that Bob not mention it in his letter, and when they ask him at a later date 'if he is a tactful & discreet person he will refuse'. Agrees with her uncle that Bob should write to the consul, and not just to Sir H. H. [Henry Howard, the British ambassador] since there are many legal arrangements to make with which Sir Henry would not be able to help; does not want to come under obligation to invite Sir Henry and his wife to the wedding, especially as he is a 'kind of relation'; will however explain Bob's objections to her uncle. Has had quite a lot of worry about these questions - had to go to bed 'in a flood of tears' one night when she was finishing "Cyrano de Bergerac' - but is feeling calmer about them now.

Takes up the letter again having talked to her uncle; as expected he thinks that Bob should send a letter to Turing through Sir Henry Howard and adds that it shows respect to Turing to communicate with him directly. Hopes Bob will write from Cornwall. Thanks him for enclosing the poem, which she likes very much; also found the Heine song and saw that Bob 'really can write German now' though he still makes some mistakes. Draws a sketch of what she would like to look like on her wedding day to show what a Watteau pleat looks like [see 9/45]; she will not look exactly like a Watteau lady, as they often wore very short petticoats and were much décolleté. Tells Bob the groom usually gives the bride an orange flower bouquet. Encloses a piece of the silk from which the dress is to be made. Is going to dine with her aunt now; signs off with Dutch endearments.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Explains why she feels her days of 'pure musical enjoyment' are probably over and her feelings about this; knows he would like her to find musical interests in England, and she will try, but it is unlikely to be the same and she will have to go 'miles out of her way' to find it; would certainly like him to be there with her if she does find anything like the same milieu. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother sending the programme for the concert; knows the Schubert quartet well; asks if Bob also heart the Beethoven serenade string trio. Very glad he feels he is understanding German more easily now; was disappointed when he declared on one of his first nights at Ede that nothing would every make him learn it, though he soon pleased her by offering to help Bramine to wash up the tea things. Her cold is gone: Emser pastilles are 'an excellent thing'. Has been having 'endless' conversations with her uncle about the wedding; this morning she was managing to keep her patience with his 'little objections and obstacles' but her aunt nearly lost hers. The conclusion is that Bob should write to the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Turing, asking if he will be able to be present at the civil ceremony in the Stadhuis; he should send the letter through Sir Henry Howard, who has kindly written to Bob, and explain their plans to him; Thursday of Whit week is the best day. They should not ask the consul to be a witness, as her uncle wished, since then he would have to be invited to the breakfast and would be the only stranger there. Has been thinking about her wedding dress: looking at white silks, sketching out designs including a Watteau pleat as she loves these, and talking to her dressmaker. Funny that Bob has also been thinking about his clothes; would recommend high trousers and a frock coat, in a blueish rather than yellowish grey. Dutch men wear evening dress when they are married, but since Bob is an Englishman she thinks he should wear his frock coat. Asks whether it is in good condition; her aunt was saying yesterday that she was looking forward to seeing him 'well-dressed & in neat clothes... [for] the first time!'; tells him to bring some nice suits over too for other occasions. Haverschmidt, who wrote under the name of Piet Paaltjens, is the Dutch poet Bob asked about. Could not find the Heine song Bob tells her about; a Heine song she has copied out originally enclosed in turn. Went to an 'wonderful' concert last night by George Henschel and his wife [Lilian Bailey]; he sang the Schubert "Gruppe aus dem Tartarus", which [Thomas Sturge? or George?] Moore sang in Cambridge. Is very pleased with the silk she has chosen, which she describes. Tells Bob to enjoy himself at Holman Hunt's

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Hubrecht for his explanation of Dutch inheritance law, which is 'very just in principle'; has often wished there were a similar one in England. Has heard from Robert in Milan, who seems very happy. They look forward to a visit from Elizabeth whenever is convenient for her. Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] is his cousin; sure he will be much interested; will be necessary to 'make all safe on the side of English law'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Sorry that Bob has a cold; he should 'choose a better way of showing [his] sympathy' with her. Discussion of comforting and sharing things with each other. Bob will have received her uncle's letter; thinks he is right to advise waiting to write to Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] until they hear from 'the Paris oracle' [Mr Barclay; see 9/40]. Hopes Bob has a good Easter with his friends; he must decide whether to go to Salisbury Plain rather than Borrowdale [for their honeymoon] as she does not know either place, and just wants the place to be 'retired from tourists... real country'. Describes Bob's enthusiasm for Flaubert and a performance by him from "La vision de St. Antoine" while they were sitting by the edge of a wood. Charming of [Bob's brothers] Charles and George to think of giving them a box to hold music. Spent a long time yesterday working on her will; it will be almost the same as her sister's. Will go to Amsterdam on Saturday if her cold is better to hear a Brahms chamber concert and have another lesson [with Bram Eldering]. Has read a great deal of "Wuthering Heights"; it is 'tremendously fierce & powerful'. Asks whether Bob has copies of certain books, if so she will leave them behind or give them to someone. The Boers have suffered a great loss with the death of Joubert; asks what the feeling is about it in England. Has had to order more photographs of Bob as she has given so many away. Scolds him for not spelling the name of the place where he lives correctly.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Hubrecht's wife has been outside and hopes to find her 'really better' when he comes over in May. Bessie has told him Hubrecht does not object to Whitweek for the wedding; this will be best for Robert's parents and brothers who all intend to come; doubts if anyone else from England will come; Hubrecht and Bessie should decide on the exact date. This will depend on when the Rotterdam consul [Henry Turing] can come; asks whether it would be best for him or Hubrecht to write about that, or should he ask Sir Henry Howard to do so? Bessie says they will probably need another witness; remembers Hubrecht said that if the consul were Dutch he might do, or he would have no objection to [Abraham] Bredius or any other friend of Hubrecht. If it is necessary to have an affidavit indicating his parents' consent this will be arranged. Has seen his birth certificate; the settlement is being drawn up at the lawyers. Very glad his parents are coming. Will write soon to Sir Henry Howard to let him know the date. Will come over as soon as Bessie wants him to. Bessie made all his family 'very fond of her' when she visited, and his friends who met her also liked her very much.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sorry to hear from Bessie this morning that her aunt was unwell; hopes she has now recovered. Bessie seems well, and they have had a good time at Welcombe; they go tomorrow to Dorking and on Monday to Dorking. She and his parents and brothers are now 'great friends'. Encloses a letter [13/36] from Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] saying that [Henry] Turing [British consul at Rotterdam] will come to the Hague for the wedding. Has spoken to his father, who will consult an English lawyer, on the points discussed with Hubrecht. Will see an oculist when he is in London on Monday; the spectacles can be sent if they are not ready when Bessie leaves; will also pay Luzac's bill. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's wife and Louisa; his parents send their regards.

Letter from Sir Henry Howard to R. C. Trevelyan

British Legation, The Hague. - Has seen Henry Turing, the British consul at Rotterdam, who confirms that the information Sir Henry gave Robert regarding his forthcoming marriage is correct: since his fiancé is a Dutch citizen, the marriage must be solemnized at the town hall in the Hague, and Turing must be present as consul so that the marriage can be properly registered in England. Turing has promised to come to the Hague; Robert is to pay for his expenses and consular fees. Mr [Paul] Hubrecht will be able to advise on the Dutch formalities. Sends regards to Elizabeth van der Hoeven and Robert's family.

Newspaper cutting: "Marriage of Mr. Robert Calverley Trevelyan"

Gives details of the wedding, such as the bride's costume, the guests (including Sir Henry Howard and his wife and Lord Reay), and the wedding gifts. The workmen on the Snitterfield estate had 'half a day's holiday and a present of half-a-sovereign each' in honour of the occasion, and the 'church bells rang out a merry peal'. Quotes Robert Trevelyan's letter thanking the men for their present.

Letter from Nora Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's parents have just visited to tell her the 'good news' [of his engagement]. Taormina [where he met Elizabeth] will be 'more than ever a charmed spot' for him. His parents both seem 'much pleased' with his choice; they are all eager to meet her. The family already has 'cousins at the Hague' in the British Minister, Sir Henry Howard. Congratulates Miss Van de Hoeven 'heartily, knowing what a prize she has got in winning [Bob's] warm heart' and how happy she will be.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very glad to get a 'cheerful letter' from Elizabeth and find 'everything is pleasantly settled' [about the Howards being invited and Sir George attending]; was stupid of her not to say that Bessie should show her letter to her uncle. Hopes the preparations will now go well and Elizabeth will enjoy Robert's visit before the wedding. They are looking forward to their visit to the Hague; not sure when the boys will arrive, since Charles thinks of going to Oberammergau for the Whit Sunday performance and George will not travel with them. Mrs Prestwich will look after Caroline, so she will not bring a maid; asks that she has 'a nice little room' near hers; they also think of bringing a footman who will need a bedroom. If the legal papers are ready in time, would be better if Robert signed them before leaving England. She and Sir George are going to Welcombe for a few days. Postscript saying that Elizabeth will find six pocket handkerchiefs 'of Armenian work' for her trousseau in the parcel.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter. The letter which Lady Trevelyan wrote was for Bessie to show to her uncle; asks her to do this. Thinks Robert was right to tell them about the difficulty. If her uncle really does not want [to invite Sir Henry Howard and his wife to the wedding]; Sir George does not want to insist. Asks her to let him know what has been decided so that he can make his plans.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Robert is with them; is sorry that there is a difficulty and Bessie's uncle does not want to invite the Howards to the wedding. Sir George feels that since the Howards are his relations and 'intimate with his family', and Sir Henry 'has been civil and helpful to Robert', he could not attend the wedding under the circumstances. She and Charles will come; hopes everything will go very happily.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very sorry that Bessie is troubled [about whether Sir Henry Howard is to be invited to the wedding and whether Sir George will come]; thinks that the best solution is what she has written [see 9/162]. Bessie must not worry. The Trevelyans remember meeting [Joseph] Joachim; Sir George will tell her all about it one day. Robert wanted to go to see Bessie, but she advised him not to unless she sent for him.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear that Bessie's aunt is convalescent; hopes she will soon be able to come downstairs, and that Bessie is not tired out nursing her. Will do Bessie good to have a change; they will expect her with pleasure on 14 or 15 Feb; she should arrange about her journey with Robert, and a servant can meet her in London if she is alone. Thinks Sir George will not be in a hurry to return to town, so she will be able to have a week with them at Welcombe, when there should be some signs of spring; she and Robert can be quiet there then in London Bessie can be introduced to a few friends and relatives. Encloses a letter from Robert. Sure the 'unhappy [Second Boer] war' must be 'very painful' to Bessie, as it is to them; she will not find them 'at all "jingo"'; she herself finds it 'most unnecessary & therefore wicked' on the part of Britain'. Would like Robert to have photographs taken of the same size as Bessie's, so she can have them together; would also like him to call on the Howards [Sir Henry Howard and his wife].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Bessie is all right. Teases her about his 'wedding presents from young ladies'. Is going to Roundhurst with the Frys now, unless they do not think the weather fine enough. Sorry he did not send the marriage contract; thought his father had done so; will get it amended before he comes over, which he expects will be Wednesday night. Will bring over his silk white tie for her to see, Will go up to London on Monday, staying at Hare Court. Glad the H's [Howards] called, which should make "matters quite simple now". Quotes the first lines of "Midsummer Night's Dream", changing 'Hippolyta' to 'Elizabeth'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Has come [to London] to be nearer to her. Hopes she got his wire to send letters to G[rosvenor] C[rescent]. Thinks his father is right that Bessie should show the letter at once, so that her uncle may realise the situation and the matter be settled a quickly as possible. Thinks she was right to state the whole thing to him as she did, and if her uncle is angry with her for this he is wrong. Is sorry she thinks he was wrong to tell his father, but does not see he had a choice; his father 'must be dealt with absolutely openly' and her uncle's objection to inviting the Howards 'concerned him nearly. Understands and sympathises with her reasons for writing to his father, but thinks it was a mistake. If her uncle were to invite the Howards after all, and do it 'in the right spirit', his father may come, though he cannot be sure of this. She must not allow herself to be upset.

Letter from Alice Dugdale to R. C. Trevelyan

28, Queen Anne's Gate, S. W. - Has just received Robert's letter [with the news of his engagement] and 'warmly welcome[s her] new niece'. Has 'always had a great liking' for the Netherlands, having stayed at the Hague with the Howards [Sir Henry Howard was British ambassador there], and thinks there is 'such a likeness' between the nations. Has been 'sorry for any possible strained relations' due to the [Second Boer] War, and hopes Robert and Elizabeth's engagement is a 'happy omen'. Asks Bob to tell Elizabeth that the Croppers at Ellergreen already make a link with her; has heard Miss [Eleanor?] Cropper on the subject. Wonders if Bob likes the Hague, and Delft, where her 'favourite hero of all, William the Silent, was done to death'. [Her son] Edgar is here and also sends 'warm wishes; [her other son] Frank is in the country.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

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