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Letters from F. Barker to J. Edleston

Four letters: "Refers to I. Newton letter to Sam. Pepys 23 Dec. 1693 bought by R. J. Edleston from F. Barker (who bought it from [?] 'Bibliotheca Phillippica' 4th July -6 July 1892) and later presented by Miss Edleston to Trinity College Library in 1953." - note on second page of Add.Ms.c.1/100.

Edleston, Joseph (c 1816-1895) Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge

W. G. Clark: notebook on classical subjects

Includes notes on Heinrich Ritter's History of Ancient Philosophy, George Grote's History of Greece, a draft of a paper given on "The Accentuation of Ancient Greek" dated Nov. 12, 1860, as well as a translation of Act I of Goethe's "Götz von Berlichingen".

Clark, William George (1821–1878), literary and classical scholar

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Informs her that they have posts there [in Keswick] occasionally, if she wishes to write. Writes a list of 'pros and cons' in relation to their accommodation. Concludes that on the whole 'it is the best situation in Borrowdale: and therefore in the English Lakes: and therefore, for short mountain walks, in the World'. Admits to not liking the scenery as much as he did three years previously, and thinks that neither does William, but concedes that the scenery is beautiful.

Reports that they have met Edmund Fisher and his wife, 'who is nice and prettyish'. Announces that he reviewed a poem called Ludibria Lunae in the Spectator. It is a satire on the efforts to emancipate women from their subjection, and he claims to have tried to be as stinging as he could, without showing that he had lost his temper. Announces that they expect [G. O.] Trevelyan soon, and that he is to be married on 24 September. Reports that William 'does not seem unwell particularly', but his sleeping has not improved as much as they had hoped. Sends his love to Edward and the children. Asks if she heard that F[rederic] Fisher was engaged to his Bishop's daughter [Agnes, daughter of the Bishop of London, John Jackson].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson.

Announces that he is going to Cambridge 'on the 3rd', and is thinking of going to visit her for a night or two 'after the 11th and before the 18th if convenient.' Remarks that the Rugby news was a shock, and states that he ceases to advise acquiescence [a reference to the troubles with the head, Henry Hayman?]. Reports that Arthur was skating on the Downs.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Reports that Mr [G. G.?] Bradley told him that he forwarded Henry's watch to him at Wellington College, and suggests that she [Minnie] has pawned it. Asks her to send it to him at Trinity College, where is going on the following Saturday, if it is 'hanging about [Wellington] College anywhere'. States that he arrived at Rugby by Calais. Claims to like the house at Rugby very much. States that the dining-room can only hold twelve people, but that the drawing room 'is very nice.' Reports that there are 'an extraordinary number of new masters' there, with the result that 'the time-honoured arrangements are undergoing much criticism.' Hopes that Ada [Benson] got safely to Weston that day 'without having another attack.' Does not think that their mother looked very well. Claims that Mr Ladkin 'behaved like a Beast.' Reports that they have just been consulting Mr [Charles?] Waterfield as to the advisability of going to [Law] with him. States that he bought a print of his favourite Correggio 'with the jolly little cherub astride the cloud.' Asks whether Edward has filled up the vacancies satisfactorily, and sends his love to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers to [W.F.] Barrett's letter as 'a bore'. States that they must 'maintain the distinction between experimental work and collection of narratives, and between hypnotic and normal state'. Suggests that they appease Barrett by admitting 'the great advantage of having all the evidence set forth together from time to time by an able hand' and allow him to print his paper, provided it is not called a 'Report of the [ ] [ ] Committee.' States that he is writing to Gurney with this proposal. Adds that he intends to propose the Lord Rayleigh F.R.S. as Vice-President [of the Society for Psychical Research] at their next council meeting.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that what Myers has told him 'is certainly a relief', and claims that he shall now find it easier to tell those who have to be told, 'without saying anything about his insanity.' Refers to a séance, at which he, Nora, [Henry] Slade and Lankester were present, and which is the subject of some controversy. Thinks that Myers had better go, 'when Miss B[ibby]'s sittings are over, if nothing else turns up.' States that if Myers comes across anything good, he [Henry] will instantly come to town and go with him. Undertakes to send back Miss B[ibby]'s note the following day. Sends his regards to Myers' mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he and Nora are 'intensely interested' by Myers' letter. Claims that, taken in connection with their experience, 'the evidence for "spiritual [thoughtreading]" at least is strong in proportion to the improbability of unconscious self' on the part of both Nora and Myers. Does not think the evidence of identity strong, 'unless the statement about the M.S. turns out correct.' Claims that the long message seems 'vague; and the mention of Edward [ ] not very strong.' States that he has found it very difficult to think of questions to which Myers will not know the answers, but has put down some.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks him for sending him 'J'ai perdu..' [a translation of Alfred de Musset's poem Tristesse, which begins with these words], but claims that he is not altogether contented with it. Analyses parts of the poem in terms of its translation, and remarks, for example, that the second four lines do not seem to him 'to give Alfred's feeling.' Questions him in relation to 'the Translation of Faith [a poem by Myers] ', which he finds 'more than impressive.' Refers to 'the enclosed' [not included], which will show Myers how they have got on so far.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Claims to find Myers' verses 'very moving'. Goes on to list his objections in relation to its content. With regard to Sir B[ ], thinks it would be undignified to make an obvious effort to [ ] him, 'unless through some one who knows him personally.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks whether the 'I. of the S.' is proved or not. Wishes Myers to dine with him 'on Thursday at 7.15', and reports that his Anglo-Indian friends, the [Charles?] Bernards will be there, and he wishes them to hear Myers' 'additional evidence'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

In relation to Miss Brooke, declares that without being pretty, she is not ugly, and that her face 'shows feeling and intelligence when one looks close.' States however, that 'one has to penetrate a slight veil of dullness to see these qualities', and that 'there is not a particle of girlish attractiveness about her...' Asks Myers what he thinks of the proposal to tell Miss Clough that he [Myers] is a correspondent, and to arrange to go in some evening. In relation to the 'dear damsel', states that his experience of the correspondents [in the scheme for women's education] would not incline him to give a tragic interpretation to her silence. Refers to his own correspondents, who are all 'irregular and arbitrary in their ways, except one young strenuous well-trained governess in London, and the admirable and delightful Annie Thomas'. Announces that he is off to Rugby the following day, 'where the impending crisis [re headmaster Henry Hayman] still hovers. Invites Myers to breakfast on Sunday or Monday, 'and see one or two undergraduates.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that they are all going to London 'on the 6th', and he proposed to attend regularly from that time forward. Adds that he will come 'on the 4th', if Myers really wants him. States that five of them (including Lady Rayleigh and Nora) propose to attend 'from 6th to 17th, at Holland's invitation'. Reports that because he had not heard from him he 'concluded to put off Dakyns.' Reports that he has just heard 'the terrible news'. Asks Myers to write to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Is very glad to hear from Myers. Refers to his excuses about 'the stay of Capua'. States that he and Nora'shall be glad to hear about the Ghosts.' Invites him to Cambridge, and states that they shall be alone until 10 October. Refers to the 'Poem', which he describes as 'st[ ] and entertaining and pleasure-giving', but open to some criticisms, which he proceeds to set forth. Sends his kind regards to Myers' mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that a telegram has just arrived from Gurney to say that he will be [in Bradford] on Wednesday to begin investigations with Kershaw, the Southport Mesmerist. States that they have seen the Cl[ ] man twice, and professes to rather like him and think him honest, but reports that they have not got anything out of him yet, and is not very hopeful about his 'Clairvoyants'. Thinks, however, that he is worth trying further. Announces that they go to Sunderland the following day to see Ogle and his ' "[Dick]" '. States that he has looked up both the Leeds stories, and declares that [T ] is 'a very satisfactory person, but his story is slightly deteriorated by further information.' Finds that 'the other story's "William" is Dr G[ ]'s father', and he will write it out as he heard it from his father. States that it is not possible to find confirmation of the story, but that he has discovered 'that the "lecture of the eminent surgeon" was probably a paper before the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society' in April 1828 by William Hey. Thinks that the papers are still in existence, and has got Stephen Marshall to make enquiries. Announces that they return [to Cambridge] on the following Saturday or Monday. Hopes that Myers' family 'is in perfect wellbeing'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is going to Paris for the Easter vacation. Remarks that he has not received any letters from her, and presumes that she is busy 'on domestic cases'. Reports that he has not heard anything about Wellington College for a while, and asks how many boys there are there. Mentions that he saw a paragraph in the Times 'about chapel', and hopes that they have not all caught cold in going in and out. Asks after Martin, and wonders if he would remember Henry if he saw him. Reports that Arthur is leaving them now for the continent; thinks that he is wise in going abroad instead of going home before the Tripos list is out, 'because at home he would brood over it so much more.' Claims that he will be surprised if Arthur 'is anywhere else than 2d.'

Asks if she has played any more chess, and states that he has had a game or two since he came up to Cambridge, but finds that it has always interfered with his work. In relation to his Arabic, claims that 'it has languished rather of late', and believes that the only place where he can work well at a subject of that kind is a place like Dresden, where he can isolate himself completely. Nevertheless, he hopes to be pretty well advanced both in Arabic and in Hebrew by the end of the Long Vacation. Remarks that he has heard that 'there are ten volumes of Les Miserables', but that he has hitherto been able to read only the fourth. Believes that there are two volumes of Kinglake's history of the Crimea, but that he read the first three weeks previously, and has got no further.

Is going down to Rugby for a day or two at the end of the week; undertakes to avoid politics, and to discuss only 'the more interesting subject of Matrimony.' Reports that lately he has been reading ' "Ladies' advice to each other" in several little books, and flatter[s himself] that he knows a thing or two of [her] sex'. Claims that he did so because he hates 'being taunted as a Fellow of a College with ignorance of the female character'. Sends his love to Edward, and remarks that he has not heard 'that he is found out yet.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that on receiving Myers' 'excellent' news he 'went and settled with the P[etty?]s finally on the terms of Mrs P's last note.' Announces that they will probably come on 'Sat. 29th.' Announces tha the should be delighted to dine in [H]. Sq. on 13th if there is no séance', but asks ought they not to have [William?] Eglinton there. Says that he will dine on Wednesday wherever Myers likes, but doesn't particularly want it known that he is in town 'for this purpose', and therefore doesn't want the Savile [Club]. Adds that Gurney is 'ever so much better.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Tells him to send him more letters [from the project providing education by correspondence to women?], as they are charming. Discusses Myers' poem, in terms of its grammar and tone. In relation to another, un-named matter, states that he echoes Myer's last words, and asks 'who is worthy?' Adds that 'Fawcett bemoans loudly [Myers'] taking the pay of the Govt.', and says that he 'might have been M.P. for BIRMINGHAM!!!!!'

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that 'Raper will probably be in Savile Club on Thursday at 1.30 for Lunch', and that he has promised to meet him there and to persuade Myers to come along. States that he shall probably arrive at 13 A[ ] St. about 11.15, but certainly not later than 1. Adds that Raper 'was at the Club, but made No Calls'.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'Prof B[irks]. decided Tuesday' [ie was elected Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy at Cambridge], and claims not to care very much. Reports that he has seen Miss Brooke, with whom he had been corresponding, and reports that 'she is not so good as to make you put aside the idea of Miss Drew' to whom G[ ] H[ ] had introduced him.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Quotes an extract from a missive to him [from George Eliot], including an invitation to Sidgwick and Myers to lunch in Blackbrook, Southborough on 'Saturday the 4th', and gives directions as to arrive at Chislehurst by train. Sidgwick states that he shall very likely join the train at London Bridge, coming from Cambridge.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'Monday 16th to Wed 18th' would suit him and Nora 'excellently', except that he is occupied on Tuesday evening from 8.30 onwards. Asks him to write or telegraph if the above is not a reason for choosing other days, and Nora will write to Mr T[ ] immediately. Announces that they have room for Myers if he does not mind a very small room.

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that they are going to stay a night in London, and are only passing through. States that he will go up early and see Myers between 12 and 1, before lunching with Nora. Suggests Albemarle or elsewhere, and asks if this would suit. States that he wants much 'audire et [ ] voce[s]'.

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