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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls Place, Portland Place, W. - Thanks Trevelyan for the copy of the "Birth of Parsifal"; has not had time during term to re-read it, but Trevelyan read it to him in MS. Apologises for asking, in return, whether Trevelyan could help any further with funds for the "Independent Review" [an enclosure mentioned is now missing]. Roger [Fry] has just returned from the US, where he has been meeting Pierpoint Morgan and almost accepted a post [Fry did eventually take up this post, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]. Fry, Helen [his wife], and Dickinson think of going to Spain at Easter.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

1 All Souls Place, Portland Place, W. - Rather surprised by news of Trevelyan's engagement; general thoughts on marriage; is sure Trevelyan has chosen well and looks forward to meeting his fiancé. It is good that she is a musician. Roger [Fry] has returned, and he thinks of going to see him. Still not certain whether Ferdinand [Schiller] will return to India or not, 'so my life is hanging in the balance too'. Fears he cannot share Roger's interest in pictures; the only picture he cares for in the U.C.A.C. is Fry's 'Pool'. Asks if he Trevelyan has read Stephen Phillips' 'Paolo and Francesca'. Hopes he has a good time in Ravello.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

King's College, Cambridge. - Has asked his sisters to get him a ticket for "Tristan" as he wanted to take someone who will be staying with them; however, if there are none left he would like to use Trevelyan's. Is not sure whether he will be able to go to "Orfeo". Roger [Fry] has just started back. Mention of a 'wretched business' [the illness of Fry's wife?]

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

K[ing's] C[ollege] C[ambridge]. - Wishes the war could be resolved as easily as their latest postal chess game: still seems to 'hang on a razor's edge'. Has not seen Roger [Fry] lately; Trevelyan will have heard of his father's death. Hugh Meredith is visiting for the weekend. The 'league of nations row' appears to be adjusting itself satisfactorily. Wilson seems 'to be emerging as a really great man'. Trevelyan, having had the luck to be appointed librarian, must be enjoying the purchase of books. Not worth while beginning another [chess] game.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst. - Roger [Fry] is leaving for London towards the end of the month; asks if he himself can stay on for a while and ask a friend [name illegible] to join him, as he is fond of the place and of Augustus (though 'the poor child has got hooping-cough'). Roger 'keeps up', but collapses when he goes to town. No change in Helen's condition. Is getting on with his dialogues, and reading "Sidonia" [Meinhold's "Sidonia von Borke: die Klosterhexe" or "Sidonia the Sorceress"] and wonders why Trevelyan thinks so much of it. Visited the Tennysons recently; remarks on what a 'fat lethargic domestic chief' [Hallam Tennyson] is. 'Kittie' Bathurst is there: asks if Trevelyan knows her. Dickinson and Lord Tennyson played cricket against the boys and were well beaten. Asks to be remembered to Berenson. Has been seeing something of the 'Friday's Hill' people [the Pearsall Smiths].

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

K[ing's] C[ollege] C[ambridge]. - Ironically praises his own typing. Wasn't well when he saw Julian; wonders why he stays in England when the weather is so dreadful. Supposes Bessie will feel Munro's play is 'not a play', though he thinks it is good; certainly it is 'good propaganda'. Is going to Bob's opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] in April, but otherwise has no firm plans. Roger [Fry] has gone to France. Danille [?] came to Cambridge yesterday and is 'very friendly and nice.'

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking. - Greatly admires Dickinson's dialogue ["A Modern Symposium"], which he praises at length. Thinks his sympathies were most with Martin, Ellis, Woodman and Vivian, and of course Coryat, in whom he seems to recognise something of himself. Bessie has not yet read it, but is just about to. They hope Dickinson is still coming to visit on the 25th or the weekend after that, then they are going abroad. Roger and Helen [Fry] are coming this Sunday.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Sends his letter to Westcott, rather than care of Mrs Pepper, so that it is sure to reach Trevelyan. He and his mother have found a house, called Glendore, at Weybridge, which he describes in detail. Had a pleasant visit to [Roger] Fry in London. May go to Munich in the winter, but hopes to see Trevelyan before then.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Forster's plans are disturbed as his aunt has not been well enough to have him and his mother to stay. Would like to come and see Trevelyan. Has just been to stay with E. H. Young near Marlborough and then walked to the White Horse, Wantage, and Goring along the Icknield Way. Sidgwick and Jackson are interested in publishing his short stories; they suggest illustrations, which he does not want; he would though be happy with illustrated end-papers and asks if Fry likes his stories enough to design these. Sidgwick and Jackson's letters originally enclosed: 'Hellfellows' is 'an awful work of Housman's' ["All-fellows: Seven Legends of Lower Redemption," by Laurence Housman] which the publishers wanted Forster's work to resemble. 'Marguerite was well rid of Mat' [Matthew Arnold]. Does not think Stokoe's idea to take a BA degree and teach a good one.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Asks if her can come to stay from Wednesday to Friday, which means he will see [Donald] Tovey. Will visit his aunt on the way; asks if his visit can be kept quiet as surprise visits tire her less. Good news about Fry [that he is willing to design endpapers for "The Celestial Omnibus and other stories", see 3/22] but will do nothing until he hears from Sidgwick and Jackson again.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Distressed to hear things did not go well [regarding the birth of the Trevelyans' son, Julian?] and glad they seem to be better again. Is glad that Moore thinks his book good: says that he 'never understand[s] Moore but like[s] him very much', then corrects himself when he realises not G.E. Moore but [Thomas] Sturge Moore is meant. Was at Lady Ottoline's yesterday and saw Fry; his wife is at home and he seems in good spirits. Went to 'the Sicilians' [the production of Sinopoli's "La Zolfara" at the Lyric Theatre?]

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Weybridge. - Thanks Trevelyan for the cheque. Encourages him to read [Wilfred Scawen] Blunt after Goldie [Dickinson]. Has just received the proofs of his 'worthy' piece for the "Nation". Is glad Trevelyan 'has unlocked the key of blue' [?] and that Charlotte interests him. Dined with Roger [Fry] and Clive Bell last night, and '[b]iffed all their art bosh'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Tried to ring up, but the telephone was out of order. Sorry to hear Bessie's news, especially as he was hoping to see her more often. Asks where she is going: he and Goldie [Dickinson] used to like Lyme Regis; Sidmouth has a new public garden laid out by Dartington Hall; he likes Eastbourne the best of the nearer resorts. Asks if she sent a letter to Gerald Heard at the Buckinghams: B. [Bob] is intrigued. Is enjoying Roger's book [Roger Fry's translations of Mallarme?].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea SW. - He and Goldie [Dickinson] start tomorrow to bicycle to Failand: asks whether Trevelyan will be at Welcombe and able to put them up on Saturday night. If Trevelyan is not staying on at Welcombe, asks him to keep away from town for a day or two to give Mrs Smith a holiday, since they have 'played such a Box & Cox game that she hasn't had any as yet'

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o R. W. Reynolds, 2 Hare Court, Temple, E.C. - Returns Trevelyan's poems; he has been unable to write a 'proper criticism', though he makes a few comments about the "Orpheus", which he very much likes, and the "Elegiacs", where there are some lines which give the same feeling as Poynters and Alma Tadenas - 'sham classical pictures'. Will reread the "Epimetheus" then send it on. Fry and his wife are going to try and get the Berners Street flat; Trevelyan must say if it doesn't suit him. They think he will be able to have both a bed room and sitting room. The initials are getting on very well.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Hotel du Luxembourg, Avignon. - There is still time for Trevelyan to send his letters of introduction to Marseilles, as Fry and his wife have 'loafed about a great deal' on the journey south on their honeymoon. Impressions of Avignon. Has begun to draw 'in a lazy sort of way'. Encloses a cheque for wedding costs, and expresses gratitude; it was good of Trevelyan to see them off: unorthodox, but emblematic of the fact that they don't intend to isolate themselves in marriage. Has been reading Theocritus, mostly in translation; would be 'absolutely happy' if he knew Greek and Latin well, but he never will. Trevelyan should not scoff: he does not know what a drunken man's liver looks like and Fry does.

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