Affichage de 54487 résultats

Description archivistique
Aperçu avant impression Affichage :

3144 résultats avec objets numériques Afficher les résultats avec des objets numériques

Scientific correspondence

This class includes two series of Batchelor’s correspondence files and also loose scientific correspondence that was not filed. The alphabetically-arranged files of correspondence (F1 and F2) begin with letters from the 1940s. Probably at the beginning of 1980, with the size of the files increasing, a second series was begun. The files in the first series thus practically finish in 1979, however occasionally letters of a later date were inserted, hence the covering dates of some files in this continue beyond 1979. A third series (F3) has been created for the correspondence that was not filed. A correspondent’s appearance in this third series does not indicate that they do not appear in series F1 and/or F2.

Trinity College

This class contains a few items relating to Batchelor’s relationship with Trinity College. He was admitted as a Research Student in 1945, elected a Fellow under Title A [Junior Research Fellow] in 1947 and under Title B [Senior Research Fellow] in 1951. Correspondence concerning his admission can be found at BACH/B7

Papers of A. W. Verrall

These items were given to CDB by W H Salter. They are perhaps papers that were rejected for publication in Collected Studies in Greek and Latin Scholarship edited by M A Bayfield and J D Duff as some of the annotations seem to be by Bayfield

Letters from Emily Isham and Walter Rye to W. Aldis Wright

Letter from Walter Rye accompanied by a printed broadsheet, "A pedigree of ye family of Vaughan of Leominster, compiled from materials in the possession of Lady Isham of Lamport & inscribed to her by W. Rye, 1876".

Wright, William Aldis (1831-1914), literary and biblical scholar

Letters to Joseph Edleston

Thirteen letters: four from C. W. King, three from Robert Potts, two from Edmund Beckett Denison [later Edmund Beckett, 1st Baron Grimthorpe], one each from [Francis] Martin, Charles Musgrave, R. F. Scott, and Edward Meredith Cope. Several letters refer to the death of William Whewell and his bequest to the College. In addition, there is one printed letter circulated for the Fellows only from Francis Martin dated 3 Dec. 1857.

Edleston, Joseph (c 1816-1895) Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge

Letters to Joseph Edleston

Three letters, from C. W. King, S. H. Walpole, and E. Beckett, Baron Grimthorpe.

Edleston, Joseph (c 1816-1895) Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge

Letter from Caroline Jebb to Nora Sidgwick

Apologises for having given her the trouble of sending back her [Jebb's] letter to Mr Appleton. States that the letter he received has probably been sent to her at Newnham. Claims that Henry Sidgwick's illness 'lies like a shadow over Cambridge'. Declares that he has lived 'so beautiful a life, so high above the temptations of the [ ]', and that he has given 'such unstinted help and sympathy in every cause and every charity'. Speaks of the dread of losing him, which 'made an ache in every heart.' Claims to be relieved by news from Nora. Reports that the Master's telegram is always put up in the combination room, and that they can all hear of progress by that means. Asks her to tell Henry that they all say that they 'never knew anyone so universally beloved.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F. W. H. Myers

Refers to [W.F.] Barrett's letter as 'a bore'. States that they must 'maintain the distinction between experimental work and collection of narratives, and between hypnotic and normal state'. Suggests that they appease Barrett by admitting 'the great advantage of having all the evidence set forth together from time to time by an able hand' and allow him to print his paper, provided it is not called a 'Report of the [ ] [ ] Committee.' States that he is writing to Gurney with this proposal. Adds that he intends to propose the Lord Rayleigh F.R.S. as Vice-President [of the Society for Psychical Research] at their next council meeting.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F. W. H. Myers

Reports that nothing fresh has happened, but declares that 'what has happened...seems to [him] to furnish adequate matter for a Dialogue between a Poet and a Philosopher.' Arranges to meet 'at the Restaurant' to talk.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F. W. H. Myers

Tells him that he may tell anyone he wishes to tell, as he supposes the information 'will come quite out in a day or two.' Tells him to count on him 'for the 4th', and presumes that he has made arrangements at Newcastle. States that Dakyns, with whom he is staying, 'would like to come to about half a dozen seances', and asks if he shall be let in. Declares that he is a sympathetic person, and would be good.

Copy of a letter from Henry Sidgwick to F. W. H. Myers

Asks for information concerning Myers' coming to Cambridge, 'The Prospects of Poetry' and 'The Probabilities of Medicine etc etc'. Declares that they have much to discuss, HS having failed to write due to the unrealised expectation of seeing Myers at Rugby. Reports that he has to teach history that term, 'no successor having turned up to Pearson: and Cambridge breeding no healthy young resident and locking him up with a Hume.' Asks if he has seen Noel 'in the Dark Blue'. Suggests that he may have been ashamed to send it to Myers, as 'some of the polemic is almost personal'. Declares that it is very well written, 'except the polemical part', and states that he writes better prose than verse. Reports that Noel nearly quarrelled with him 'for reluctantly avowing that [HS] did not consider him an equal of Swinburne.' States that Noel 'thinks that the Verbal School [S. Rossetti, etc - non sine te] have been found out'. Refers to 'Edinburgh' of July, and the Contemporary [Review] of October as having evidence to support this theory. States that Noel also thinks that 'Buchanan and R.N are going to be chaired instead by a mutable but at length appreciative public.' Refers to 'a certain Mutual Admiration league' between Noel and Symonds. Believes that the latter's poetry could be successful, 'if he could only impassion himself about a good subject.' Asks Myers to send his last epic. Tells him to read Noel's article. Sends his regards to Myers' mother. Announces that his second correspondence circular is soon to appear. Reports that Miss Clough is in Cambridge, that the house is 'getting on', and that there will be five [women] there that term.

Copy of a letter from Henry Sidgwick to F. W. H. Myers

Reports that he has received his letter, and declares that he would much like to come and see him at Cheltenham. Announces that he is going to Rugby for a week, and must be in Cambridge from 1 October, 'partly for ladies' lectures, partly to catch zealous pupils who are to be examined in November, and dialectically improve them before term begins.' States that he read his poem, 'Ammergau', in [Macmillan's Magazine], and declares that it did not please him quite as much as 'the Roman poem', but that he liked the close exceedingly. Reports that he returned from Germany earlier than he had intended because of the war. Declares that his sympathies have turned round lately. Asserts that 'there is something almost attractive about French conceit' and that the image of a victorious German is unappealing. Fears that they shall miss each other at Rugby, and mentions that he may go down there again for a day or two if he finds the time, but envisages that they shall meet 'in town'. Offers to introduce him to Hutton. Remarks that 'the Spectator is not particularly good to write for as the editors do so much themselves'. Note by F.W.H. Myers: 'I thought at that time of taking to writing reviews'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E. W. Benson

Undertakes to write on 'the other matter...as soon as the visit is over', and states that they both entirely agree with Benson's view of 'the present situation.' Is glad to hear that Hugh is quite recovered. Adds that the Conservatives 'have just decided, by 50 to 16, to select Jebb for vacant seat' [in Parliament for Cambridge University]. Incomplete.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E. W. Benson

Reports that [E. M?] Young has asked his advice about standing for Benson's 'place' [as head of Wellington College?], and that he has advised him to stand, but has told him that he did not think him the ideal man. Refers to him as a 'safe' man. Adds that Young has asked him for a testimonial, but before writing Henry would like to know if there is any candidate whom Benson would prefer to Young. Refers to the fact that when Henry and Benson were last together, the latter mentioned [E. A.?] Abbott. Asks him if he would mind him saying that he [Abbott] would have Benson's support. Asks him to tell Minnie that he is 'always writing to her.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E. W. Benson

Congratulates him on his chancellorship [of Lincoln Cathedral], admitting, however, that he has no idea what a chancellor is. Supposes that his new position will give him the leisure 'to construct the Church of the Future, and reconstruct that of the past.' Adds that he has just met 'a quasi-ecclesiastical layman', who confused him in relation to the characteristic functions of 'Chancellor' as distinct from 'Canon'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E. W. Benson

Writes in relation to the predicament of the Vicar of St Luke's in Chesterton [George Hale], who is in the process of trying to persuade the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to give a Population Grant to his district parish. Its members, comprising mainly of College servants and small tradesmen, have increased, resulting in the need for financial assistance. States that the case is briefly stated in the enclosed paper [not included], and more fully in a pamphlet that he himself has read. Believes that the Commisioners could relax the rule that prevents them from giving a grant, and that, in doing so, no dangerous precedent would be set; rather a 'substantial justice' would be done. Asks him to tell Minnie that he has news of Psychical Research to impart to her when they meet, and that Nora has been having her portrait painted by an artist named Shannon, 'who is believed to be "on the rise" '.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to E. W. Benson

[Sent from Courmayeur]:- Refers to his failure to send any correspondence sooner, and to his attitude to sending letters from abroad. Claims that at Dresden he did not find that the time 'made itself for letter-writing'. Speaks of his progress in reading, writing and speaking German. Refers to Benson's holiday [in France], and to the beauty of the 'aiguilles and glaciers' of the vale of Chamonix. Remarks that Minnie must have enjoyed it. Reports that he walked for eleven hours along the Allée Blanche of Mont Blanc on his way to Courmayeur.

In relation to his stay in Dresden, claims that he liked Herr Schier very much, but disagreed with his politics. Speaks well of Professor and Mrs Hughes, but claims that he did not get on very well with anybody else. States that Mrs and Mrs Henry Hughes somehow did not suit him, and that the other English there kept him back in his German as they always spoke in English. Reports that Dale, with whom he used to spend the Sundays, was very kind, and that he asked after Benson and Minnie. Refers to [ ] having eight children, 'and no money to speak of!' Hopes that Benson 'found the boys as good as ever and the heather well out', and asks him to give his love to Minnie. Sends a poem to the latter [not included].

Résultats 1 à 30 sur 54487