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Letters of Alexander Chisholm Gooden

  • GOOD
  • Fonds
  • 1831-48

Letters of Alexander Chisholm Gooden to his parents and close friends with some from his teachers/tutors to his parents with some letters of condolence after his death.

Gooden, Alexander Chisholm (1818-1841), classical scholar

Papers of C. D. Broad, Part II

  • BROD II
  • Fonds
  • 20th c.

Papers relating to psychical research and other occult subjects, the Perrott Fellowship, the Arthur Stanley Eddington Memorial Lecture, and the Swedish language, with group photographs relating to Dulwich College.

Broad, Charlie Dunbar (1887-1971), philosopher

Letter from Sylvia Pankhurst to Lord Pethick-Lawrence

West Dene, 3 Charteris Road, Woodford Green, Essex.—Praises his radio broadcast (a programme of reminiscences entitled ‘I Remember …’, broadcast on 27 May).

(Letter-head of the New Times and Ethiopia News. Sylvia Pankhurst is named as Editor.)

Papers of Rush Rhees

  • RHEE
  • Fonds
  • 1951-89

The papers in this archive consist of papers created by Rhees in his role as literary executor of the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein

Rhees, Rush (1905-1989), philosopher

Papers of Frank Adams

  • ADMS
  • Fonds
  • 1949-89

The collection is particularly noteworthy for its coverage of Adams's lectures, research and incoming correspondence.
Section A, Biographical, is not substantial. It includes a little material of Adams's relating to his own career including three Bedford School notebooks and his PhD thesis, and material assembled by I M James during the preparation of his Royal Society memoir.
Section B, Research, provides extensive documentation of Adams's research from the 1950s until his death. It is presented in an alphabetical sequence arranged by subject title.
Section C, Lectures, is the largest in the collection. Two subsections comprise Adams's lecture notes and other teaching material for courses given at Manchester and Cambridge, and material from conferences and seminars attended by Adams throughout the world including drafts of Adams's contributions and notes of contributions by others. A third subsection consists of Adams's ms notes found in filing cabinet drawers labelled 'Other people's lectures'. It includes notes taken by Adams as an undergraduate at Cambridge in 1949.
Section D, Publications, is very slight. It includes drafts of a few of Adams's scientific papers.
Section E, Correspondence, contains virtually no extended exchanges of correspondence as very few copies of Adams's own letters survive. There is, however, significant correspondence from colleagues such as M F (later Sir Michael) Atiyah, M G Barratt, P J Hilton, I M James and S MacLane, sometimes extending over a period of twenty or thirty years.

Adams, John Frank (1930-1989), mathematician

Papers of G. K. Batchelor

  • BACH
  • Fonds
  • 1940-2000

Most, if not all of Batchelor’s papers were left in his rooms at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and transferred after his death to Trinity College Library by Professor Keith Moffatt. His surviving papers reflect his wide professional interests. Section H contains manuscripts and working materials for many of his publications. Section I contains notes on various aspects of his subject which he produced throughout his career, many of which are dated. Section K contains texts of conference and special lecture that he gave (faculty lectures are to be found in section D9). Papers relating to his work at DAMTP are in section D and his copious scientific correspondence in section F

Batchelor, George Keith (1920-2000), fluid dynamicist

Papers of Sir Peter Shaffer

  • SHAF
  • Fonds
  • 1940-2016

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, diaries, photographs, and printed material which document the life and work of playwright Sir Peter Levin Shaffer.

Shaffer, Sir Peter Levin (1926-2016), knight, playwright

Papers of Sir Anthony Epstein

  • EPST
  • Fonds
  • 1937-2015

These papers consist of material from throughout Sir Anthony's scientific career. They include personal materials, professional diaries, laboratory research notebooks and electron micrograph images, working papers and professional correspondence, documents and illustrations related to publications and presentations, and paper reprints.

Series A: Personal Material contains personal materials belonging to Sir Anthony. These items include personal photographs, gifts and mementos, newspaper cuttings, taped lectures and interviews, professional and academic certificates, and other items commemorating the honours Sir Anthony received throughout this career.

Series B: Professional Diaries, Address Book, and Shorthand Notebooks contains Sir Anthony's professional appointment diaries at the Bland-Sutton Institute at the Middlesex Hospital, the Department of Pathology at the University of Bristol, the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine at the University of Oxford, and Wolfson College, Oxford. Sub-series B/5 is a collection of shorthand notebooks from 1981–1987.

Series C: Laboratory Research Notebooks and Photographic Material contains Sir Anthony and his collaborators' laboratory notebooks, along with images of experiments. The notebooks detail a number of techniques for growing malignant cells, isolating the Epstein-Barr virus, and imaging experimental samples. Sub-series C/2 contains three notebooks belonging to Dr Bert G. Achong. Achong co-discovered the Epstein-Barr virus alongside Sir Anthony and Dr Yvonne Balding (née Barr) using electron microscopy imaging techniques. Sub-series C/7 contains photographs and negatives of experiments.

Series D: Working Papers and Correspondence contains papers, correspondence, and notes from Sir Anthony's lectures, meetings, conferences, and travels, as well as a range of files relating to Sir Anthony's professional life. It provides a broad as well as in-depth picture of Sir Anthony's working life. Main aspects dealt with include: historical significance of the Epstein-Barr virus, advisory and consultation work, the wide spectrum of research work, general correspondence, personal matters, publications and broadcasting, and professional and academic societies and organizations. More detailed summaries about the papers are available in each sub-series description. Types of papers include correspondence, reports, and discussion, working, and meeting papers.

Series E: Publications and Papers Presented contains materials related to publications and presentations developed from Sir Anthony's research. These include theses and publications by Sir Anthony and researchers in his laboratories, review papers, book contributions, and illustrations for publications and presentations.

Series F: Reprints and Journal References contains a range of material related to reprints of Sir Anthony's journal publications. In the sciences, reprints (or offprints) are often kept by authors for distribution to collaborators and peers. Sir Anthony kept a numbered file of reprints, in order of publication. These collected reprints are contained in this series, as well as reprint request slips, and a list of reprint recipients. Sub-series F/5 is an index of papers references by Sir Anthony in his publications.

Epstein, Sir Michael Anthony (b. 1921), knight, pathologist

Papers of Robert Robson

  • ROBS
  • Fonds
  • 1936-91

These papers mainly comprise publications, notes, and correspondence relating to aspects of Trinity College history. There are also papers of College committees of which Robson was a member and drafts of unpublished works.

Robson, Robert (1929-1995), historian

Papers of John Wisdom

  • WISD
  • Fonds
  • 1923-90

The archive includes diaries 1952-59, records of self-analysis 1939-59, correspondence 1925-1980s, student notes of G E Moore's lectures 1923-24, academic papers (many fragmentary) ?1920s-1980s

Wisdom, Arthur John Terence Dibben (1904-1993), philosopher

Papers of Francis Aston

  • ASTN
  • Fonds
  • 1920-42

Writings, printed material, and miscellaneous material relating to both editions of F. W. Aston's 'Isotopes' and both editions of the later revision, 'Mass-spectra and Isotopes'.

The writings include an incomplete[?] draft of the first edition of 'Isotopes' written in Aston's hand [ASTN 1], some pages written on the verso of minutes of the British Association for the Advancement of Science [ca 1920-1923], with related notes and including a postcard from Hugh Frank Newall dated Dec. 193[?] about a reference found in [Antonius] van den Broek [ASTN 1/104]; other drafts are a combination of typescript and printed material with emendations in Aston's hand and that of a typesetter, some of it written on C. P. Snow's letterhead., with original material for the plates and figures [ASTN 2, 4, 7, 8].

Accompanied by printed copies of 'Isotopes' which contain some edits and have been cut up for use in the revision [ASTN 3, 6], and a typescript letter from F. P. Dunn of Edward Arnold Publishers dated Nov. 1923 sending unbound copies of 'Isotopes' for his use [ASTN 5]. Also accompanied by offprints of other works, also with emendations and cut sections [ASTN 9], and a letter from F. A. Towle of the Royal Society in July 1927 returning figures for his Bakerian Lecture [ASTN 10].

Aston, Francis William (1877-1945), physicist

Papers of Ludwig Wittgenstein

  • WITT
  • Fonds
  • 1914-51

The largest surviving portion of Wittgenstein's nachlass containing his working papers 1914-1951

Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johann (1889-1951), philosopher

Papers of Frederic William Watkyn-Thomas and Diana Watkyn-Thomas

  • WATK
  • Fonds
  • 1913-63

Diaries kept by Frederic Watkyn-Thomas (36 items, 1926-1963); diaries kept by Diana Watkyn-Thomas (27 items, 1929-1952), including her "Diaries of the War" series (12 volumes, 1939-1943) with another war diary not so titled from 1944. Both series include holiday diaries jointly written by husband and wife, describing their regular fishing trips to Scandinavia and Iceland and long summer stays there. Frederic revised all the diaries in the last ten years of his life, adding dates and specifications such as '?Our last visit to Kolåsen' (B25); he also used a printed diary for 1956 to create a summary of the main events of his life from 1906 onwards, recording events on each day in previous years such as theatre performances, letters received, reunion dinners in College and holidays. He also revised the commonplace books in which he collected newspaper cuttings, wrote book revisions, reported conversations, and noted his observations on specific subjects throughout his life; in these revisions he added dates, subjects, and re-arranged the contents.

Thomas, Frederic William Watkyn- (1887-1963), surgeon

Papers of Harold Davenport

  • DAVT
  • Fonds
  • 1911-86

The papers consist of correspondence, school notebooks, research notes and drafts, diaries, photographs, and publications documenting most aspects of Davenport's life and work. His contributions to his subject as student, teacher, writer and researcher, are well documented and the collection as a whole is of pedagogical interest. Less fully represented are his extensive travels for visits and conferences (which can sometimes only be deduced from a jotted heading on a lecture script) and his work for the London Mathematical Society.

The 60 boxes of material are organised into seven series: Biographical and personal papers, School and university notebooks and lecture notes, Lectures and addresses, Publications, Research notes and drafts, Faculty of Mathematics, Cambridge and Correspondence.

Series A, Biographical and personal papers, includes Davenport's unpublished reminiscences and reflections on his life's work, written shortly before his death with the assistance of his wife and his colleague D. J. Lewis (A.8-10). Other documentation on his career includes, unusually, his examination scripts and marks awarded at Manchester University in 1927 preserved by his principal tutor, L. J. Mordell (A.30-31).

Series B, School and university notebooks and lecture notes, is a record of mathematical teaching at Manchester 1924-1927 (B.23-54) and Cambridge 1927-1932 (B.55-92), by means of Davenport's notes, carefully taken and preserved, of lecture courses, class work and exercises.

Series C, Lectures and addresses, is a substantial section representing Davenport's own contribution to the teaching of mathematics from the 1930s as a Research Fellow in Cambridge through his various university appointments and lectures abroad, including the lectures at Michigan, later published in book form (C.115-124). Several of these contain sets of problems and solutions, and some examination material. On a less technical note is the address given in 1947 at Accrington Grammar School, Davenport's old school (C.131). A new generation in the filiation of mathematics is represented by the notes on Davenport's lectures at London in 1946 made by C. A. Rogers, his research student, collaborator and eventual successor as Astor Professor (C.167).

Series D, Publications, includes drafts, sometimes accompanied by correspondence with collaborators (see especially D.110-120) or publishers, for Davenport's many papers. These have been linked wherever possible to the numbered list in the Bibliography appended to the Royal Society Memoir by C. A. Rogers and others (Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 17, 1971). In addition, there is considerable material relating to work not listed in the official bibliography: this includes Davenport's books, The higher arithmetic (D.89-92) and Multiplicative number theory (D.170-182), book reviews (D.208), unpublished work (D.201-203) and a posthumous publication (D.207).

Series E, Research notes and drafts, contains a variety of material: paginated narrative sequences perhaps intended for lectures or papers, notes and calculations often on problems arising from work by others, and miscellaneous shorter unidentified notes. There is in consequence some potential overlap with other series, notably C and D. Of interest is the collaborative work with Helmut Hasse arising from Davenport's period in Marburg (E.1-15). Davenport's notes of lectures and talks by others (E.103-126) include mathematicians of an older generation (K. Mahler, L. J. Mordell, C. L. Siegel), friends and contemporaries (P. Erdös, H. A. Heilbronn), and pupils and successors (B. J. Birch, J. W. S. Cassels, C. A. Rogers, K. F. Roth). Another link in the pedagogic chain is J. E. Littlewood's extended list of 'Research Problems' and Davenport's 'Comments' (E.131)

Series F, Faculty of Mathematics, Cambridge, is small but includes a little material on research, examinations and the newly-created Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

In Series G, Correspondence, Davenport's links as student, teacher and collaborator with several generations can be traced. Early correspondence with E. A. Milne (G.206) and L. J. Mordell (G.208) feature their recognition and fostering of Davenport's talent, and that with E. Bombieri (G.28-39), D. J. Lewis (G.175-184) and C. A. Rogers (G.268-278), among many others, indicate his continuing contributions. Special mention must be made of Davenport's close connection with German mathematicians, several of whom he met during his early visits to Marburg and elsewhere and whom he helped and encouraged when they were forced to emigrate: see his correspondence with H. A. Heilbronn (G.123-142), H. Kober (G.165), K. Mahler (G.194-201), and R. Rado (G.257). There is also correspondence with H. Hasse (G.116-122), who remained in Germany. Davenport's command of the language is evident both in the correspondence and in the drafts for lectures and papers elsewhere in the collection.

Davenport, Harold (1907-1969), mathematician

Papers of Walter Ullmann

  • ULLM
  • Fonds
  • 20th c.

The papers consist of writings, correspondence, lecture notes, printed material, personal papers, photographs, and audiovisual material relating to Walter Ullmann's life and work.

Ullmann, Walter (1910-1983), historian

Lectures by D. A. Winstanley on Constitutional History

  • WINS
  • Fonds
  • c. 1906-35

Sixty-six lectures on constitutional history written in Winstanley's hand on loose sheets of paper, each headed with a lecture number and title, accompanied by a holograph book list relating to study of the 16th century and an incomplete lecture/review? on George I and his relationship with his Cabinet and Secretaries of State. The items are undated but presumably date from one of Winstanley's tenures at Cambridge, i.e. 1906-14 and 1919-35.

Winstanley, Denys Arthur (1877-1947), historian

Papers of Lord Adrian

  • ADRN
  • Fonds
  • c. 1910-78

The papers contain faculty and special lectures, academic correspondence, scientific notebooks, letters and papers as Master of Trinity and President of the Royal Society, papers relating to the Natural Sciences Club, papers relating to the Cambridge Post-Expressionist exhibition and the diaries of Hester Adrian.

Adrian, Edgar Douglas (1889-1977), 1st Baron Adrian, physiologist

Papers of C. D. Broad, Part I

  • BROD
  • Fonds
  • 1903-71

Although there is some useful autobiographical material including diaries and family correspondence among the papers, the bulk of the material relates to Broad's working life. The detailed faculty lectures, many of which were later published, are preserved as are other lectures that Broad gave from time to time. Notes of the works of others are also among the papers, with Broad's comments, but little of Broad's own notes in preparation for his lectures and publications survive. There are also eight undated notebooks on subjects related to psychical research. Additionally, there are a few classical papers of Arthur Verrall, which Broad was presumably given due to the SPR connection with the family and some papers of John Chadwick on mathematical and philosophical subjects

Broad, Charlie Dunbar (1887-1971), philosopher

Papers of Lord Layton

  • LAYT
  • Fonds
  • 1902-66

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, printed material, documents, photographs and other materials covering all aspects of Layton's career and interests. Amongst them are papers about the setting up of the Ministry of Munitions in World War I, and the Ministry of Production in World War II; reparations negotiations; the development of 'The Economist' and the 'News Chronicle'; the first conference of the League of Nations after World War I; the beginnings of the Council of Europe; the Simon Commission; and the Liberal Industrial Enquiry.

Layton, Walter Thomas (1884-1966), 1st Baron Layton, economist and newspaper proprietor

Papers of Sir Alan Hodgkin

  • HODG
  • Fonds
  • 1902-2000

This sizable archive contains the following materials. Biographical and autobiographical material 1914-2000, school and college papers 1919-36, honours and awards 1936-87, family correspondence and papers 1902-77, personal correspondence 1937-81, administrative papers relating to University and College 1938-89, research notebooks 1934-87, research files 1935-91, publications 1838-88, lectures and speeches 1950-87, papers relating to visits and conferences 1961-98, papers relating to societies and organisations 1938-89, correspondence 1945-90, photographic materials 1937-72

Hodgkin, Sir Alan Lloyd (1914-1998), knight, physiologist

Papers of G. T. Lapsley

  • LAPS
  • Fonds
  • 1901-48

The papers consist of writings, research papers, printed material, photographs, and miscellaneous materials, and are arranged into seven series: A. Book Reviews by Lapsley of the books of others; B. Notes on Edith Wharton and Henry de Bracton; C. Lecture Notes: files of documents including notes, bibliographies and narrative sequences used in planning 'English Constitutional History to 1485'; D. Pamphlets, Journals and Books; E. Manuscript index cards, in sections, of books relevant to Lapsley's work; F. Photographs; G. Miscellaneous.

The writings reflect Lapsley's interest in medieval history, with a sizeable amount of work on Henry de Bracton, amongst others. Other papers reflect his work as Edith Wharton's literary executor, and a selection of her material survives in this collection, such as a transcript of her speech to the American Academy of Arts and Letters on accepting the Gold Medal for her services to Letters.

There are also a number of lecture notes and reviews published in the 'Cambridge Review' and other periodicals, and a variety of letters from friends, editors and fellow historians.

The printed materials are a mixture of historical journals and college documents including the WWII roll of honour. The photographs consist of three cabinet card photographs, one of them a duplicate, of two images of Edith Wharton posing with dogs.

Lapsley, Gaillard Thomas (1871-1949), American constitutional historian

Salter Papers

  • SALT
  • Fonds
  • 1901-71

The papers concern psychical research, in particular the concept of cross-correspondence in the writings of automatic writers, and consist of automatic scripts by Margaret and Helen Verrall (later Helen Salter), with notes and correspondence relating to these and the writings of other automatists active during the early decades of the twentieth century, including those of Alice Fleming ("Mrs Holland") and Winifred Coombe Tennant ("Mrs Willett"). In addition, there are 32 privately printed volumes, including various scripts edited by the Verralls, J. G. Piddington, Alice Johnson, and G. W. Balfour; Piddington's nine-volume analysis 'Notes and Excursuses' and W. H. Salter's 'Introduction to the Study of Scripts'.

Salter, William Henry (1880-1969), lawyer and psychical researcher

Papers of Otto Frisch

  • FRSH
  • Fonds
  • 1899-1981

The papers consist of correspondence, research notes, writings, documents, publications, photographs, glass slides, films, and audiotapes documenting all stages of Otto Robert Frisch's life, and include Frisch's collection of the papers of his aunt, the physicist Lise Meitner. The 70 boxes of material are organised into seven series: Biographical and personal papers; Scientific research; Lectures and publications; Radio, television, films; Visits and conferences; Correspondence; and Non-print material.

Series A, Biographical and personal papers, is particularly full, incorporating material relating not only to Frisch's own career and interests including music (A.86-90) and sketching (A.84, 233-249), but also to Frisch’s extended family. These have historical interest as an example of the diaspora of the Thirties, and in the case of Lise Meitner a more specific scientific interest complementing other material deposited elsewhere. Lise Meitner's papers appear primarily in this series (A.134-211), and consist of correspondence, most of which is with Frisch and her younger brother Walter, as well as drafts of lectures, photographs, and miscellaneous papers. Several of her letters appear elsewhere in the collection (C.55, D.55, and F.15) and she is the subject of letters and articles throughout. Series F contains photocopies of letters written to her from Otto Hahn in December 1938 (F.52) and Series G includes photographs of her as well as an undated audiotape of a conversation between Frisch and Meitner (G.31).

Series B, Scientific research, includes notebooks, laboratory notes and calculations, publication drafts and correspondence. It presents a full record for the periods of work at Hamburg and Copenhagen, but the wartime work on the atomic bomb project is under-represented due to the security restrictions placed on the work. B.209-220 are documents relating to nuclear fission in the first half of 1939: correspondence between Frisch in Copenhagen and his aunt Lise Meitner in Sweden, correspondence between Frisch and Niels Bohr at Princeton, two drafts of Bohr's paper on the disintegration of heavy nuclei and correspondence between Frisch and Nature. The series also contains Frisch’s original eyewitness account of the Trinity Test (B.135), and a letter from Louis, identified as Louis Slotin by Sir Rudolf Peierls, written a month before Slotin's fatal accident (B.136A). Also present is an item added later by the Contemporary Scientific Archives Centre which provided the original cataloguing of the collection, a photocopy of the official report on Frisch's work at Los Alamos drawn up in August 1946 (A.58A). For the later period, the paucity of material relating to the Cavendish Laboratory reflects Frisch's lack of interest in administrative and committee work and his preference for relatively small-scale experimental projects such as his scanning device, and the various constructions and gadgets which he continued to devise for his Laser Scan company to the end of his life.

Series C, Lectures and publications, and D, Radio, television, films illustrate Frisch's expository skills in the written and the spoken word; he was greatly in demand as a lecturer, and the broadcasting services made regular calls on his multi-lingual gifts. There are drafts, correspondence, and printed material related to Frisch's lectures and publications, and drafts of scripts, correspondence, contracts and receipts related to Frisch's work in radio, television, and film.

Series E, Visits and conferences, varies in content from brief notices or programmes to substantial folders including correspondence on scientific matters, arrangements for lectures, publications, and travel, as well as visits to friends. It should be noted that many of the important meetings of the Thirties were held at the Institute of Theoretical Physics at Copenhagen where he worked. E.64-76 contains material relating to the commemoration meeting for Bohr held at Copenhagen in 1963. The material in Section G, Non-print materials, provides a supplementary photographic record of meetings and conferences.

The correspondence in Series F dates mainly postdates 1947 and Frisch's establishment in Cambridge. Very little survives for 1943-1947 due to security restrictions at Los Alamos. Incoming scientific correspondence for the earlier period 1930-1943 is less well documented and was usually kept by Frisch with relevant research notes. Incoming personal letters for those years appear mainly in the 'Family correspondence and papers' in Series A. During the Thirties, Frisch kept copies of his outgoing letters in chronological folders where correspondence of all kinds and in several languages is juxtaposed. In a letter to Margaret Hope of 14 September 1936, Frisch explains 'I like to keep a duplicate of all my letters, it is like a diary for me'. This material remains in its original order, at B.39-42, B.73-81.

Series G, Non-print material, consists of photographs, film, glass plate slides, photographic slides, and audiotapes. The photographs include those by his aunt and noted photographer Lotte Meitner-Graf (G.10, 12, 18). The film includes those taken at Copenhagen and the Bohr’s holiday home Tisvilde in 1937 (G.21), and at post-war conferences (G.22). The glass plate slides were created to accompany lectures (G.23-28). There is also an audio recording of an undated conversation between Lise Meitner and Frisch (G.31).

Frisch was fluent in German, Danish, and English, and read other languages, and so the collection is multi-lingual as well. He continued to use Danish and German for lectures, speeches or correspondence to the end of his life; English became his language of choice for writing. Another feature of the collection is evidence of Frisch’s gift for sketching, particularly of caricatures of colleagues; there are some specific samples of his drawings, but others are scattered throughout the collection, on letters, conference programmes, and menus. Shortly before his death in 1979 Frisch published his autobiography What little I remember (Cambridge University Press), giving an informal account of his life mainly up to 1947. This has been drawn upon as a basis for dating material, and catalogue entries cite references in the book. The memoir by R.E. Peierls for the Royal Society of London, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (27, 1981) has been drawn upon and referred to in the catalogue as well.

Frisch, Otto Robert (1904-1979), physicist

Papers of Sir Arthur Eddington

  • EDDN
  • Fonds
  • 1897-1982

Eddington, Sir Arthur Stanley (1882-1944), knight, theoretical physicist and astrophysicist

Papers of Huia Onslow

  • ONSL
  • Fonds
  • 1896-1924

This collection does not contain a great quantity of personal material: there is no correspondence with family and friends, for example; there is however a manuscript account of a tour by yacht on the Norfolk Broads in 1903, perhaps by Huia Onslow's governess Helen Moodie as well as creative work by Huia Onslow, such as poetry and a short story, and his translations of poems from Joachim du Bellay's Amours. There is also a group of letters relating to Onslow's stay for health reasons at Banchory, Scotland, in 1913, mainly concerning the choice of house and payment of rent. Financial and legal material includes correspondence between Onslow and his solicitors regarding duties payable on the death of his father William, 4th Earl of Onslow, in 1911, statements of rent received from properties in London account books (including a record of laboratory expenses, 1918-1922), and an inventory and valuation of furniture at Onslow's house made after his death.

Despite the lack of personal correspondence, the papers include a large number of letters. Significant groups include: Onslow's correspondence with J. Donovan, sparked by Donovan's advert in the Athenaeum magazine asking for a physicist to provide him with help on 'an original line of inquiry bearing on the explanation of Life and Mind in exclusively physical terms'; correspondence with various members connected to the Eugenics Education Society (1914-1920) relating to Onslow's work for them; and letters relating to Onslow's work as secretary for the Anaesthetics Emergency Fund of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Families Association (1915-1916), particularly over-seeing contributions from New Zealand.

Correspondence relating to Onslow's own work includes: letters to and from George MacElwee and Frederick Fletcher in response to Onslow's advertisement in the Times as 'A Struggling Scientist' seeking funds for his research (1914-1915); letters between Onslow, William Auton, and Helen Moodie regarding the breeding of rabbits and mice (1914-1915), as well as letters from H. W. Blake, Mabel Illingworth, and W. S. Singleton on the same subject. There is however no correspondence with Sydney Cole (except for a 1914 bill from Cole for private tution), Muriel Wheldale or other scientists.

Onslow's scientific research is well represented in the form of notes: most of the material in this category is in the form of notebooks recording record his investigations into genetics and biochemistry from 1912 onwards, such as three large books on Onslow's programme of breeding rabbits for colour, and books concering his research into pigmentation in insects (butterflies and beetles) and birds. Also present is a fair quantity of loose material on experiments relating to trytophan, probably the work which led to his (posthumously published) paper on the subject. Onslow's interest in hypnosis is also reflected in his loose notes, which include observations from a series of hypnosis sessions in 1912.

There are also drafts of several of Onslow's articles, some later published, others seemingly unpublished, and offprints of the majority of his published articles. Finally, there are a few textbooks, presumably used by Onslow as an undergraduate.

Onslow, Victor Alexander Herbert Huia (1890-1922), biochemist

Papers of Sir Walter Greg (W. W. Greg)

  • GREG
  • Fonds
  • 1893-1958

This collection includes correspondence—mainly letters to Greg from fellow-bibliographers and literary scholars—notes, photographs of books and manuscripts, cuttings, a few small printed items, and the manuscript of part of Some Aspects of London Publishing.

Greg, Sir Walter Wilson (1875-1959), knight, literary scholar and bibliographer

Papers of Richard Synge

  • SYNG
  • Fonds
  • 1892-1996

This large collection is uneven in its coverage but papers survive from all phases of Synge's life and career.

Section A, Biographical, is extensive. The personal material includes pocket diaries 1926, 1945-1992. There are records of Synge's childhood in the form of school work, reports and printed material, and of his time as an undergraduate at Trinity College Cambridge, principally his lecture notes and work sheets. Documentation of Synge's later career, honours and awards is patchy but there is material relating to the award of the 1952 Nobel prize for Chemistry to Synge and A.J.P. Martin. There is much family material, including correspondence between his parents during their courtship and after their marriage, and their correspondence with him, including many letters during Synge's time at Old Hall School, Winchester College and Trinity College. Family material also includes correspondence with his wife Ann and his sisters Anthea and Katharine. Synge's political interests are not particularly well documented although there is material relating to the Communist Party in the 1940s, the Society for Cultural Relations with the USSR 1946-1955 and to his later links with the peace movement including Scientists Against Nuclear Arms 1981-1991. The section also includes many photographs.

Section B, Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine, is slight. It includes correspondence and papers relating to Synge's appointment including his statement of proposed work, inventories of equipment and chemicals, and miscellaneous administrative material. There are also papers relating to Synge's visit to Tiselius's laboratory at the Fysikalisk-Kemiska Institution in Uppsala, Sweden.

Section C, Rowett Research Institute, presents documentation of Synge's appointment to the Institute, his headship of the Department of Protein and Carbohydrate Chemistry - including research programmes, equipment and staff, the Agricultural Research Council Visiting Groups to the Institute, and administrative material including sets of Institute notices and circulars. There is also material relating to the Institute's Strathcona Club of which Synge was a loyal member, and a little memorabilia.

Section D, Food Research Institute, is not extensive. It includes correspondence and papers relating to Synge's appointment including his plan of research, comments on Lord Rothschild's 1971 Green Paper A Framework for Government Research and Development, administrative papers from the Chemistry Division, and project reports on Synge's research.

Section E, Research, comprises notebooks and research notes. The notebooks document Synge's research from postgraduate studies in the mid 1930s, through work for the Wool Industries Research Association in Leeds - including the invention and development of partition chromatography, the Lister Institute, Rowett Research Institute and Food Research Institute, to post-retirement work in the 1990s on electronic storage of chemical information. The bulk of the notebooks forms a sequence I-XXVII running from 1938 to ca 1979. There are also notebooks used for references from searches of the Science Citation Index and notebooks used by three collaborators, J.C. Wood, M.A. Youngson and S. Matai. The research notes cover the period 1938-1987. They include reports on work on proteins for the Wool Industries Research Association 1938-1943, wartime work on grass protein 1939-1943 and gramicidin S 1944-1946, studies on the nutritive value of by-products of the herring industry 1949-1951, and papers relating to computer searching for chemical information searches 1981.

Section F, Publications, lectures and broadcasts, documents some of Synge's scientific publications 1940-1992, public lectures 1942-1983 and broadcasts 1947-1961. The publications material is not comprehensive. There are relatively few drafts of Synge's biochemistry publications and the best documented work is Synge's 1990 article '25 years of Science Citation Index - some experiences'. There are translations of articles in the Soviet scientific literature on gramicidin S and correspondence and papers relating to the possible translation from the Russian of Mikhail Semenovich Tsvet 1872-1919 by E.M. Senchenkova. There is also editorial correspondence. Lectures material includes documentation of some of the many public and invitation lectures Synge gave to local and university branches of learned societies and professional associations. They include his 1951 Second P.F. Frankland Memorial Lecture, 'Biological aspects of proteins in the light of recent chemical studies' to the Royal Institute of Chemistry and the Institution of Electrical Engineers. Again, there are few drafts, the bulk of the material is correspondence regarding arrangements. The section also includes drafts found in Synge's two folders inscribed `Unpublished etc' including book reviews and drafts on the history of science, and a set of the collected off-prints of Synge's published work. References to Synge's publications in this catalogue refer to the List of Publications at A/1 and appear in the form Bibliog. ...

Section G, Visits, conferences and travel, covers the period 1945-1992. The most extensively documented visit is Synge's extended stay in New Zealand 1958-1959. There is correspondence relating to arrangements, documentation of Synge's research and material relating to other engagements fulfilled during his stay. There is also material relating to the return journey, including travel on the Trans-Siberian railway. Other visits for which significant documentation survives are the 1955 International Wool Textile Research Conference in Australia, the International Symposium on the Origins of the Earth, Moscow, USSR, 1957, Synge's visits to India as a guest of the Indian Statistical Institute in 1965, 1966 and 1970, and his visit to Cuba in May 1969. There is also material relating to Synge's award of the Nobel Prize. He attended gatherings of Nobel laureates at Lindau, West Germany on several occasions and returned to Stockholm for other Nobel-related events. Synge often took his family on his visits and this is sometimes reflected in the material.

Section H, Societies and organisations, documents Synge's involvement with 24 UK and overseas organisations from ca 1936 to 1993. There is material relating to the Agricultural Research Council, principally the Ruminant Metabolism Group 1949-1953 and N.W. Pirie's proposals for research on the extraction of leaf protein 1951-1953. Also well-documented is the Association of Scientific Workers 1938-1966. Synge was an enthusiastic supporter of the Association and served as a Vice-President from 1954. Other bodies for which there is significant material are the Biochemical Society - Synge served on the Editorial Board of the Biochemical Journal 1949-1955, the British Nutrition Foundation - Synge was a scientific governor of the Foundation 1974-1979, the Royal Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry - particularly relating to its Chemical Information Group, 1984-1987.

Section J, Correspondence, is substantial and important. There is a main sequence of principal correspondents including A.C. Chibnall, S.R. Elsden, Hugh Gordon, Dorothy Hodgkin, J.H. Humphrey, H.R. Marston, A.J.P. Martin, Stanford Moore, N.W. Pirie, P.L. Robinson, F. Sanger and Arne Tiselius. There is also a chronological sequence of shorter scientific correspondence, requests for off-prints, and references and recommendations.

Synge, Richard Laurence Millington (1914-1994), biochemist

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