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Letters from George Peacock to his family

  • PEAC II
  • Fonds
  • 1807–39

94 letters, most of them written to Peacock's brother William, with six to his father Rev. Thomas Peacock, one each to his sister Hannah and brother Thomas, and nine others addressed to an unspecified 'Dear Sister'. The letters date from the time he was a schoolboy in Richmond until after his appointment to the Ely Deanery.

Peacock, George (1791–1858), mathematician and university reformer

Letters of Alexander Chisholm Gooden

  • GOOD
  • Fonds
  • 1831-1848

Letters of Alexander Chisholm Gooden to his parents and close friends with some from his teachers/tutors to his parents with some letters of condolence after his death.

Gooden, Alexander Chisholm (1818–1841), classical scholar

Correspondence of Dawson Turner, Second Series

  • TURN II
  • Fonds
  • 1787–1851

The collection comprises letters, mainly to Dawson Turner from members of his family (A1–MM1), an engraving (NN1), a poem (OO1), three albums of ‘Etchings and Autographs’ (PP1–3), and notes and illustrative material made or collected by A. N. L. Munby (QQ1–4).

The correspondence in files A1–OO1 consists mainly of personal letters to Dawson Turner from his family and a few friends. Besides a wealth of domestic detail, the letters from Mary Turner and her children contain vivid accounts of their travels in Britain and abroad, including a stay in Rouen shortly after the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Harriet Gunn’s impressions of Belgium (including the site of the Battle of Waterloo) in the 1840s, and a trouble-ridden tour in Germany and Switzerland by Dawson W. Turner. A letter from F. T. Palgrave from Paris in the spring of 1848 gives a fascinating picture of life there during the early days of the Second Republic.

Dawson Turner’s family lived variously in Yarmouth and rural Norfolk, Glasgow, London, and Oxford. Their letters describe personalities and events as well as the localities themselves, and contain observations on such disparate subjects as Queen Victoria’s coronation procession and Charles Macintosh’s newly-invented rubberised raincoats. Art and architecture are carefully documented. There are detailed accounts of private collections and exhibitions of pictures at the Royal Academy and elsewhere, besides the Norfolk church screens and wall-paintings—some of which are now lost—recorded and illustrated by Harriet Gunn. The artists Thomas Phillips and John Sell Cotman were known personally to the Turners and figure in some of their activities.

The only significant body of correspondence not connected with the family is a sequence of some ninety letters written by Turner’s friend and business partner Hudson Gurney (KK1–4). Gurney’s regular commentaries on local businesses and the state of the national economy are counterbalanced by discussions on books, manuscripts, and antiquities, his forays into Norfolk, and his abiding love of London life—the preoccupations of an urbane man who once reported that he had snapped a tendon dancing with 'smart girls’.

The albums of ‘Etchings and Autographs’ (PP1–3) contain prints, cuttings, correspondence, and other manuscript material. Several of the letters are represented by copies in the main correspondence sequence, with notes by Turner showing that the originals belonged at one time to his extensive collection of autographs (these are not at Trinity). The correspondents are, in the main, Turner’s academic acquaintances and minor public figures. Their letters range in content from brief formal messages to discourses on natural history, publications, business, and local affairs. Not all are addressed to Dawson Turner—a good many are to the Palgraves—and some were not written during his lifetime.

Turner, Dawson (1775-1858), banker, botanist, and antiquary

Letters to George Peacock

  • PEAC
  • Fonds
  • 1823–58

The papers consist of 281 letters written to George Peacock from a variety of friends, acquaintances, fellow academics and clergymen.

Peacock, George (1791–1858), mathematician and university reformer

Correspondence of Dawson Turner, Third Series

  • TURN III
  • Fonds
  • 1811–61

These papers include letters to Dawson Turner from members of his family, correspondence between Hudson Gurney and Sir Francis Palgrave, letters from Turner to Gurney, and a few other miscellaneous items.

Turner, Dawson (1775-1858), banker, botanist, and antiquary

Papers of Henry Arthur Bright

  • BRIG
  • Fonds
  • c 1830-1884

The papers consist of over 2000 letters written to Henry Arthur Bright from friends, colleagues, and family members arranged in alphabetical order. Principal correspondents include Robert Brook Aspland, William Robert Brownlow, William Henry Channing, Lord Charlemont, William George Clark, Sir Reginald John Cust, Charles Milnes Gaskell, Lord Houghton (130 letters), Charles Eliot Norton, and Spencer Perceval (b 1828). There are also letters from Hungerford Crewe, and the Hawthorne family, but not Nathaniel himself: Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife Sophia, and children Una and Julian. Letters to Bright's family consist mainly of photocopies.

The last box contains a few miscellaneous items: notes, an essay on ''The Characteristic Difference between Ancient and Modern Civilization' which was awarded the English prize at Trinity College, and a bound volume containing proofs of Lord Houghton's 'Notes on "Endymion"' and Houghton's introduction to the works of Walter Savage Landor in Thomas Humphry Ward's 'The English Poets 1880-1918, Vol. IV, The Nineteenth Centry: Wordsworth to Rossetti', accompanied by a letter and a note from Lord Houghton.

Bright, Henry Arthur (1830–1884), author and merchant

Papers of Frederick Field

  • FIEL
  • Fonds
  • c1819-c1885

The papers consist primarily of writings and notes, with a few printed items and letters documenting Frederick Field's studies at Cambridge as a student in the 1820s and his later work as a biblical scholar. The student notes include essays and notebooks on various subjects, including the Greek dramatic poets, mechanics, and a 'Syllabus of Newton'. Later work includes extensive notes on the books of the Bible in notebooks and in folded fascicles, notes on Chrysostom's Homilies, holograph manuscripts of his 'Origenis Hexaplorum quae supersunt' and 'Otium Norvicensi' part 3, which is also represented by printed sheets with manuscript annotations. Amongst the many other miscellaneous items are indexing slips and a notebook containing a list of subscribers to a unidentified volume.

Field, Frederick (1801–1885), patristics scholar

Papers of Lord Houghton

  • HOUG
  • Fonds
  • 1801–85

Houghton's archive includes Cambridge papers 1827-30, a voluminous correspondence, literary papers, publications 1834-73, political papers 1837-80s, business papers, papers relating to travels 1828-85, papers relating to clubs and societies, commonplace books 1838-65, press cuttings 1801-78, diaries of Lady Houghton 1855-72, papers of R P Milnes, other family papers.

Milnes, Richard Monckton (1809-1885), 1st Baron Houghton, author and politician

Papers of William Whewell

  • WHWL*
  • Fonds
  • [16th]-19th cent.

The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, writings, other Whewell papers, family papers, and later papers of others. The family papers include those originally gathered by Whewell's first wife Cordelia (née Marshall) and his second wife Lady Affleck (née Ellis). The papers of Lady Affleck's brother and Whewell's friend Robert Leslie Ellis now form a subset of this collection.

Whewell, William (1794-1866), college head and writer on the history and philosophy of science

Papers of Robert Burn

  • BURN
  • Fonds
  • 1862–1901

The majority of the papers in this collection are flysheets (A) dealing with issues debated before the Senate, and as such form a valuable insight into subjects and opinions considered important in late nineteenth century Cambridge. Many of these, such as the accounts of various graces on compulsory Greek or reforms to the Classical Tripos, are concerned with Burn's personal academic preoccupations, but it is a measure of his versatility and dedication to the University as a whole that this collection also contains papers written by him on such questions as the plausibility of introducing degrees in Science and the necessity of widening the Cam to facilitate rowing. Also included are papers on matters of national importance, such as the University Tests Bill and the Oxford Declaration, both of which caused heated debate in the Senate and were of particular interest to Burn as a clergyman.

Another interesting feature of this collection is that the authors of many of the flysheets to be found within it are such important University figures of the last century. Jebb, Jackson and Sidgwick, amongst many others, were concerned with fighting their corner on various issues that came before the Senate, and it is through their opinions that it is possible to glimpse the origins of many events and practices (the building of the New Museums or the establishment of the Historical Tripos, to name just two) that became a reality.

The remainder of this collection consists of mark books (B) for the Classical Tripos 1862, when Burn was an examiner, and miscellaneous items (C) preserved along with the collection. The mark books are of particular importance for those interested in the history of Classics at Cambridge, as well as in its main figures: Jebb, for example, is described in a note by Burn as being better at historical prose than philosophical. Amongst the miscellanea are also items which betray the interests of Burn, but also have a much wider appeal, such as architectural plans of excavations at Rome, and accounts of lectures on Roman Art given at Rugby School.

See the attached finding aid for a more detailed description.

Burn, Robert (1829–1904), classical scholar and archaeologist

Papers of Sir Richard Claverhouse Jebb

  • JEBB
  • Fonds
  • 1874–1905

The archive comprises Jebb's 'Servanda': scrapbooks of material 'to be kept'. Press clippings, correspondence, printed parliamentary and academic material, ephemera and so on are pasted in to numbered pages, sometimes with MS annotations by Jebb; loose material, such as correspondence, is interleaved. The first volumes are disbound and have been weeded, with remaining pages preserved in paper wrappings within 'transfer cases'.

Transfer case 1 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks I (Jul 1876-Nov 1879, with loose letter from 1874), II (Jan 1880–Nov 1881) and III (Nov 1881-Apr 1883); separate gatherings in paper covers also seem to have come from this volume: Nov 1881, ‘Mahuffy v R.C.J. (scant contents)’, ‘R.C.J.’s Life of Bentley’, 1882; ‘Controversy with Sayce, 1881-1882’; Transfer case 2 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks IV (Nov 1883-Jun 1884) and V; Transfer case 3 contains much loose material and scrapbook pages, presumably from 'Servanda' VI and VII, as well as papers from 'Servanda' VIII (1889).

The intact 'Servanda' volumes cover the following dates: IX, Mar 1890-Oct 1891; X, Oct 1891-Oct 1893; XI, Oct 1893-Aug 1894; XIA, 1894-Jun 1896; XII, Sept 1894-Nov 1896; XIII, Nov 1896-Jul 1898; XIV, Jul 1898-Jul 1899; XV, Jul 1899-May 1900; XVI, Jun 1900-Mar 1902; XVII, Mar 1902-Jul 1903.

There are also two bound volumes both labelled 'Newspaper Cuttings', one containing similar material to that contained in the 'Servanda' scrapbooks from 1903-1905, the other containing press cuttings relating to Jebb's death, letters regarding this mainly to Lady Jebb, material relating to Jebb's funeral service, and reviews of his edition of Bacchylides (1905-1906).

Jebb, Sir Richard Claverhouse (1841–1905), knight, Greek scholar

Papers of A. J. Munby and Hannah Cullwick

  • MUNB
  • Fonds
  • 1850s-1907

Diaries of Arthur Munby 1859-98, diaries of visits to Hannah 1885-1907, notebooks 1864-87, Hannah’s diaries 1854-73, letters from Hannah to Munby 1870-1907, manuscripts of Munby’s poetry, manuscript of Faithful Servants, albums of photographs and cartes de visite 1850s-1900s

Munby, Arthur Joseph (1828-1910), diarist and civil servant

Papers of Erskine Childers

  • CHIL
  • Fonds
  • 1880–1922

The papers consist of correspondence, printed material, writings, personal papers, and photographs documenting the English life of Erskine Childers. The correspondence includes incoming letters to Erskine and to Molly Childers, copies of letters sent by Erskine, and a large number of letters written to others from others.

There are over 75 letters from Erskine to Molly dated 1903-1913; Erskine's other principal correspondents include Ian Hamilton, Field Marshal Frederick Roberts, and Basil Williams. Molly's principal correspondents include Benoît-Constant Coquelin, Kate Courtney, and John Singer Sargent. The collection includes letters from a variety of other correspondents, among them Edward Arnold, Julian Corbett, Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry James, William James, Lord Kitchener, J. Ellis McTaggart, Walter Runciman, George Bernard Shaw (to Emily Ford), and G. M. Trevelyan.

Printed material includes cuttings of reviews for 'The H.A.C. in South Africa', 'The Times History of the war in South Africa', 'War and the Arme Blanche', 'The Riddle of the Sands', and 'The German Influence on British Cavalry'; cuttings of articles on cruising printed in 'The Times' from 1907-1913; as well as two issues of 'Poblacht na hÉireann' from 21, 23 October, 1922.

The collection also includes a holograph poem apiece by Bronson Alcott and William Ellery Channing, photographs of Benoît-Constant Coquelin, and a signed photograph of Sarah Bernhardt.

Childers, Robert Erskine (1870–1922), author and politician

Papers of Huia Onslow

  • ONSL
  • Fonds
  • 1896–1924

This collection does not contain a great quantity of personal material: there is no correspondence with family and friends, for example; there is however a manuscript account of a tour by yacht on the Norfolk Broads in 1903, perhaps by Huia Onslow's governess Helen Moodie as well as creative work by Huia Onslow, such as poetry and a short story, and his translations of poems from Joachim du Bellay's Amours. There is also a group of letters relating to Onslow's stay for health reasons at Banchory, Scotland, in 1913, mainly concerning the choice of house and payment of rent. Financial and legal material includes correspondence between Onslow and his solicitors regarding duties payable on the death of his father William, 4th Earl of Onslow, in 1911, statements of rent received from properties in London account books (including a record of laboratory expenses, 1918-1922), and an inventory and valuation of furniture at Onslow's house made after his death.

Despite the lack of personal correspondence, the papers include a large number of letters. Significant groups include: Onslow's correspondence with J. Donovan, sparked by Donovan's advert in the Athenaeum magazine asking for a physicist to provide him with help on 'an original line of inquiry bearing on the explanation of Life and Mind in exclusively physical terms'; correspondence with various members connected to the Eugenics Education Society (1914-1920) relating to Onslow's work for them; and letters relating to Onslow's work as secretary for the Anaesthetics Emergency Fund of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Families Association (1915-1916), particularly over-seeing contributions from New Zealand.

Correspondence relating to Onslow's own work includes: letters to and from George MacElwee and Frederick Fletcher in response to Onslow's advertisement in the Times as 'A Struggling Scientist' seeking funds for his research (1914-1915); letters between Onslow, William Auton, and Helen Moodie regarding the breeding of rabbits and mice (1914-1915), as well as letters from H. W. Blake, Mabel Illingworth, and W. S. Singleton on the same subject. There is however no correspondence with Sydney Cole (except for a 1914 bill from Cole for private tution), Muriel Wheldale or other scientists.

Onslow's scientific research is well represented in the form of notes: most of the material in this category is in the form of notebooks recording record his investigations into genetics and biochemistry from 1912 onwards, such as three large books on Onslow's programme of breeding rabbits for colour, and books concering his research into pigmentation in insects (butterflies and beetles) and birds. Also present is a fair quantity of loose material on experiments relating to trytophan, probably the work which led to his (posthumously published) paper on the subject. Onslow's interest in hypnosis is also reflected in his loose notes, which include observations from a series of hypnosis sessions in 1912.

There are also drafts of several of Onslow's articles, some later published, others seemingly unpublished, and offprints of the majority of his published articles. Finally, there are a few textbooks, presumably used by Onslow as an undergraduate.

Onslow, Victor Alexander Herbert Huia (1890–1922), biochemist

Lectures by D. A. Winstanley on Constitutional History

  • WINS
  • Fonds
  • c 1906-1935

66 lectures on constitutional history written in Winstanley's hand on loose sheets of paper, each headed with a lecture number and title. Accompanied by a holograph book list relating to study of the sixteenth century and an incomplete lecture/review? on George I and his relationship with his Cabinet and Secretaries of State. The items are undated but presumably date from one of Winstanley's tenures at Cambridge: from 1906-1914 or 1919-1935.

Winstanley, Denys Arthur (1877–1947), historian

Papers of J. D. Duff

  • DUFF
  • Fonds
  • 1888–1940

The majority of this archive consists of letters by Duff to members of his family, viz.: (A): to his wife Laura, 45 letters, 1897-1909; (B): to his son Alan, 356 letters, 1909-1933; (C): to his son Patrick, 96 letters, 1909-1934; (D): to his son James, 4 letters, 1909-1916; (E): to his daughter Hester, 8 letters, 1933-1934; (F): to his daughter Mary, 1 letter, 1911.

There are also 68 letters (G) from Laura Duff to her son Alan, 1915-1940, and three (H) to her husband J.D. Duff, relating to their son James's entrance examinations for Wellington College in 1910. J, K and L are letters written by their sons: 3 letters and a postcard from Alan Duff to his mother, 1909-1920 (J), a letter from James Duff to Alan Duff, 1911 (K), and a letter from Patrick Duff to J. F. Duff, relating to J. F. Duff winning a scholarship to Trinity in 1916 (L).

The final group of letters (M) are by various authors: one from J. D. Duff to Diana Frances Crawley, future wife of his son Alan, on the death of her father, 1933; letters to A. C. Duff from W. G. Collett (1911) and R. Moore (1913) at Wellington College; letter to J. D. Duff from G. M. Trevelyan, 1934 about Edward Fitzgerald's letters; letter to Laura Duff from the Postmaster at Cambridge, 1923, relating to a telegram from Cairo.

Miscellaneous material (N) comprises: copy of the marriage certificate of James Duff Duff and Laura Lenox-Coningham, 1895; page torn from a notebook with short phrase in Ancient Greek; memoir, "Lemnos" of an army camp, probably by A. C. Duff, with envelope addressed to J. D. Duff.

Finally there are twenty eight of J. D. Duff's pocket diaries (usually by Lett's) dating from 1888-1912, 1915-1918, 1922-1926, and 1931-1934; the earliest are kept as appointment books, with brief notes of college and social occasions, but Duff's entries later expand to be fuller records of his days, typically recording weather, reading material, pastimes and family news. A notebook with A. C. Duff's name and address at the front contains 'Extracts from F[ather's] Diary'.

Duff, James Duff (1860-1940), classicist

Papers of Sir James Frazer

  • FRAZ
  • Fonds
  • 1745-1941

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, notebooks, diaries, music manuscripts, printed material, and photographs which document the life and work of social anthropologist and classical scholar Sir James George Frazer, and to a lesser extent that of his wife, the writer and translator Lilly Frazer (known after June 1914 as Lady Frazer), who acted as his manager and press agent. The collection spans the years 1872-1941, but the bulk of the material dates from the 1920s and 1930s.

Research strengths include Frazer’s writings in the 1920s and 1930s, social anthropology, folklore, classical scholarship, British and French publishing history, and Trinity College academic and social life. The bulk of the collection dates from the last two decades of his life, and therefore contains material from a time well after his reputation was established. While there are letters from people with anthropological data, the collection does not include the vast amount of data and answers to his anthropological questionnaires that he presumably possessed when compiling the first edition of 'The Golden Bough'. Very often letters with anthropological data are in the form of fan letters, whose writers wish to correct or add to information in one of his books.

The papers are arranged in small and repeated groupings, with alphabetical runs of letters followed by writings and printed material, returning to more alphabetical runs of letters featuring many of the same correspondents as the previous runs, more writings, and research materials, and on. The searching abilities of the database will be useful to find all materials by a person or on a subject.

The correspondence is almost entirely incoming, with just 29 original letters from James Frazer (in FRAZ/1) and 15 typed copies of his letters (in FRAZ/1-4, 16, 25 and 29) and twelve original letters, a draft and four typed copies by Lilly Frazer (in FRAZ/1, 3, 17, 31 and 33) in a collection of over 2300 letters evenly divided between the two. In addition to runs of alphabetically arranged letters, there are also groups of letters on specific topics featuring many of the same correspondents. Letters may also be found with writings and research notes elsewhere in the collection.

The correspondence spans the years 1872-1941, however, the earliest dated letter to or from James or Lilly is dated January 1888. There are a limited number of letters from this early period. Many letters addressed to Lilly concern business related to James’ works, and some letters written in the late 1930s are addressed to her to be read aloud to him due to his increasing blindness.

Anthropologists appearing in the collection include L. C. G. Clarke, Edward Clodd, A. C. Haddon, J. H. Hutton, Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, Bronisław Malinowski, R. R. Marett, John Roscoe, and Sir Grafton Elliot Smith. There are only three letters from Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer, but 16 from his daughter Dorothy Young. Classical scholars in the collection include A. B. Cook, F. M. Cornford, A. E. Housman, J. P. Postgate, Sir William Ridgeway, and H. J. Rose. Principal editors and publishers in the collection include James Loeb, George Macmillan, T. E. Page, and W. H. D. Rouse. Other principal correspondents are David Lindsay, the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres; and Sir Joseph Thomson and his wife Rose Thomson. Many of Lilly's correspondents write to her in her native French. Her principal correspondents include François Ceccaldi (many of them written from his native Corsica), Noémi Psichari, the daughter of Ernest Renan; translator Pierre Sayn, and James’ friend W. J. Lewis.

Writings by Sir James Frazer comprise 21 boxes, with additional writings to be found in the notebooks in FRAZ/35. The work represented by the most amount of material in the collection is Frazer’s edition of Ovid’s 'Fasti', published by Macmillan in 1929, and by Loeb in 1931. The papers do not include notes for the preparation of the original 'Golden Bough' nor do they include the manuscript. There are, however, three notebooks containing notes relating to the second and third editions (FRAZ/35/9-11). Frazer’s own copies of the different editions of 'The Golden Bough' are housed separately in the printed books Adversaria collection and carry numerous annotations.

Printed material consists of press cuttings, pamphlets, offprints, and small books. An album of cuttings of reviews of the first edition of 'The Golden Bough' may be found at FRAZ/22/4. Ten small books and pamphlets have also been catalogued into the Trinity Library printed materials catalogue but remain housed with the papers. The music manuscripts are housed in FRAZ/8 and consist of scores composed by Stuart Young setting Sir James’ poems to music. Margaret Rose’s operetta libretto based on Lady Frazer’s story 'The Singing Wood' was similarly set to music (the libretto at FRAZ/32/266 and the score FRAZ/8/1/5).

The travel diaries and many of the notebooks were previously housed on Trinity College Library shelves with printed books and have been reunited with the collection, along with 13 volumes and a small number of loose notes returned from the Haddon Library of Archaeology and Anthropology. The photographs in the collection include 16 photographic prints of sites in Greece possibly taken by Sidney George Owen, two of them dated June 1906 (FRAZ/21/67-82).

Frazer, Sir James George (1854-1941), knight, social anthropologist and classical scholar

Papers of Francis Aston

  • ASTN
  • Fonds
  • 1920-1942

Writings, printed material, and miscellaneous material relating to both editions of F. W. Aston's 'Isotopes' and both editions of the later revision, 'Mass-spectra and Isotopes'.

The writings include an incomplete[?] draft of the first edition of 'Isotopes' written in Aston's hand [ASTN 1], some pages written on the verso of minutes of the British Association for the Advancement of Science [ca 1920-1923], with related notes and including a postcard from Hugh Frank Newall dated Dec. 193[?] about a reference found in [Antonius] van den Broek [ASTN 1/104]; other drafts are a combination of typescript and printed material with emendations in Aston's hand and that of a typesetter, some of it written on C. P. Snow's letterhead., with original material for the plates and figures [ASTN 2, 4, 7, 8].

Accompanied by printed copies of 'Isotopes' which contain some edits and have been cut up for use in the revision [ASTN 3, 6], and a typescript letter from F. P. Dunn of Edward Arnold Publishers dated Nov. 1923 sending unbound copies of 'Isotopes' for his use [ASTN 5]. Also accompanied by offprints of other works, also with emendations and cut sections [ASTN 9], and a letter from F. A. Towle of the Royal Society in July 1927 returning figures for his Bakerian Lecture [ASTN 10].

Aston, Francis William (1877–1945), physicist

Papers of Sir Henry Babington Smith

  • SMIH
  • Fonds
  • 1833-1942

The archive contains school and University papers 1871-1905, diaries 1881-94, Education Department and Treasury papers 1883-93. Papers relating to India 1891-1904, the Natal finance 1899-1900, the Ottoman public debt 1893-09, the General Post office 1903-09, the National Bank of Turkey 1903-17, the Royal Commission on the Civil Service 1912-15, wartime finance and trade 1915-21, the Indian Exchange and Currency Committee 1914-20 and the Railways Amalgamation Tribunal 1921-23. Correspondence 1873-1923. Papers of Lady Elisabeth Mary Babington Smith 1894-1935. Bruce family correspondence 1861-1938.

Smith, Sir Henry Babington (1863–1923), knight, civil servant and financier

Papers of R. B. McKerrow

  • MCKW
  • Fonds
  • 1858–1945

This collection contains correspondence of McKerrow, mainly relating to bibliography and English literature, with various writings by him on the same subjects; early attempts at fiction, verse, and drama; and some personal papers. There are also some family papers, including papers relating to the firm of Brunlees & McKerrow and the estate of Sir James Brunlees, and letters written by McKerrow’s son Malcolm during the Second World War, describing his experiences with the Non-Combatant Corps and the Auxiliary Military Pioneer Corps.

McKerrow, Ronald Brunlees (1872-1940), bibliographer and literary scholar

Papers of G. T. Lapsley

  • LAPS
  • Fonds
  • 1901-1948

The papers consist of writings, research papers, printed material, photographs, and miscellaneous materials, and are arranged into seven series: A. Book Reviews by Lapsley of the books of others; B. Notes on Edith Wharton and Henry de Bracton; C. Lecture Notes: files of documents including notes, bibliographies and narrative sequences used in planning 'English Constitutional History to 1485'; D. Pamphlets, Journals and Books; E. Manuscript index cards, in sections, of books relevant to Lapsley's work; F. Photographs; G. Miscellaneous.

The writings reflect Lapsley's interest in medieval history, with a sizeable amount of work on Henry de Bracton, amongst others. Other papers reflect his work as Edith Wharton's literary executor, and a selection of her material survives in this collection, such as a transcript of her speech to the American Academy of Arts and Letters on accepting the Gold Medal for her services to Letters.

There are also a number of lecture notes and reviews published in the 'Cambridge Review' and other periodicals, and a variety of letters from friends, editors and fellow historians.

The printed materials are a mixture of historical journals and college documents including the WWII roll of honour. The photographs consist of three cabinet card photographs, one of them a duplicate, of two images of Edith Wharton posing with dogs.

Lapsley, Gaillard Thomas (1871–1949), American constitutional historian

Mayor Papers

  • MAYR
  • Fonds
  • 1664–1949

The Mayor Papers comprise papers of three intermarried families, the Mayors, Grotes and Bickersteths, all of whom had some connection with Cambridge. The vast majority of the material is correspondence with family and friends on subjects such as health, bereavement, faith and the like.

The earliest member of the Mayor family represented in the papers is John Mayor, vicar of Shawbury in Shropshire. Of his sons, Joseph became a Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge and later Rector of South Collingham in Nottinghamshire. Another son, Robert, became a missionary for the Church Missionary Society and spent much of the 1820s in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) with his wife Elizabeth Bickersteth, before returning to England and eventually becoming Rector of Acton near Nantwich. Robert and Charlotte's missionary work and their life in Ceylon is well represented in the archive by many detailed letters home to family.

Three of Robert and Elizabeth's sons became Fellows of St John's, Robert Bickersteth Mayor, who later became Mathematical Master at Rugby and Rector of Frating, John Eyton Bickersteth Mayor, who was University Librarian and Professor of Latin at Cambridge and Joseph Bickersteth Mayor, who became Professor of Classics at King's College, London. Their letters home and to each other give a vivid view of college life in the mid-nineteenth century. Joseph Bickersteth Mayor married Alexandrina Jessie Grote, and their children included Robert John Grote Mayor, always known as 'Robin', Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and Flora MacDonald Mayor, author.

The Grote family came over to England in the eighteenth century. By profession they were bankers and a few early letters of Andreas, Joseph and George Grote senior are preserved, giving some idea of their banking business and financial links to mainland Europe. George sen. married Selina Mary Peckwell, establishing a link with the Peckwell, Blossett, de Salis and Le Coq St. Leger families. They had 11 children, the eldest of which, George, followed the family business before becoming MP for the City of London and later writing a history of Ancient Greece. Four of his brothers joined the Indian civil service; one, Andrew, married Isabella Macdonald and the correspondence with members of this family give a view of nineteenth century Scottish life. Another brother, John, was a Fellow of Trinity College, Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy, and vicar of Trumpington.

Much of the correspondence representing the Bickersteth family is from Henry and Elizabeth Bickersteth to their son John Bickersteth, a student at Trinity and later vicar of Acton. Henry and his son Robert were surgeons in Liverpool, and there is comment both on life in Liverpool and in Kirkby Lonsdale, Henry Bickersteth's original home. There are also some letters from Edward Bickersteth, secretary of the Church Missionary Society, and Henry Bickersteth, Baron Langdale, Master of the Rolls. Robert, Edward, and Henry the younger were brothers of Robert Mayor's wife Charlotte.

The Mayor family

Papers of Ludwig Wittgenstein

  • WITT
  • Fonds
  • 1914-1951

The largest surviving portion of Wittgenstein's nachlass containing his working papers 1914-1951

Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johann (1889-1951), philosopher

Manuscripts in Printed Books

  • MSPB
  • Fonds
  • 1791-1955

Most of the items included in this category are letters, and most are connected with the publications into which they are inserted.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of Sir Joseph Thomson (J. J. Thomson), Part II

  • THMJ II
  • Fonds
  • 1836–1958

The material in this collection covers the period 1836-1958. It is presented in eight sections.

Section A, Biographical, covers the period 1874-1958. The material includes biographical profiles, certificates, press cuttings, photographs and invitations. Correspondence and papers used by Lord Rayleigh in the preparation of his biography of Thomson The Life of Sir J. J. Thomson O.M. sometime master of Trinity College, Cambridge (Cambridge, 1942) can be found at A/23-A31. A/110-A/143 include press cuttings on Thomson's lectures and reviews of his publications. Certificates are at A/72-A/103

Section B, Family and personal, is the largest in the collection and spans the period 1836-1952. The bulk of the material consists of family and personal correspondence sent to members of the Thomson and Paget families between 1872 and 1952. This correspondence has been arranged by recipient, thus for example, letters from Thomson to his wife are to be found in Lady Thomson's correspondence at B/45-B/53 rather than in that of Thomson himself (B/1-B/6). There is significant correspondence sent to Thomson, 1873-1940, but the largest component of the section, at B/45-B/639, is correspondence and papers of Lady Thomson covering the period 1872-1950. This includes family and personal correspondence received by Lady Thomson, notebooks and diaries, and correspondence from societies and organisations. At B/640-B/679 is correspondence received by other family members including G.P. Thomson, J.P. Thomson, F.V. Thomson and G.E. Paget. The section also includes photographs, household accounts and a little miscellaneous material.

Section C, Trinity College, Cambridge, consists chiefly of incoming correspondence sent to Thomson as Master of Trinity College, Cambridge and covers the period 1918-1944. The bulk relates to College matters including students, Fellows, meetings etc., but there is also business and personal correspondence including letters of congratulations on Thomson's installation as Master in 1918. The correspondence includes letters from Cambridge colleagues such as E. Rutherford, R.T. Glazebrook, J.G. Frazer and A. Schuster. The section also includes invitations to social occasions received by the Thomsons and replies to invitations to social events hosted by the Thomsons between 1918 and 1938. There are also a small number of Trinity College entrance examination papers and scripts.

Section D, Research, is very slight. It consists of a few research notes and photographs for the period 1893 to 1934.

Section E, Societies and organisations, is also slight. It has been arranged in alphabetical order and covers the period 1886-1930. The most significant material is that at E/10-E/28: reports and minutes of the Committee on Science in the Educational System of Great Britain, which Thomson chaired between 1902 and 1920. There is also a small amount of Royal Society material.

Section F, Lectures, speeches and publications, covers the period 1876-1938. There is material on a number of Thomson's public lectures and speeches including lectures given at the British Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Winnipeg, Canada, 1909. A notebook at F/27 has typescript notes on lectures delivered at Cambridge by Thomson. Publications material includes manuscript drafts of the first edition of Conduction of Electricity through Gases (Cambridge 1903) and Rays of Positive Electricity (London 1913). Press cuttings on Thomson's lectures and publications can be found at A/110-A/143.

Section G, Visits and conferences, is not extensive. The material has been arranged in chronological order 1896-1938. It includes brief correspondence on the British Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, 1909.

Section H, Correspondence, is presented in two sequences, scientific and general. The scientific sequence includes letters from G.G. Stokes, Lord Rayleigh (4th Baron) and Lord Kelvin. The general sequence is arranged in chronological order covering the period 1888-1938. A file of 'Letters to JJ from distinguished people and others' is at H/32-H/35, which includes correspondence from Arthur Balfour, Stanley Baldwin and Austen Chamberlain.

Thomson, Sir Joseph John (1856-1940), knight, physicist

Papers of Robert Calverley Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

  • TRER
  • Fonds
  • 1865-1958

The archive contains papers of both Robert Calverley Trevelyan and his wife Elizabeth (née des Amorie van der Hoeven, known as Bessie), though the majority relate to R. C. Trevelyan and comprise personal items 1872-1951, publications 1898-1950, publications 1989-1950, reviews of publications 1898-1953, photographs 1876-1949, family material.

This archive is in the process of being catalogued: the majority of the correspondence has been catalogued at item level, while around fifteen boxes predominantly containing working notebooks and photographs remain; work on these and revisions will follow.

Trevelyan, Robert Calverley (1872-1951), poet, dramatist, and translator

Papers of Sir Walter Greg (W. W. Greg)

  • GREG
  • Fonds
  • 1893–1958

This collection includes correspondence—mainly letters to Greg from fellow-bibliographers and literary scholars—notes, photographs of books and manuscripts, cuttings, a few small printed items, and the manuscript of part of Some Aspects of London Publishing.

Greg, Sir Walter Wilson (1875-1959), knight, literary scholar and bibliographer

Papers of Sir Walter Lamb (W. R. M. Lamb)

  • LAMB
  • Fonds
  • 1882–1961

Diaries 1867-1960 (mostly relating to Royal Academy business), correspondence

Lamb, Sir Walter Rangeley Maitland (1882–1961), knight, classicist and Secretary of the Royal Academy of Arts

Papers of Arthur Hamilton Smith

  • SMIA
  • Fonds
  • 1872–1962

The collection comprises: letters to Arthur Hamilton Smith, including one from John Forsdyke, April 1939, on the controversial British Museum cleaning of the Parthenon sculptures, c. 27 items, 1903-1939; Smith's 'Statement of Services' and testimonials in application for the position of Keeper of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, 1908; notebooks kept on archaeological expeditions in Asia Minor, 1884 (includes two photographs) and Cyprus, 1890s; 'Letts Oblong Diary, 1909' containing an account of travels in Greece, Egypt and Italy.

Personal material of Arthur Hamilton Smith includes a notebook labelled ""Annals of the C[ambridge University Fencing Club, founded 1882"; diary, 1883-1890 (with gaps); [Apostles Society dinner] menus, 1885-1888; notebook kept by Smith recording outgoings on his 'Cash Account', 1897-1936; photograph of Smith as a young man and another of his house in Rome; material relating to his being appointed Companion of the Order of the Bath in 1926.

There are also letters and postcards from Arthur Hamilton Smith to his wife Gertrude (59 items, 1897-1922), sister Daisy /Margaret (1881), and mother Susan (74 items, 1881-1912); these often include accounts of his work and travels, and sometimes sketches; occasional items are written in shorthand. Letters to Susan Smith from schoolmasters about her son Arthur (1872, 1879) and his reports from Winchester College (1874-1877), Herbert Kitchener about her son Charlie (1883?), and letters from Gertrude and Blomfield Jackson written on Gertrude's engagement to Arthur (1897); letters to Gertrude on her engagement from Margaret Smith (1897), and on the death of her husband (1941).

Fifteen letters to Elizabeth Hamilton Smith from her parents (1903-1932) and one from 'Archie' (1962); this last appears to relate to a letter of the same date about the Shell Periphery Camera sent to A[rchibald?] Parker Smith and asking for further details about Arthur Hamilton Smith's patent 'Cyclograph', regarding which there is further correspondence of Elizabeth Hamilton Smith, as well as the original award of the patent in 1895.

Legal and financial material, much to do with family trusts and property (c 15 items, 1896-1921), as well as printed material such as the obituary of Arthur Hamilton Smith by F. G. Kenyon in the "Proceedings of the British Academy", 1941.

Smith, Arthur Hamilton (1860-1941), museum curator

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