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Ward, Mary Augusta (1851-1920) novelist and social worker, called Mrs Humphry Ward
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Will not repeat what she has written to Robert about George's engagement; thinks that Elizabeth will find her [Janet Penrose Ward] 'a very nice sister-in-law' and that she will be 'a bright addition to the family'. Would like to discuss this and much more with Elizabeth, but is not sure how this can be arranged; if Mr [Bertrand?] Russell is visiting Elizabeth on Tuesday then she will not be able to visit; she should not travel during Epsom week; then Caroline and Sir George go to Welcombe until 8 June. Will come and visit when they return. Very interesting about the house, but there would have to be 'a very definite understanding; for building always costs more than is expected'. A postscript notes that Mrs W[ard] and Janet are returning, and Caroline will see them on Monday or Tuesday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Elizabeth's 'dear letter' arrived this morning, and Sir George is very pleased with Robert's; is sure Elizabeth will like Janet, who is 'a very genuine person'. Sent the telegram as she thought Elizabeth might be able to come tomorrow and wants to talk to her very much about the house and the engagement. Very busy today, with Aunt Annie [Philips] in the morning, then a meeting, then Mrs Ward and Janet. Going to Welcombe on Wednesday afternoon; are planning to tell 'relatives and near friends [sic]' about George's engagement, but keep it 'as quiet as possible' until nearer the time of his return on 16 June. Is pleased to have 'another daughter' but Elizabeth 'will always be the one that came to [her] first'. Postscript to say Janet wants to get to know Elizabeth and Robert, which Caroline will arrange on her return, and giving her address. An enclosure was brought by C[harles] from Turkey.

Letter from Janet Ward to Elizabeth Trevelyan

25, Grosvenor Place, S.W. - Sweet of Bessie to invite her down to keep her company; wishes she could do so at once but she and George have promised to pay two visits before next Wednesday, then that is Dorothy [her sister]'s birthday which they usually make 'rather a festivity of'. However, since they are visiting Hindhead that day she thinks she will be able to come to Dorking on the way. Will consult her mother, who has been very busy, about it; will only be able to stay two nights; would love to come as she wants to know her 'sister Bessie much better'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Arrived yesterday and is glad of the quiet; family affairs [George's engagement] are 'somewhat agitating' and London was hot and noisy; in Grosvenor Crescent 'the omnibuses & carts made day & night hideous'. Tried to see as much of Janet as she could, and thinks they will all like her very much; she seems 'very genuine... unaffected & straightforward'. Hopes Elizabeth will come up and see her as soon as they return from Welcombe. The Wards go to [their country house] Stocks for Whit week; the engagement is still being kept fairly quiet until George's return. Booa [Mary Prestwich] has found Elizabeth's candlesticks; unfortunately one is bent and Caroline will have it mended. The picture 'has mysteriously disappeared' but is sure it will soon be found if Elizabeth did not take it. Janet is very anxious to know Elizabeth and Robert. Hopes Elizabeth is feeling well; very wise to take care of herself. A long postscript on a separate sheet discusses Elizabeth and Robert's plan to move; very hard to find anywhere in Surrey 'away from villas'; good to be near a station. Asks whether they visited the Fernhurst house, and whether they would like anything else from the safe at Welcombe. Would be 'very nice to have a new house'.

Letter from Janet Ward to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks, Tring. - Asks if Bessie and Bob will be free to visit Stocks on Monday 8 November; her mother would love them to come 'before the trees have lost all their beauty'. A postscript on the back of the letter adds that she thinks they [she and George] will have 'possession of the house [their new house in Cheyne Gardens by Friday the 6th'; asks if they could come up to London then go down to Stocks on Saturday morning: the 'birthday party will want [them] so badly!'

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens. - Glad their letters have not crossed again; very good to think that 'two such dear people' [as Bessie and Bob] are thinking about her, so far away; promises Bessie will have her 'letter and telegram' [when the baby is born], and she will write herself as soon as she can. The nurse has 'left her box here', and Janet's mother has given her an 'adorable' bassinette, and 'a basket on legs to match'; hasn't dared to unwrap it and 'put up its little curtains yet, for fear of the wandering smut', but goes to look at it every so often. It is the back room that has been turned into the nursery; thinks it looks rather sweet, 'especially its frieze of the Noah's Ark procession running all round the top'. Believes the family will not return to Grosvenor Crescent until the middle of February, but thinks Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] will come to town before that to see her 'if necessary'. Hopes Booa will not be very unhappy that they are not planning to christen their child; as Bessie says she 'has become reconciled to many things of late years'. Has not talked to her about it yet, and thinks George probably would do it better. Her own family 'see the force of the pro-Christening arguments' more than she and George do, mainly 'from the point of view of the child in later years;' in case it becomes a Christian, but they will not mind very much; thinks herself that she and George will share their mind so much with their children that it seems unlikely they will want to become Anglicans; even if they do, it is not 'so very awful' to be baptised. Asks in a postscript whether the 'linoleum man' in Bessie's 'very amusing' story was from Catesby's Cork Tiles.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - George will be away for a week, so they plan to hold the family party [to celebrate his engagement] on 22 June when the Wards are in town; hope Elizabeth and Robert will be able to be there and to come up before it. Asks if it would suit them if she came home with them on the 23rd and travelled on to Welcombe next day to re-join Sir George, or should she try and come the previous week. Glad they had a pleasant visit from Mr [Bertrand?] Russell.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Sweet of Bessie to write about the babies and their whooping cough; they have it 'quite slightly' and the doctor thinks it will last no longer than three months so she and George still hope to get to Wallington, probably towards the end of August. They are going to Robin Ghyll a week on Monday; expects the air there will do the children good. It is a 'foul disease'; 'maddening' that there is nothing to be done to help the children while they have a coughing fit, but at least they do not 'dread the next fit' as an adult would; she has a 'cressoline lamp [sic: cresolene]' which seems to be the one thing the doctors believe helps. Sorry Bessie is worried about Paul; thinks she remembers Mary losing weight in her first six months 'trotting around'; not surprising that with teething and hot weather Paul has too. Bessie's three weeks alone with him must be tiring; hopes she is 'managing not to lift him' [due to her pregnancy?] but knows that must be hard.

She and George are going to have a third child; has only been sure for about ten days; has not even told her parents or Caroline yet, but could not write to Bessie without mentioning it; at present it is 'called Janetina'. They are in the train going to see the Chelsea Pageant and dine with Sir Edward Grey; expects he is being 'extra nice to George because he doesn't want any more inconvenient letters in the "Times" about Russian Exiles!' [cf. perhaps George's letter "Personal Liberty In Russia", "Times" (London, England), Jun 23, 1908; pg. 13; Issue 38680]. Janet can 'still be quite dissipated', and has not yet had to have her evening dresses let out'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Bessie for her letter and the 'adorable photograph' of Julian. Was 'fighting with a chapter of her book' at Robin Ghyll, but now has time to write. Mary [her daughter] has 'appropriated the photograph of Julian', who is looking 'handsome... splendidly big & strong'. Wishes she were not missing him at Wallington, but will probably leave on the 23rd to go the Lakes with her mother or stay with an aunt in Wales [Ethel Arnold?]; she and the children must certainly go to Stocks by the 28th. Arrived at Wallington on Wednesday to find Caroline in bed with a chill and Mrs [Hilda] Runciman in bed after a miscarriage; Molly was also ill in bed at Cambo, so Janet seems to have spent all her time visiting the sick and 'administering spiritual comfort'. though Caroline is the only one to have been really ill; she looks 'very frail' but does seem to have 'an indomitable power' of recovery if she can take her time. George is away till Monday for a walk along the Scottish border; has been working hard at Robin Ghyll and will take this month as holiday to recover. Bessie is going to be a 'lonely little widow' all winter [while Bob is travelling in the East]; wishes she would come and visit them in London, perhaps on her way to the Netherlands. Asks who the Gordon Bottomleys are. Mary very happy to be with the 'Cambo cousins' again, and Humphry is 'happy everywhere', especially 'playing with the big boys in the hall'. She is also happy, except that she 'still can't remember the way to make new little Trevies'; Moll seems to be 'going on really well now', which is a great comfort. Bessie must be very busy 'getting Bob rigged out & inoculated', but may have time to write another letter.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Luck more than 'a miracle' that she has found a governess, who came via the Gabbitas & Thring agency and is an 'Inverness girl' who studied French at Oxford for four years. Janet, on her way from Welcombe to Stocks, stopped and interviewed her, and 'engaged her walking up & down the platform' at the London & North Western station. The children are 'both delighted with her', and Janet thinks she will even be accepted by 'Nannie'. Her French is 'not really [emphasised] good' but distinctly above the average for British young ladies'; Mary has also started Latin with her and seems to pick it up easily. Their governess is only with them till the end of August; will be 'a bigger affair altogether' if Bessie wants to find one. Points out the success Molly has had with Miss Clark, who 'only sets out to be a nursery governess'; thinks Molly found her by advertising. Suggest that Bessie should come to live in London, where it would be 'quite easy to get Julian educated'; though if this meant 'letting the Shiffolds' she supposes it would 'break [their] hearts'. Going to Robin Ghyll next Monday; her parents have taken a little house at Grasmere till August; thinks her father is 'rather up & downing', and her sister Dorothy 'feels much tied to them', but they are happy to be in the Lakes. George's business in Rome seems to be going well; he is writing articles about it in the "Chronicle". Asks if they will see each other at Wallington in September.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Wishes she and Bessie could have seen each other here, but expects the 'war economy régime' could not have coped with them both being their with their children. Agrees that George seems to have found work which 'suits him down to the ground': though he doesn't know 'the least bit how to tie up a wounded limb or give an anasthetic'; he seems 'to be the [emphasised] person that they all want to go with', and the Italians 'love him'. The brigade has already had a great reception at Turinl expects they will be at Udine or even nearer the front by now; there are sixty people, many 'old hands from Flanders', twenty-six cars, and a 'clearing hospital of fifty beds' so they should be 'tremendously useful'. She herself is returning to London next Monday for three weeks, while the Hon. Sec. [of the Committee for Relief in Belgium, Mary Childers?] has a holiday, and will be there over the winter; hopes they can meet there after Janet's house comes out of its 'curl papers' about 27 Sept. Asks Bessie to tell Bob his '"Foolishness of Solomon" has given her 'many delicious chortles'. Her children are well, but fears 'the tonsils operation still hangs over Mary - & possibly Humphry too'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad Jan Hubrecht is visiting England; hopes he will see Cambridge and enjoy his time with Elizabeth and Robert; will be good for him after his illness. Is sending the Christmas present directly to the Mill House as [Mary] Prestwich does not have room in the hamper; there is also a pair of slippers which she has made. Hopes Elizabeth will use the purse [?] at once, in London and the Hague. Glad she is trying new ways to do her hair, and that her cough has gone. Expects Aunt Margaret [Holland] 'would be much amused by a "Dolmetsch"'; Caroline and Sir George are reading her book ["Life and letters of Zachary Macaulay"] with much interest; Zachary was 'rather boring ' but 'did a great work' and the life is well written and edited. Sir George is very glad Elizabeth likes "Persuasion"; he thinks 'the offer is the best in fiction'. Caroline is reading Mrs Humphry Ward's "Eleanor", whose novels always interest her though she feels 'critical about them'; Sir George 'cannot abide them'. Robert's sonnet is 'very pretty'; asks whether Elizabeth could get him to write one about the [Second Boer] war like William Watson, as he feels so strongly; thinks it would do good. Expects she has seen George's letter in the "Westminster" and Charlie's to the "Times"; Charlie has also making good speeches and getting his views known. Asks her to thank Robert for his letter about the portraits; there is no hurry as they will not be back till Easter, but thinks Sir George would sit if she urged him to. Glad Elizabeth's aunt is improving; her visit will cheer her.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Thanks Bessie for her sympathy; it [the death of her mother] was a 'most terribly sudden catastrophe' as she had seemed much better, but she made 'one imprudent movement next morning, and the poor heart gave way'. Arnold had just time to see her, but Janet was 'an hour too late'; was very hard taking the news to their father in the nursing home. It is 'the sort of grief that makes one feel years older'; feels as if they grew even closer during her mother's last years of ill health; George and her children loved her too. Hardest for her father and Dorothy, so she must help them; his father is recovering slowly; they hope to bring him back to Stocks for this summer and then the house will have to be sold. Hopes that Bessie is having a lovely time with Julian in Holland; asks if she will go to Germany at all; accounts of 'all the misery east of Holland absolutely haunt one'. Her mother's penultimate public appearance was at a Save the Children meeting in Berkhampsted; her speech 'made a deep impression'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Jokingly claims to be 'appalled' by Bob and Bessie's 'productiveness and industry'; Bob's translation of [Aeschylus's] "Oresteia" has just arrived, and now she hears that Bessie is also 'producing a great work'. She herself knows 'the arduousness of a long translation', having spent '6000 years of [her] youth... over Jülicher' [his commentary on the New Testament]. Gathers that Bessie's translation [of " Character and the Unconscious; a critical exposition of the psychology of Freud and of Jung" by J. H. van der Hoop] has 'quite amused her'; will definitely buy it when it is published. Hopes Bessie and Bob can come to spend a long weekend in February with them; from Saturday would be best as she usually has something keeping her late in London on Friday. She and George are planning a long trip to Italy; she has not been since before the war; they will take Mary and leave Humphry as a boarder at his school. Agrees it is good about Mary's Latin exam: she has never been 'particularly good at that formidable language', but 'they have dragged her somehow'. Her book ["The life of Mrs. Humphry Ward"] is going well; hopes to almost finish it by the time they go away and that it can come out in June; it is 'a great grind [emphasised], but rather lovely to do all the same'. Originally enclosing a photograph of Humphry, 'with a gun given him by Sydney Knutsford', and 'little Charles Fletcher' at Ellergreen; expects Bessie has heard about Edith Cropper's illness, a 'tragic change for that happy house'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Has 'never heard of such touching fraternal loyalty' as Bessie and Bob having her book ["The Life of Mrs. Humphry Ward"] and George's ["Manin and the Venetian Revolution of 1848 "], 'reading one to yourselves and one aloud'. Delighted they both like hers, as she values their judgement highly; she tried had to make it 'objective' and not 'mawkish', which is the risk with family biographies. Mary seems happy at Somerville, and to have 'found many people who are willing to be kind to her'; she writes about 'explorings & bicycle rides with other girls' and is 'only bored by Political Economy'; has to do that and Latin until next term for 'Pass Mods' but then can 'revel in history alone'. Her character is very similar to Janet's mother's at the same age; she is 'even already writing her first novel!'. The 'world is just about as horrible as it can be' but Jan Smuts is 'a grand fellow' [for his work with the League of Nations]; wonders whether he will 'yet save us all'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - True that 'one does feel forlorn' when both parents have died: her father was 'such an old darling', and they had much in common. However, has to be glad for him as he had suffered a great deal; he is now buried beside her mother in 'that lovely old churchyard'. Thanks Bessie for the trouble she has taken about Mary; has seen the letter and they all think 'the Leiden lady sounded delightful'; believes Mary wants to visit in September.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Does not like to think of Elizabeth being alone, but Robert says he will be away 'a short time' so hopes this is true. Thinks Elizabeth could certainly 'offer' herself to the Wards, but has not yet established whether they are settled at Stocks. Sir George likes the letter Robert has written to him on classics very much; he thinks him 'such a good critic' and wishes he would write 'prose on Classics - old & new'. Sir Walter Phillimore and his son [Walter or Stephen] are here; wishes Elizabeth were too; hopes Robert is enjoying the Lakes but does not like to think of him leaving her behind. Meg [Margaret Price] has been anxious about Robin, who has been very ill at Harrow with pneumonia but is now recovering; she will probably need to give up her trip to Norway. The hay is to be cut tomorrow; the 'school treat' is on Friday. Asks if Elizabeth has any amusing books; she herself is reading George Eliot's "Daniel Deronda" but finding it 'very long and dull'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing a letter; does not think she answered Elizabeth's last as Sir George said he would write to say what they thought about the rent [to the Vaughan Williamses for the new house to be built at Leith Hill?]. Hopes Robert returned 'refreshed and well [from the Lakes]' and that she is not too bothered by 'the house business'; business arrangements with friends are always difficult. Hopes something will be settled at Leith Hill as it is such a beautiful place. Has had a letter from Janet [Ward] describing 'their interview with "the Master [of Trinity, Montagu Butler?]". He was very deaf, & George shouted, but his talk seems to have been very good'. She then walked fifteen miles with no ill effects: "Surely George has found the right wife!" 'The lady mother' [Mrs Humphry Ward] is coming to Wallington next week, as she is opening a school in Newcastle. They were expecting the Monkswells today, but [Lady Monkswell] is unwell and cannot come. Various young people are coming next month; asks if Elizabeth and Robert can come on 20 August for a week, returning on 1 September, or whether another time would suit them.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad Elizabeth is seeing some friends, and that the '[house] business is moving on'; advertisement from "Country Life", showing prices usually asked in Surrey, originally enclosed. Went to Newcastle yesterday to hear Mrs Ward 'speak at the opening of some "Special Schools"', which she did 'very well. Saw various 'Hodgkins & Peases's', and brought Mrs Ward and Dorothy back to stay at Wallington. Next week they are expecting Aunt Annie [Philips], Phil [Morgan Philips] Price, Hilton Young, Eleanor Cropper and Cicely Wedgwood; next week Theodore [Llewelyn Davies?], Mary Bell and Dorothy Wedderburnl. Elizabeth and Robert will see them if they come on 20 August, though they do not have to decide yet. The weather is so windy she has to tie on her hat. Keith [the head gardener] is sending some more fruit today. Sorry that Mrs Fry had 'the trouble of writing twice'; it was 'such a pretty letter, in picturesque handwriting'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Is sorry 'about the wee doggie'; it is very sad but she hopes 'he may recover'. Is sending some game today; the grouse should be eaten first but the pheasants should keep until they return from Stocks [the Wards' country house]. Sir George has recovered, and he and his three friends are 'very happy together'; it is 'too funny sometimes to hear their reminiscences'; Sir George and Lord Belper 'took up an argument just where they left it 41 years ago!'. Mary is here; she and Charles are very happy; she 'certainly improves on acquaintance' and told Caroline that she was 'dreadfully uncomfortable' when staying in August, this is probably what 'made her so abrupt'. Mary is 'enchanted' with the house: they have a 'very tiny one in London' which is not as nice as Cheyne Gardens [George Trevelyan's new house]. Wants to hear what Elizabeth thinks of Cheyne Gardens; they will have fun on Friday and wishes she could be there. Is 'deeply grieved [sic] for Fry's anxiety [about his wife]'. Booa is 'very jealous about the apples & would like to have some'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sure Elizabeth is glad to be in bed in this cold weather, though since there was sunshine yesterday and today she and Sir George have taken some walks. The nurse has kindly written a long letter with much she wanted to know about Elizabeth and Paul. Is very glad to hear the nursing [breastfeeding] has begun so well; Mary and Pauline were both 'troublesome' though the boys [Theodore and George Lowthian] were not. Longs to see Elizabeth and Paul but must wait, as both she and Sir George are going to be careful not to catch chills. Has been busy with the accounts, and has 'embarked on another large Vol. of Sorel'. Asks if Elizabeth has had visitors yet; sure Miss Noel will be delighted. Janet is coming on 7 January, and her mother the next day; 'rather alarmed' at the thought of having Mrs Ward for 'two whole days'. Asks if Paul has been out yet; likes the idea of him 'being carried up and down the Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst?] Terrace which is so sheltered & sunny'. Long holiday at Stratford, with Christmas, bank holiday and local holiday; there has been tobogganing on the hill behind the house, and the pond will soon be frozen enough for skating.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Windermere. - Travelled here yesterday via Birmingham, where they saw 'the beautiful Burne Jones windows [at the Cathedral]'; they will drive on to Ullswater over the Kirkstone Pass. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is very happy and 'got up to Orrest Head' to enjoy the view. Most important is that Elizabeth and Robert do what is best for Julian, and follow the doctor's advice; she and Sir George will be sorry not to see him, but it is a long journey up to Wallington, which is 'far from a doctor'. Does think Elizabeth should get away as soon as she can; Julian can come north later, or go to the sea, as he may need a change later in the summer heat. Hopes Mrs Catt will return recovered and ready to take responsibility when Elizabeth is away. Thinks Elizabeth is doing well to get fourteen people at her meetings [of the Women's Liberal Association?]; asks if she is going to the Council meetings, which she herself is not sorry to miss as she dislikes 'these disputes so much', and whether she sees Mrs [Millicent] Fawcett and Mrs Ward. Mrs Ward 'deserves a good setting down [for her opposition to women's suffrage]; wonders if she minds it. Thinks 'the [Conciliation?] Bill agreed upon was a good one': though adult suffrage is the right thing it is impossible to pass it, so it is good if anything [on a lesser scale] can be arranged; nothing however can be done this year.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Hears that snow has fallen on some parts of the Riviera, and wonders whether Elizabeth and Robert have seen any. [George and Janet's] wedding is near, and the arrangements all seem to be made; she, Sir George, Charles, M[ary] and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going early and will be at the Registry Office; the others are coming by a special train and will go to the college [Somerville?]; some people think the arrangements 'very queer' and others 'are enthusiastic about the novel kind of marriage'. She herself thinks it will be nice, and wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George and Janet are going to a farm house in Surrey where the Wards used to spend their summers for ten days, and will then go abroad after having seen the furniture put into their house. Wonders when Elizabeth and Robert will return and whether the 'road [to their new house] business will be settled'; supposes they will want the building to begin as soon as possible. The clergy made 'most violent efforts against the progressives' in the London County Council election, but made little difference to the numbers. No one is sure whether there will be a general election soon; the government is 'absolutely discredited' and many of their own party are talking 'openly against them'. Emily Hobhouse has been to tea with her, having just returned from the Transvaal; Caroline is glad that she is to have a testimonial given her. They are going to Welcombe for about a fortnight on 29 March, then will return to London before they go abroad at Whitsun. Sir George is well, and 'reading busily for Vol IV [of "The American Revolution"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Glad that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have arrived. Caroline mentioned La Croiz to the Arthur Elliots, as they are going to the Riviera at Easter, but could not tell them whether there were 'good drives' which is important as he is 'very lame'. The last days before [George and Janet's] wedding are most exciting; the Wards are 'wonderfully energetic' and their arrangements go well. Went to see the presents yesterday; there seemed to be almost as many as C[harles] and M[ary] had, though there were fewer presentations and large things. Janet had 'some very nice offerings from her girls, & many servants & poor people'; lots of books, silver, cheques; Janet's trousseau was 'nice and useful'. Hopes the weather at Oxford will be good. Caroline, Sir George and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going down before the special train to be at the registry. She and Sir George have not been well; thinks Sir George was doing too much, so he is resting. The Duke of Cambridge has died, so there will be no question of going to Court tomorrow; is glad as it 'seemed so inappropriate'. Has a note from [Bramine Hubrecht at] Taormina saying that the things have been sent; hopes they will arrive soon. Hopes the concert went well. The H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s 'would be sorry not to be able to stop'. They [the Liberals] have won another [by] election, and 'the Gov[ernment] are in a poor way'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad Elizabeth is enjoying her visit and has seen the [Gilbert?] Murrays; is 'so fond of Mary'. Letters to G[eorge] and J[anet] should be sent to the Wards, staying at Villa Bonaventura, Cadenabbia, who will forward them on. The latest news of them is from Florence; they were 'very happy'. Has had 'such a nice note' from Miss [Mary?] Fletcher, and has asked Imogen to play, since they are coming [to Caroline's party]. Arrangements for meeting; including the concert they are going to together. Encloses an invitation to the party [?] in case Robert would like to ask [Henry] Previté; they should say if there is anyone else they would like to come. She and Sir George liked Mr Howells, and found Mrs Atherton amusing. Very glad Elizabeth found Mrs F [Helen Fry?] better, but it 'does not seem satisfactory'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Menaggio. - Glad that Elizabeth is better, and had 'a satisfactory interview with Mrs Scharlieb'; they were also interested in the Dorking meeting; parts of 'Mr G. M.'s letters' appeared in the newspapers; glad that Robert took a share in proceedings. It is lovely here, and they have spent a 'lazy day' sitting with Aunt Margaret in the garden and going with her and Lionel on the Lake [Como]; Margaret is much better. They are thinking of going to Baveno for a few days on Monday. Spent a day at St Moritz on the way, which she did not like much; it also rained heavily when going up there and down the Maloja [Pass], but they have otherwise had good weather. Mrs Humphry Ward has had to leave in answer to a telegraph about her brother [William Arnold], whom she thinks Elizabeth has met though she herself has never done so; fears there has been 'some fatal turn to his illness'. Sir George is well, and Booa thinks Italy is 'wonderful'; she agrees it is very beautiful, and 'even the great number of houses & villas on the banks cannot spoil it. Hopes that the building [of Robert and Elizabeth's new house] can now begin. Sends birthday wishes, though apologises for forgetting the exact date. Hopes the opera was good, and that 'the invalid at Cumberland Place' was better; Mary 'seemed so kind about her'.