Print preview Close

Showing 72 results

Archivistische beschrijving
1 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects
Manuscripts in Printed Books
MSPB · Archief · 1791-1955

Most of the items included in this category are letters, and most are connected with the publications into which they are inserted.

Zonder titel
MSPB/8 · Deel · 1931 x 1959
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Transcript

[…]

In your Court Records p. 93 (13 April 1603) you may care to refer to Arber II. 38. There was a London edition of the Lepanto published by Stafford and Hooke, 1603. A copy was in Bindley IV. 410—Heber IV. 1189—Britwell (private cat. of Eng. poetry II. 220, but not, apparently sold at Sotheby’s, see Checklist). See Arber III. 232.

[…]

MSPB/73 · Stuk · 18 Feb. 1871
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Bridge House, Matlock, Derbyshire. - Sent a 'small Páli MS and a printed Buddhist tract to Trinity Library yesterday, and with this letter sends his copy of Rask's Sinhalese gramma, 'a work of exceeding rarity, and which I do not think any English library possesses. Gives him great pleasure 'to confide this valuable volume to such able and enlightened keeping as that of the Master and fellows of Trinity College.'

MSPB/66 · Stuk · 5 Dec. 1859
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Transcript

Dec. 5

Dearest A {1}

This is merely a P.S. to my last notelet to beg you to give my sweet & "blessed little Florey" an extra kiss from poor Anty Ett on her birthday,—; & to beg Richee's {2} acceptance, (ultimately for her) of my Copy of the Hungerfordiana, which he told me the other day he had been trying to procure & could not—

There were never more than 100 Copies printed—only 50 for sale—now six & thirty years ago—so no wonder.

He is to keep it, please, for his beautiful little Florey, as she alone bears the dear dear old name.

Neither Amy nor Robin have anything to say to it!—

I trust the sweet Rob does not feel these changes of temperature, & that you are all "flourishing"—

God bless you, my dearest—Yr most devoted
HMC.—

—————

{1} Followed by a heart containing the letters 'a', 'F', and 'R', for Amy, Florence, and Robin.

{2} The spelling of this name is uncertain.

MSPB/65 · Stuk · 11 Oct. 1855
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Queen's Hotel, No. 71, Queen's Road, Bayswater, London -- Sends the book and asks for assistance in obtaining a copy of an elementary treatise on the tides by 'Lubock' or 'Luccock', as he has seen it variously spelled [William Lubbock]; is about to return to America.

MSPB/62 · Stuk · 3 Jul. [1877?]
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

3 Bolton St. - Thanks Lord Houghton for his note about the book [The American]; agrees that 'the Bellegardes are rather "belated". They would have been more probable under the old régime; but I suppose a novelist has always to force matters a little. But even to modified Bellegardes an American savoring much of the soil would never have been acceptable. The French don't at all like the Americans (according to my observation) - none, that is, save M. [Charles Frederick] Worth; & he, I believe, is English!. But the French, after all, don't like any one but the French!...'

Hopes that Houghton has completely recovered. Will leave town in a few days, but will visit Houghton before he does so. 'Yours faithfully & gratefully, H. James jr.'

MSPB/61 · Stuk · 2 July 185[1]
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Forwards the verses and addresses in the pamphlet and mentions English stanzas identified in manuscript on the page as by William Johnson (later Cory), and also praises the second English address by [Herbert John] Reynolds KS (King's Scholar). Is happy to find that he will soon be able to make mathematics "an integral part of our system, King's College has smoothed my way".

Zonder titel
MSPB/55 · Stuk · 26 Nov. 1851
Part of Manuscripts in Printed Books

Trinity Lodge, Cambridge - Regrets he cannot give a lecture on the Great Exhibition and its effects on the future as he has not been one of its organisers, who will have a better idea of its effects; believes that Prince Albert only meant to describe the type of person to give the lecture, not to point to Whewell specifically.