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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he could not have 'a last word' with Myers the previous night, and explains that he had to 'bolt suddenly in order not to keep the Archaeologist waiting.' Hopes that, from what he said about Rayleigh, Myers does not think that Sidgwick should trust Rayleigh's or anyone's report of the phenomena more than Myers'. Explains that Rayleigh is more useful for his special purpose of convincing his p[ ] of the world'. Believes that 'the matter had better stop' if Rayleigh sends a very decided negative, but that if he is doubtful and Myers thinks Sidgwick could influence him, he would be willing to write to tell him that he is 'only prevented from joining by the personal dislike entertained for [him] by the medium', but that this does not affect his personal impression of her trustworthiness.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that he finds his letter 'profoundly interesting', and adds 'Poor Child!' in relation to its contents. Remarks that the only apparent merit of the 'C___l was a semblance of vulgar decency and respectability that seemed to hang about him.' Is unable to go and see her on Tuesday as he cannot leave Cambridge till the 4.30 train. Announces that on Tuesday 'this Nightmare of a Printing Press will be off [his] breast', but that he shall still be busier than usual in various ways. Expresses a desire to see Myers. States that he is thinking of being in town 'on Sunday the 27th'. Adds that he would be very glad to go to Cheltenham at Christmas, 'unless Sp[ ] should seem to indicate very clearly a [ ] of duty elsewhere: [which] is impossible.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Sidgwick.

Refers to the news [of her impending marriage to Edward White Benson], and explains that he has not spoken to her on the subject because 'it was Mamma's particular wish that it should not be spoken of.' Speaks of the delight he felt when he first heard of it, and of how the news seemed to him 'like the sudden realization of a fairy dream...' Speaks of his admiration for Edward, and of how the latter has almost become a part of their family. Tells her that they shall all miss her very much, and that he shall miss her especially, as his recent illness has taught him to be less selfish. Admits that they cannot grudge her to Edward, 'lonely as he must feel now after the life at Rugby...' Looks forward to the visits that he shall pay her. Prays for God's blessing to be upon herself and Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he has just returned to his work, and undertakes to do what he can about the ale. Urges her not to make the questions [on politics, see 100/19] 'a bore', and suggests that she think over any one of them 'at odd times', and put down any points she thinks she sees. Tells her to send her thoughts to him if she wishes any further light thrown on them. Hopes that she will get something out of Algebra.

Reports that she has been corresponding with Miss J[ex] Blake, who wants a medical degree. States that although opinion is advancing very fast in relation to female education, he fears that 'it has not yet got quite as far as that in [Cambridge]', and does not know what they can do for her. Asks if she saw his letter in the Spectator defending their Cambridge scheme for women's examinations. Claims that they [the reformers] 'hold the winning cards', and predicts that if they 'play quietly', they shall 'get the game without any fuss.' Fears that Gh[ ] 'is a frivolous little dog', with no taste for philosophy. Admits that he is intelligent, and hopes that 'some Political Economy and a little Logic may be driven into him.' Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to unknown recipient

Page headed 'PRO PATRIA'. Hopes that the addressee is coming up on Tuesday to the meeting of Fellows. Declares that it is 'a crisis in the history of the College.' Wishes for the scheme to pass, but thinks that it needs important alterations, 'which ought to be urged at this meeting on the 11th.' Lists the changes - with regard to staff, teaching posts and pensions within the College - that he believes ought to be made.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that he is resigning his fellowships after the next election, and intends to stay in Cambridge to lecture. Believes this to be 'a good thing on the whole - assuming that the College is not at present likely to take pains to get a really good teacher of Philosophy.' Explains why he had not taken such steps before. Asks what shall be said of the man 'who cares only for the highest things, and to those cannot attain?' [Note in Myers' hand: 'quotation from letter of mine to Noel. I was then a Christian.'] Tells Myers to read Ludibria Lunae [by W J Courthope], which is 'original and of it's [sic] kind masterly', and whose intellectual content is 'beneath contempt'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he shall not see Myers. Announces that he is probably to leave the Lakes on 1 September. Reports on the weather, and relates that they lunched 'on the Island' and saw some cousins [of Myers], 'especially Miss Theodosia', who quite impressed Sidgwick's mother. States that [G.O] Trevelyan is in Penrith, and that he is to be married in a month. Reports that Arthur 'is very exultant in Norway', and that he himself is to go to Cambridge 'to make ready the Batting against [Myers'] Bowling in November'. Hopes to see the latter then. Is unsure as to where he shall be living.] Reports that it is likely that he will get C.H. Pearson 'to lecture on History in Trin. Coll.' Asks if Myers liked Mrs Kitchener; declares that she is 'at Rugby somewhat of a symbol or a Banner.' Note [in Myers' hand]: 'I examined for the Moral Science Tripos in Nov/69. HS coached men for [ ]'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thinks that it would be difficult to find a replacement for Myers in the Moral Science Tripos [in which Myers examined]. Advises him to write to Sidgwick or some other member of the Moral Science Board as soon as he has made a decision. [Note in Myers' hand: 'I thought of going to Australia with the dying Ch[ ] Taylor']. Declares that he is curious to see [Alexander?] Macmillan. [Part of letter cut out and some words obscured at this point.] [Note in Myers' hand: Ludibria Lunae] In relation to Courthope, thinks that he should not have recommended Myers to read it. Claims that he did not write consciously as an advocate, and that the subject of the satire irritated him.

As regards [Roden] Noel, asserts that he wrote 'with a positively painful effort to be rigidly impartial'. Discusses his attitude to writing reviews: he never reviews anything 'which has not really interested [him], and which [he does] not think other people ought to read', while at the same time he 'feel[s] more in [his] element' when calculating appropriate amounts of praise and blame 'than when enthusiasm and sublime flights are wanted'. Suggests that if it be true that Myers cannot write a novel it is because he does not care enough 'about little things, and therefore [does] not observe them enough.' Asks Myers to tell him the author of Monsieur Madame et Bébé [book by Antoine Gustave Droz] when he writes.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Acknowledges receipt of two of Myers' letters, and declares that he was 'much delighted' with his praise. [Note in pencil: 're article on Clough'.] Claims that it ought to be fair, as he had taken pains to be precise in relation to the subject. Refers to Myers' accusation of Sidgwick 'praising too unreservedly' as a critic, saying that Myers is probably 'right generally' - though this does not come from 'kindheartedness' but from 'an instinct that catholicity is [his] line - but that he 'won't admit it in any particular instance'. Refers also to Courthope's work [Ludibria Lunae].

Discusses Myers' sonnets, which he enjoys, and makes some critical comments thereon. Remarks that the third one seems 'to combine to a great degree the exquisiteness of Tennyson with that of Christina Rossetti...' Undertakes to write again. States that he is 'busy canvassing for Jebb', and asks Myers to go up [to Cambridge] to vote for him on the following Tuesday week. [Note in Myers' hand: 'As Public Orator - Jebb was elected Nov. 2/69. I went up to vote.']

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers to Myers' intention to write a poem addressed to Sidgwick 'de rebus divinis'. Claims that this would interest and gratify him, but wishes to make clear his religious views, of which he fears Myers is not completely aware. Claims that if Clough had not lived and written he [Sidgwick] 'should probably be now exactly where he was', and that he 'can neither adequately rationalize faith, nor reconcile faith and reason, nor suppress reason.'

In 'an irreligious age one must not let oneself drift, or else the rational element of oneself is disproportionately expressed and developed by the influence of environment, and one loses the fidelity to one's true self'; does 'not feel called or able to preach religion except as far as it is involved in fidelity to one's true self. Believes 'that religion is normal to mankind, and therefore take[s] part unhesitatingly in any social action to adapt and sustain it (as far as a layman may)'. Also knows that his own 'true self is a Theist', but 'believe[s] that many persons are really faithful to themselves in being irreligious', and does 'not feel able to prophesy to them'; any complaint he has against them 'is not that they do not believe in a God, but that they are content with, happy in, a universe where there is no God ; but many of them are not content, and to these [he has] nothing to say, not being able to argue the matter on any common ground'.

Claims not to feel 'the passionate personal yearnings' that Myers puts into his verse, though he is 'wrought to much sympathy' when Myers expresses them. States that he has read Myers' poems through again, and remarks on 'the combination of great freshness...of feeling with finished elastic stateliness of style.' [Note in another hand: 'Written from somewhere in Germany'].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Urges Myers to print his poetry, referring to some minor objection he has to some of the contents of the [two sonnets], which 'both seem faultlessly magnificent in composition.' Confirms that Mrs Venn is ill, and explains that that is why he is 'lecturing for V. on Logic.' Reports that when he last heard of [ ] 'there was reported no hope', and states that he has not heard for a day or two. Remarks that it will be very hard to replace him. Adds that he does not like the title [of the sonnets], and that the 'W. and S....are both so peculiar.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he shall be delighted to write Myers' autobiography, but adds that he must see a good deal of him to do it well. Hopes that he is coming to visit soon. Remarks that Venn seemed to expect him 'in an official capacity' in the neighbourhood. Refers to Myers' letter, which he deems to be 'very interesting', and claims to be 'impressed by the tranquil objectivity of [his] descriptions.' [Part of the letter torn out at this point.] Declares that he feels terribly ignorant of the whole subject, and claims that he does not believe in deliberate choice in love. States that when he was 'young and erotion (cf. Clough)' he used to repeat to himself 'the end of Iphigenia's prayer (Goethe, favourite play of [his] for wholesome warning'. Quotes some lines.

Refers to Myers' work and inquires whether it leads to a permanency. Asks him to tell his [Myers'] mother that Sidgwick is '[temporarily] supplied with a President of [his] "Hall" ', Miss Clough having promised to start them; she is to come only for one or two terms, so Sidgwick is still looking for her successor, 'though more tranquilly'. Reports that he is now examining houses. Complains that '[t]his whole matter' takes up so much of his time, but believes that it is worthwhile. States that he is 'forced more and more into involuntary antagonism with Miss Davies', and reports that she wrote to him recently 'and mentioned affably that [he] was the serpent that was eating out her vitals.' Reports that he saw [ ] [deleted] 'the other day' in Cambridge, and now regrets 'that she could not come.' Declares that she is 'so very [ ] [ ]' [deleted], and understands why, under some circumstances she might strike some people as 'unconciliatory.' Sends greetings to Myers' mother, to whom he is very grateful for 'her exertions' on his [and others'] behalf. Refers to J.A. S[ymonds'] poem.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that a lady [Eliza Rhodes], with whom he is acquainted from his younger days when they were both 'in a Society for mutual improvement by means of correspondence' has written a paper 'on the Advisability of Educating Rural Young Women by means of Correspondence', and that the paper has been submitted to him. States that he has undertaken to try and organise 'a system of Education by Post, preparatory...for the C[ambridge] Examinations', and relating to [Cambridge] lectures. Wishes to ask Myers, as Superintendent of English for Home Study' what his colleagues and pupils are likely to think of this scheme, the main points of which he outlines.

Reports that he has just been staying with the Bibbys at Liverpool. Claims to enjoy talking to Miss Bibby, and does not 'at all dislike Mr and Mrs.' Declares that he wishes that 'people who do not read books would have always the courage of their unliterary convictions, like Jack Perkins of Downing College.'

Reports that he has been 'attending a North of England Council Meeting and making observations on women.' Remarks that they 'have not quite enough practical selfassertion at the right place and time, and hence are more apt to nurse small jealousies than men.' Declares himself to be 'in an ultra-philosophic humour', due to having mislaid his portmanteau. Reports that he is 'obambulating the Irish Channel, or circumambulating the Great [Orme's] Head, to keep off h[ay] f[ever].'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to [F.W.H. Myers?]

[Fragment of letter]. Declares that the addressee's letter 'is very interesting', and that he should like to hear more. Claims that he quite understands what his correspondent says about not being able to care for the opinions of others. Announces that Miss Bibby is going to accommodate him in Liverpool, where he is to go soon 'to cooperate [in] Movement in some manner.' States that he shall not be [in Cambridge] in July, but might stay for a night or two if his correspondent were to be there. Announces that he shall be at Llandudno 'till 3rd, Rugby till 9th and in Yorkshire towards the end of the month.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to [F.W.H. Myers?]

[Fragment of letter]. Undertakes to write about the addressee's book sometime. Reports that there is a review in the Pall Mall Gazette of that day '[26]', which is 'careful, considerate, instructive and only inappreciative because totally unsympathetic'. Regrets to hear that his correspondent is ' "devoting [himself] to the Muse" ', because, he claims, his genius 'does not want this devotion', being lyrical and not epic or dramatic, and because his 'mixture of vehemence and curiosity would make [him] a valuable politician.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is in the midst of scenery [in Carnarvon], 'which is not first-rate but very pleasing...', and comments on its similarity to the Lakes. Predicts that he shall enjoy himself much, as they have 'much exhilarating good fellowship and good talk at breakfast and in the evening: George Trevelyan, especially, being a well-spring of both.' States that he intends to be there for at least a week, returning to London probably early in September. Claims that he is behind with his work, and thinks that when the holiday is over, he shall have to work hard on till Christmas.

Asks her to thank their mother for her letter [101/176], which he intends to answer soon. Refers to [his cousin] Annie's remark as 'discriminative', and explains that the reason he chose to comment on 'that particular essay of Arnold's was not because it was the most impudent, but because it seemed the most complete and decisive enumeration of his theory of life.' States that he was glad to get Arthur's address, but does not think he will be sending a letter to him in Switzerland. Is glad to hear of her progress. Encloses 'a little poem' [not included], which he cut out of a magazine, and also 'a German effusion' of his [not included]. Advises her to get hold of Rückert's Selected works if she ever feels inclined to break new ground in German poetry. [Incomplete?]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Announces that he intends to go to Cambridge on Sunday or Monday [2 or 3 October]. He will be 'engaged in arranging female education' that week, and the following week 'shall probably have one or two pupils.' Invites Myers to come. Refers to Rhoades's poems and to 'Buchanan's Book of Orm', both of which he gives his opinion of. Claims that the Spectator has treated Myers 'capriciously', and does not understand it. Adds that '[p]eople [at Rugby] seem still to cherish a Gallows in their souls.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Undertakes to mention Myers' wishes in relation to the Moral Sciences Examination. Does not know 'who the other two [examiners] will be.' States that Mayor has been applied to. Is torn between 'a desire to get a good man and to do honour to the Tripos by getting a M. Sc. firstclass-man.' Says he 'quite accept[s Myer's] epithets for [D. G.] Rossetti's sonnets' which pleased him 'critically and classificatorily' since he discovered in Rossetti 'the "missing link" between Swinburne and Christina Rossetti'. Wishes Rossetti would write more.

Discusses Mozley's article on Modern poets in the Quarterly [Review], and claims that he is the first man 'who has spoken adequately of Clough.' Reports that there is a new edition of Clough in the press. States that he has not seen [Roden] Noel since he reviewed him. Remarks that 'that review has turned out unfortunate', and that '[R. H.?] Hutton likes the poems and therefore would have reviewed them...with his goldest pen.' Claims that he could not have said anything stronger in [Noel's] favour, and does not agree with Myers about the book. Declares that Markby 'is a little over enthusiastic about female prospects' and believes himself that 'the question is in a hopeful state.' Claims that 'there is no real conservatism anywhere among educated men.' Adds his opinion in relation to the use of 'esquire'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers favourably to one of Myers' poems. Discusses its form and content; remarks that there is 'nothing of the "tameness" ' in it that he perceived in Myers' last, and that he seems 'to have dropped the grave mature simplicity [which] Symonds etc admired so much in the last'. Refers to Goethe, whom Myers quotes in the work. Claims not to understand 'the last paragraph before the rhapsody', and states that he has 'jotted down a sort of abstract of the poem up to that point' to show Myers how it puzzles him. Announces that he would be happy to go to Eton for a few days after Easter, and that in Passion Week he intends to be vaccinated 'for the sake of mankind.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks Myers 'for the pamphlet', whose author Sidgwick wishes to discuss with him. While finding 'no attractive characteristicalness in her ideas, he is struck by 'the amazing quantity of her emotional impulsive force...' States that he is glad that Myers' 'plutological lines have fallen to [him] in pleasant places.' Refers to the questions raised by Myers, to which Sidgwick wishes to give an ethical solution. Adds that he always feels that he should like to be as many of 'the right sort of people' as possible. Reports that the headmaster - 'Stokoe, late of Richmond' - of the renovated grammar school at Reading has just called on him wanting a second master, 'mathematician to teach some science, salary £200-300 a year + a boarding house', and suggests that [Linnaeus?] Cumming might like it. Tells Myers to write to the latter if he thinks it worthwhile.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Discusses Myers' intention to take up medicine. Warns that it could be 'too great an investment of time and nervous energy. [Part of letter deleted by Myers?]. Remarks that there seems to be much to be said for the subject, but that it does not seem likely 'to lead to much poetry'. Of a poem by Myers about Alfred de Musset, remarks that he 'cannot quite divine the evolution of thought in the whole piece...' [A note in Myers' hand states that he put an end to the poem 'on the receipt of this criticism.' Announces that he intends to go to Hallsteads on the following Saturday for a day or two. States that his book is 'at a standstill. Reports that Roden Noel claims that 'all people whose taste has not been perverted by academic education regard him as Coming Poet', and so he can't stand Sidgwick anymore. [Partly deleted note by Myers refers to Roden Noel]

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Urges Myers to 'come up [to Cambridge]'. Reports that 'there is a great scheme of tutorial reform, one part of which comes on for voting.' States that he shall be up examining for minor schools. Has come to the conclusion that the 'I. P. of I. [Myers' poem The Implicit Promise of Immortality] is exceedingly good', but thinks that 'a p[oem] in classical style as an ancient Topic should not be published in a Shilling Mag.'

Postcard from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that '[C. H.?] Pearson is open to the offer about Saffron Walden', and wishes to hear details. Warns Myers not to come to Cambridge on 20 [November], unless he would like to meet the Ad Eundem (Society). Praises Myers' poem, but admits that he has not altogether made up his mind about it. States that he would like to hear more about the French Literature Scheme. Reports that [at Cambridge] they are 'thinking of nothing but war and academic reform.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Has received Myers' letter: would much like to come and see him at Cheltenham. Is going to Rugby for a week, and must be in Cambridge from 1 October, 'partly for ladies' lectures, partly to catch zealous pupils who are to be examined in November, and dialectically improve them before term begins.' Read Myers' poem Ammergau, in Macmillan's Magazine: it did not please him quite as much as 'the Roman poem', but he liked the close exceedingly.

Returned from Germany earlier than he had intended because of the [Franco-Prussian] war. Declares that his sympathies have turned round lately: 'there is something almost attractive about French conceit' and the image of a victorious German is unappealing. Fears that they shall miss each other at Rugby, and mentions that he may go down there again for a day or two if he finds the time, but envisages that they shall meet 'in town'. Offers to introduce him to [R. H.] Hutton. Remarks that 'the Spectator is not particularly good to write for as the editors do so much themselves'. [Note in Myers' hand: 'I thought at that time of taking to writing reviews'.]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks for information concerning Myers' coming to Cambridge, 'The Prospects of Poetry' and 'The Probabilities of Medicine etc etc'. Declares that they have much to discuss, Sidgwick having failed to write due to the unrealised expectation of seeing Myers at Rugby. Reports that he has to teach history that term, 'no successor having turned up to Pearson: and Cambridge breeding no historian'; they are 'thinking of taking some healthy young resident and locking him up with a Hume'; it is 'rather a disgrace to us that we all take so small an interest in the human race'.

Asks if he has seen Noel 'in the Dark Blue [a literary journal]'. Suggests that he may have been ashamed to send it to Myers, as 'some of the polemic is almost personal'. Declares that it is very well written, 'except the polemical part', and states that he writes better prose than verse. Reports that Noel nearly quarrelled with him 'for reluctantly avowing that [he] did not consider him an equal of Swinburne.' States that Noel 'thinks that the Verbal School (S[winburne?] Rossetti, etc - non sine te) have been found out'. Refers to the Edinburgh of July, and the Contemporary [Review] of October as having evidence to support this theory. States that Noel also thinks that 'Buchanan and R.N are going to be chaired instead by a mutable but at length appreciative public.' Refers to 'a certain Mutual Admiration league' between Noel and Symonds. Believes that Symonds's poetry could be successful, 'if he could only impassion himself about a good subject.'

Asks Myers to send his last epic. Tells him to read Noel's article. Sends his regards to Myers' mother. Announces that his second correspondence circular is soon to appear. Reports that Miss Clough is in Cambridge, that the house is 'getting on', and that there will be five [women] there that term.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he is unable to accompany Myers to Paris at Christmas, due to time constraints. [Myers adds a note that he had invited Sidgwick]. Has involved himself in 'so much Education and Educationalism' that he cannot really work in term time; he 'must write one or two books in the course of the following two or three years', and since he finds he writes 'slowly and with great labour', must work during the vacation. Claims that he is getting into a state of 'Book on the Brain', but that 'instead of one, there are at least three'. Invites Myers to come and see him, and claims that he has the effect of making him feel '- temporarily -Wise and Good.' Maintains that if he said that to [Roden] Noel, 'he would think [Sidgwick] meant in contrast with himself'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Tells her to send the papers to him, as he has not gone abroad. Explains that he is trying to cure his stammering in Cambridge. Expresses his regret at hearing of the 'inroads of illness', and remarks on how unfortunately she is situated 'in having no stock of young men near to impress', and states that at Rugby there are always recruits. Tells her to inform Arthur that he sits opposite Elliot, 'The ELLIOT [a reference to C. A. Elliott?]', in hall. Claims that he didn't know anyone there 'until Macfarlane dropped heavensent from the North Riding of Yorkshire. Claims that the people he knows have gone down for the vacation, and that he has forged Arthur's name to an order on the Union Library and buried himself in the literature of the eighteenth century. States that he is also reading 'Aids to Faith [edited by William Thomson], which seems good, except for Dr Mc Caul's contribution.' States that somebody is to be married, but he cannot remember whom, and refers to the piece of letter that he left out of his last missive.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he would like to alter the testimonial 'in two points', if Myers would send it to him. Hopes that he is 'coming up' [to Cambridge]. Reports that he is 'suffering from much depression of spirits from various causes...' Refers to Myers' statements on philanthropy. Believes that 'what are called the Rights of Conscience are being caricatured to a strange degree', and declares that 'it is a relief to find Huxley avowing that he does not accept "the modern doctrine of intention".' Refers to the Pall Mall Gazette and Saturday Review, stating that 'it is ridiculous for these journals to give themselves airs as if they had argued and the women merely declaimed - the reverse is much more true.' States that his idea of philanthropy is that 'it is a noble profession or career rather than a Virtue.' Would like to know Myers' opinion of Octavia Hill if he ever gets a chance to meet her.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Refers to Myers' visit to him, which was 'delightful and salutary'; says Myers always does him good, though he makes him 'feel more deeply the perplexities of conduct'. Wishes that he had 'more wisdom to impart to those whom' he loves. Sometimes 'console[s]' himself 'for fundamental scepticism' by feeling that it is 'necessary, if we are to choose Good per se; disagrees with Kant's view that this 'noble choice is the only good thing in man, but does himself think it 'a great good.'

States that Myers' narrative 'is of thrilling interest', and declares that he has no doubt that Myers was 'the right man for the situation'; refers to the 'Testimonial' [not included; note in Myers' hand explaining that this concerned 'a Schoolmistress who had got into a mess.'] Admits to being impressed 'at the thought of the amount of emotional electricity generated by [Myers'] passage through these feminine atmospheres', and offers to idealise him 'into a sort of Genius of Flirtation'.

Quotes from an unpublished poem of Myers'. [Myers quotes more extensively from the poem, beginning with the lines: 'Few are the Friends of Women; and they see On many a cheek the rose of amity,...'] Thanks him for his generous gift, and promises to tell of 'it's [sic] ultimate destination.' Sends greetings to Myers' mother, to whom he sends circulars [not included].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Explains his failure to write to Myers lately; he has been involved in 'memorializing Gladstone: entreating him to investigate and reform [Cambridge University] without unnecessary preludes and prefaces.' Reports that they collected one hundred and ten signatures, but that it fell to him, who has come to be regarded as 'Perpetual chief clerk and servant of all work' of the Liberal Party in Cambridge, to collect them. Declares that he thought Myers' circular 'excellent'. [Note in Myers' hand explains that the circular is of the Corresponding Society; 'Cambridge men teach young women [by] correspondence. Each sent out a circular to his pupils.'] Tells Myers to estimate his expenditure of time and trouble on the project.

Thanks him for [James] Saumarez' letter, which disposes him to accept Jebb's insight that Saumarez' nature resembles Myers'. [Notes in Myers' hand: 'I hope there is some truth in this', and 'letter later forthcoming - consisted principally of good advice....'] Announces that Arthur is to come [to Oxford] the following day. States that now that [Arthur and others] 'have got their Board ['the "promising Body" ', according to Myers], the puzzle is how to fashion it into an offensive [a reference to Arthur Sidgwick and other masters at Rugby's struggle against the head of the school, Henry Hayman].'

In relation to the women installed in Cambridge under his scheme for female education, whom he refers to as his 'Garden of Flowers' [referred to by Myers as Sidgwick's 'harem or collection of girls reading at Cambridge'], reports that 'Miss Kennedy yearns to attend Wards (Clough) Catholic ritual by herself on Sunday night, and [Sidgwick and others] refuse...' Predicts that 'Restraint of Liberty' for the women will be a problem in the future. Refers also to 'Emily Davies and the inevitable complication of educational machinery'. Announces that he intends to go to J.A. Symonds 'on the 26th', and is glad that he will also see Myers.

In relation to Middlemarch, claims that he feels he could have planned the story much better: does not think that the 'Dryasdust hero [Casaubon] need have been more than, say, thirty-five, and he might have had an illusory halo of vague spiritual aspirations; the ending could have been made just as tragic'. Says 'the style is the finest intellectual cookery'.

Praise Myers' 'French verses', and asks how he does them; he himself could not, despite having had 'the finest classical education'.

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